Homesteading Family: How to Dry Fresh Herbs (Oven, Dehydrator, or Hanging)

Carolyn Thomas at Homesteading Family has an article on How to Dry Fresh Herbs (Oven, Dehydrator, or Hanging)

Growing and preserving fresh culinary herbs is so much easier than one might think. But there are a few tips to know when learning how to dry herbs for long-term storage and use. We’re sharing all our tips in this post.

We like to plant all sorts of herbs in our cottage garden. We’ve written a post on the top 15 medicinal herbs you can grow yourself. We also love to grow roses and use their dried petals medicinally and in a DIY facewash.

If you’re interested in other preservation methods for herbs, click this link for two more ways to quickly and easily preserve your herbs at home.

Tips for the Best Herbs

There are a few tips you should follow in order to get the best tasting, and highest quality culinary herbs.

  1. Start with freshly harvested herbs. Herbs that were harvested a day or more prior to drying will lose flavor and potency. It’s best to work with herbs that are as fresh as possible.
  2. Know the “enemies” of herbs. Sunlight, air exposure, and moisture are all no-no’s when it comes to getting quality herbs. We’ll discuss each of these more in-depth below.
  3. Enhance the flavor of your herbs!

 

By following all these tips, you’ll end up with the most flavor, the most potent and the best quality herbs. Not to mention you won’t be paying grocery store pricing as you’ll only have spent a few cents on the price of the seeds!

Fresh Herbs

Starting with fresh herbs ensures the best end product. You don’t want to harvest herbs and allow them to sit and get wilted before dehydrating.

When possible, harvest herbs just before you plan to bundle them and dry them. It’s really best to do this all in one day, even within an hour or so from harvesting.

Dried Herb “Enemies”

As mentioned above, the “enemies” of herbs are sunlight, airflow, and moisture.

Sunlight

When drying and storing herbs, it’s important to choose a section of your home where they’ll be out of direct sunlight.

It’s true herbs need sunlight to grow, but when it’s time for them to be dried, sunlight will degrade the herbs quickly.

Airflow

Choose an area of your home where there is minimal foot traffic.

Herbs that are hanging will collect dust and particles floating around in the air, so the less air movement surrounding them, the better quality you’ll end up with in the end.

Moisture

Storing herbs correctly will prolong the life of your herbs. This is probably the most important one to watch out for.

When storing herbs, an airtight container such as a mason jar is a great option.

But it’s imperative your herbs are completely dry before sealing them.

One test you can do is to crumble them and seal them tightly in a mason jar. Watch the jar for 24 hours, if ANY condensation forms on the inside of the jar, the herbs were not completely dry.

If this happens, remove the herbs from the jar and allow them to continue drying.

You can do this test as many times as needed.

Different Methods for Drying Herbs

There are a few different methods for drying herbs. You can use your oven, a dehydrator, or our favorite method is to hang them in bundles.

How to Dry in the Oven

Drying in the oven doesn’t actually mean turning the oven on.

To dry herbs in the oven, arrange your herbs on a cookie sheet and then place them in an oven with only the pilot light lit, or the oven light on.

Drying with a Dehydrator

Using a dehydrator is a great option if you want them done quickly and in a protected area.

Arrange herbs on the dehydrator trays and dehydrate at the lowest possible temperature until completely dry.

Hang Dry in Bundles

Our favorite method for how to dry herbs is to hang them in bundles.

We have a room off of our kitchen that doesn’t get too much foot traffic where we hang them from the ceiling until completely dry.

Keep reading for our tips on how to hang dry herbs.

 

How to Hang Dry Herbs

The best tip when hanging herbs is to gather the sprigs in bundles that aren’t too dense, nor too sparse.Where you live and the humidity in the area you’re drying the herbs will determine how thick your bunches can be.

In dessert climates, you can bundle together many more herbs than say the humid south.

Hang From Twine

Twine is a great tool to hang herbs with. Tying the twine in a slipknot and then wrapping that around the end of your bundle will allow the twine to tighten down on your herbs as they dry, eliminating the possibility of losing sprigs to the floor.

Once your herbs are completely dry, crumble them with your hands and store in an airtight container.Now you can enjoy your homegrown culinary herbs all year long!

Christian Prepper Gal: Proper Storage of DIY Emergency Meals

Christian Prepper Gal has a thorough article on How to Properly Package and Store Homemade DIY Emergency Meals.

Vacuum sealing vs mylar bags

When I first learned that we could dehydrate food and keep it for long term food storage I was so excited!! I immediately bought an inexpensive, but good, dehydrator. While looking for recipes and such as to what to do with my new dehydrated foods I ran across what are called meals in a jar. I wasn’t really looking for meals in a jar because the emergency meals I had were for us to use if we had to “bug out”. So, I didn’t get too excited about them. That is, until I ran across a YouTube video of what this lady was calling a “meal in a bag”. Hmmm. Now that was something I could get interested in!

I already had some military MREs in our food storage, and was aware of emergency foods such as Mountain House and Wise Foods meals. I even had a couple of sample kits of emergency meals. So, I knew that not only would these meals be cheaper to make myself, but they would also be healthier. And, I could make food that my family would actually eat! (I have very picky eaters here.) So, I started looking for other recipes because I like to have a variety of foods and choices. But, recipes were not that easy to find. So, I started experimenting with how I could make up my own recipes. And, that’s how I started making my own meals in a bag!

However, upon further research for meals in a bag I became confused. I thought you could store the meals in either a mylar bag or a vacuum sealer bag. Well, actually you can store in either. But, what I discovered along the way is that the mylar bags will last longer than the vacuum sealer bags. I’ve even done videos and written recipes using and suggesting you could use either mylar bags or vacuum sealer bags to store the meals. And, that’s why I decided to write this article to explain the difference as well as the way you should store meals in a bag or jar and other dehydrated/freeze dried foods.

Mylar Bags

Mylar bags are deemed to be by far the best way to store meals in a bag. Apparently mylar bags are made for long term use. I do not personally know how long they will last because I’ve only been using them for a couple of years. Supposedly, they are good for 25 plus years. And that’s what makes them superior to vacuum sealer bags. Although, that does not mean you can’t continue to use vacuum seale bags if that’s what you are using. I will explain that in just a bit.

When storing dehydrated or freeze dried food in a mylar bag you will need to place an active oxygen absorber inside the bag before sealing the bag. The oxygen absorber draws all of the oxygen that is in the bag. It usually takes 3-4 hours to do so; however, I’ve had some take as long as overnight.

Not sure what size oxygen absorbers you need? Since I use either pint or quart size mylar bags for my meals I use 300cc oxygen absorbers. Although, a 100cc size is recommended as a minimum. I’ve also read that the 300cc is what is recommended for the gallon size. My first mylar bag purchase included the 300cc so that’s what I’ve gone with since.

It is easy to seal mylar bags. They have to be sealed with a high heat. Most vacuum sealers do not have a high enough heat to seal mylar bags properly and it is recommeded that you do not use the sealer on them. But, not to worry. All you have to have to seal mylar bags properly is a flat straightening iron that is used for straightening hair. That’s right! Just clamp one half of the top portion of the bag with the straightening iron, hold it there for around 20-30 seconds, turn the bag over and do the same to the other half. Easy and simple! Oh, and vacuum sealers will not draw the air out of a mylar bag propery either. They weren’t made for mylar bags and mylar bags were not made for vacuum sealers. You can also use an impulse heat sealer to seal the mylar bags if you prefer and it is within your budget to buy one.

A quick note: The mylar bag above has a zipper at the top. Just so you know, that does NOT mean that you do not have to seal the bag. You just seal it above the zipper. The zipper is so you can open the bag and zip it shut, or re-use it. It does not keep air completely out of the bag like heat sealing it does.

Vacuum Sealer Bags

As stated above, I started out using vacuum sealer bags for my homemade emergency meals. However, upon learning that they will only last for around two to five years before air will start to seep back in through the pores of the plastic, I stopped using them for my meals. They may last longer than said two to five years, but I did not want to take that chance.

The vacuum sealer bags are epecially susceptible to leaking when storing rice or other sharp dehydrated foods in them. So, if you are or did use these you will need to check them once in a while to make sure they are not leaking. One way to help avoid this is to place rice or other sharp foods inside a brown paper bag before placing them into the vacuum sealer bag. I’ve also used thick paper towels to help protect food from poking through. All it takes is a tiny pin prick size hole to allow enough air in to spoil the food.

As long as you check the bags often and rotate them (cooking the food in the bags and replacing them with new meals in a bag) every couple of years you should be just fine using the vacuum sealer bags. I didn’t throw out the ones I have in vacuum sealer bags because I know they will be good for a couple of more years and I just plan on rotating them out.

Canning Jars…(continues)

Click here to read the entire article at Christian Prepper Gal.