Prosser Kiwanis Organizational Meeting, June 21, 2018

There will be an organizational meeting for starting a Prosser, WA Kiwanis Club on Thursday, June 21st, 2018 at 6:00 pm. Bring a friend, coworker, or family member to help start the Prosser chapter and improve the community.

Location:

Best Western Plus

The Inn at Horse Heaven Hills

259 Merlot Drive

Prosser, WA

Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to improving the world one child and one community at a time. Every club is committed to doing service that is close to its hear and crucial to its community. Local clubs determine their own projects, and the best way to meet the needs of their community. Learn about and serve your community, make new friends and develop new relationships,  and do it all as a fun team; join Kiwanis!

Interested in finding out more? Contact Bill Glenn, Pacific Northwest District of Kiwanis International at mrradiodad@aol.com.

Click here to download a printable pdf flyer.

Regular Assembly of the Whole, June 14th, 2018

Please join us at the Patriot barn on June 14th, at 6:30 pm for an LVA barbecue. We will have a short business portion followed by food and fellowship. We ask that everyone bring a side dish and lawn chairs. BBQ chicken will be provided as well as dessert. Also please save the date of Tuesday, June 26th for the Center for Self-Governance screening of the Finicum documentary Dead Man Talking, with Lavoy’s widow Jeanette Finicum. We want to be an encouragement to both of them and their efforts.

Click here to download a printable agenda.

Blanchard: Guide to Parenting

Kenn Blanchard of Black Man with a Gun has written a short essay on parenting responsibility. It’s worth your time to give it a read.

First I want to tip my hat to those successful baby boomers that are now the gray haired group in their seventies.

This generation that survived the Civil Rights era, bussing, political upheavals, World War II, the Nazi Holocaust, fear of the H-Bomb, Korea, Viet Nam, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Watergate, have raised children that have invented the internet, social media, drones, video games, remote control vehicles, cell phones and all the stuff we take for granted that the millennial can’t live without.

Somehow unfortunately my generation has forgotten that being a parent sis a full time job. We “collectively” hopefully not you my firmed, have not learned some important things from the old folks. Are you still with me?

The first lesson is that love is sacrificial. True love, real love, is not an emotion. It is not a passing feeling, or equal to I heart you!

Love is expressed more that it was said in my parent’s generation. Who remembers the Encyclopedia Britannica, the World Book and maybe even the Bible Stories series of books our parents “invested” in so we would have chance to go to college or get good grades so we could get a job and get out on our own? Those books were our Google. Remember the dictionary? My parents worked two jobs so that we had a house, clothes to wear and expensive breakfast cereal to eat on Saturday mornings. Named brand cereal too, like Capt Crunch, Sugar Pops, Rice Kris pies….

They made payments on the encyclopedia. When someone got a new car in the neighborhood or family it was a big deal Folks celebrated with you.

Oh and by the way, there where guns and live ammunition in the house. There were military arms brought home from the wars they served in or bought at pawn shops to protect the home. My maternal grandmother, mother of the church, deaconess, preparer of Holy Communion on second Sundays, kept a loaded single barrel Sears and Roebuck shotgun behind the kitchen woodstove, all my life. Nobody touched it. Nobody died from it being there, unsecured. My paternal grandmother was a little rough around the edges, she kept a loaded Belgium Browning A5 shotgun in her bedroom over the door and a concealed weapon, and an Italian handled switchblade knife in her bra…

Click here to read the entire article at Black Man with a Gun.

Keep Gov’t Local – Excerpt from “Human Scale Revisted”

On the ability of local communities to better respond to issues than state or federal government, from the book Human Scale Revisited by Kirkpatrick Sale:

To find the government as the root cause of such problems, of course, should not surprise us by now: it is in the nature of the state, we have repeatedly seen, to create the problems that it then steps in to correct and uses to justify its existence. But there is a further point to the process that is pertinent here; in the words of British philosopher Michael Taylor:

The state…in order to expand domestic markets, facilitate common defence, and so on, encourages the weakening of local communities in favour of the national community. In doing so, it relieves individuals of the necessity to cooperate voluntarily amongst themselves on a local basis, making them more dependent upon the state. Teh result is that altruism and cooperative behavior gradually decay. The state is thereby strengthened and made more effective in its work of weakening the local community.

This is important: it is exactly this that accounts for the inability of the Lake Michigan communities to regulate their pollution problems in the first place. Communities that were in control of their own affairs, whose citizens had an effective voice in the matters that touched their lives, would almost certainly choose not to pollute their own waters or to permit local industries to do so, out of sheer self-interest if not out of good sense — particularly if they were small, ecology-minded, economically stable, and democratically governed. (And if by some chance a community or two did go on polluting, resistant to all appeals, their toxic effects would likely not overstrain the lake’s ability to absorb them.) It is this process, moreover, that accounts for the failure of the concerned majority to have cleaned up the pollution once it existed. Individuals and communities conditioned to cooperative and federative behavior, particularly those whose interests are greatest (in this case fishing villages, towns with bathing beaches, beach clubs, marinas, lakefront hotels, boardwalk businesses), would almost certainly work out, and pay for, a way to restore the lake — especially if there were no federal or state governments to siphon off the locally generated money through taxation.

As with pollution, so with the other public services of the state. There is a not a one of them, not one, that has not in the past been the province of the community or some agency within the community (family, church, guild) and that has been taken on the state only because it first destroyed that province. There is not a one of them that could not be re-absorbed by a community in control of its own destiny and able to see what its natural humanitarian obligations, its humanitarian opportunities, would be. Invariably hen the state has taken over the job of supplying blood for hospitals, there is a shortage, even when it offers money; the United States now gets much of its blood from overseas. Invariably when a community is asked to do it voluntarily, and when the community perceives that the blood is to be used for its own needs, there is a surplus. This is not magic altruism, the by-product of utopia; this is perceived self-interest, community-interest, made possible (capable of being perceived by the individual) only at the human scale.

Indeed there is not one public service, not one, that could not be better supplied at the local level, where the problem is understood best and quickest, the solutions are most accessible, the refinements and adjustments are easiest to make, the monitoring is most convenient. If it be said that there is not sufficient expertise in a small community to tackle some of the complicated problems that come along, the answer is surely not a standing pool of federal talent but an appeal throughout neighboring communities and regions for a person or group who can come in to do the job. (This is in fact what the federal government itself most often does today, hence the great reliance on contract firms and $650-a-day consultants.) If it be said that some problems are too big for a small community to hand along (an epidemic, a forest fire, or some widespread disaster), the anser is clearly not the intervention of some outside force but the ready cooperation of the communities and regions involved, whose own self-interest, even survival, is after all at stake. And if it be said that there is not enough money in a small community to handle such problems — well, where do you suppose the government got its money in the first place, and how much more might there be in local pockets if $500 billion of it weren’t spent by Washington, $200 billion by state capitals, every year?

I cannot imagine a world without problems and crises, without social and economic dislocations demanding some public response. I see no difficulty, however, in imagining a world where those are responded to at the immediate human level by those who perceive the immediate human effects and control their own immediate human destinies.

Mitch Meeske Benefit, May 5, 2018

Saturday, May 5th 5:00pm – 11:00pm
Prosser Eagles1205 Bennett Ave, Prosser, WA 99350 
 mitchThe Prosser Eagles are honored to be working with the friends & family of Mitch Meeske to host a Benefit to assist the family with their medical expenses. Eagles will be holding a dinner, silent auction, live auction, and raffle.

Dinner starts at 5:00pm – Tacos, rice, & beans $10.00 a plate.

Live Auction starts at 7pm

Raffle drawing is at 7:30, tickets are $5.00 and can be purchased at the club.

There will also be tables of silent auction items to bid on as well.

1st – Pit Boss 8-1 Wood Pellet Grill ($550 Value)
2nd – Fire Pit & Camping Accessories: 2 Chairs & Camp Stove ($375 Value)
3rd – RTIC Cooler ($200 Value)

Must be 18 or older to purchase, need not be present to win. Purchase of dinner tickets in advance is preferred so that an accurate headcount can be achieved. Please call or stop by the Eagles to get dinner tickets.

Fees/Admission:
$10 Dinner plate of tacos, rice and beans
$5 raffle tickets

Prosser Eagles Facebook page

Prosser Eagles phone: (509) 786-1844