WA 16th Dist. Town Halls, March 23, 2019

From Rep. Bill Jenkin’s office:

Greetings from Olympia!

I’m hosting a trio of town hall events with my seatmate, Rep. Skyler Rude, around the 16th District. This Saturday, March 23, is your opportunity to discuss with us your opinions, concerns and questions about the legislation being debated in Olympia. We will begin each event with a brief legislative update, and then dive into our Q&A session. There is a lot going on and we look forward to this time with you. Please join us at the following locations:

Prosser

Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Where: Walter Clore Wine and Country Culinary Center (2140A Wine Country Road)

Walla Walla

Time: 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Walla Walla Community College – Performing Arts Auditorium (500 Tausick Way)

Dayton

Time: 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Where: Columbia County Youth Building (102 Fairgrounds Lane)

If you cannot attend these events, or would like to submit a question or comment beforehand, please contact my office.

I look forward to seeing you on Saturday!

Sincerely,

Bill Jenkin

Benton County, WA Road Closure Update, Feb. 12, 2019

According to Benton County:

Benton County Road Closures as of 4:30 PM, Tuesday, February 12, 2019.

The following roads are now open:

  • Clodfelter Road
  • Locust Grove from I-82 to Plymouth Road
  • Finley Road from SR 397 to end of asphalt (approx. 2.5 miles)
  • Nine Canyon Road from SR 397 to Lower Blair Road
  • Sellards RD from Travis to Plymouth Road

The following roads are still closed:

  • Lincoln Grade
  • McBee Road
  • Nine Canyon from Lower Blair to South end of County Road
  • Sellards RD from SR 221 to Travis Road
  • Ward Gap

Closures will last until further notice. Ward Gap Road, Lincoln Grade, and McBee Road will be closed until the snow melts off. Our crews are unable to get plows into these areas due to significant drifts.

Click here to open the Benton County, WA Road Closure Map. It is supposed to be updated regularly.

KIMA: Winter Storm Kills 1600 Dairy Cows in Region

From KIMA news. Stories of hardships caused by the recent storm continue to come:

YAKIMA, Wash.– Farmers have been devastated across the Yakima Valley, as strong winds of up to 80 miles per hour, and cold conditions have killed about 1,600 cows according to the Yakima Valley Dairy Farmers Association.

Yakima Valley Dairy Farmers are continuing to prepare as more snow is expected to hit the Valley, they’re adding extra bedding to insulate areas for cows to lay in, adding extra feed, and thawing water troughs with hot water.

“Without our employees, there’s no way we, or our cows could survive this storm,” Alyssa Haak , a dairy farmer in Prosser said. “To shield our cows from the wind we stacked straw bales to create a windbreak for our cows. I give a lot of credit to our milk truck drivers, too. Without their bravery, we wouldn’t be able to get our milk off the farm.”

Another farmer in Grandview says he’s been working around the clock to make sure his cows are being protected from the elements.

“These have been the worst few days of my life,” he said. “We’re just devastated. I don’t think we’ve ever been hit with weather like this.”

With severe winter weather continuing to occur in in eastern Washington throughout the next week, dairy farmers are assessing their current losses and preparing for the next round of snow and wind.

Farmers say that they are working together to help each other through these tough times.

Markus Rollinger, a Sunnyside dairy farmer stated, “Saturday was brutal. We put in a 36-hour day, but we’ve been fortunate. I’ve spent a lot of time helping my fellow dairy farmers and supporting what they’re going through,” Markus says. “My brother and I are trying to keep roads plowed for our employees and the milk trucks.”

Governor Inslee has declared a state of emergency for the state of Washington, which the farmers are hoping will lead to further assistance.

The dairy farmers say that they continue to cope with these conditions and over the next few days will be touch and go as they assess the damage and losses to their farm.

2019 Benton County Sheriff’s Citizen Academy Accepting Applications

The Benton County Sheriff’s Office is now accepting applications for the Spring Citizen Academy. The Sheriff’s Office offers this free 5-week Citizen Academy for the public to be held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 6:00-8:00 pm. The Academy teaches the public about law enforcement and the day-to-day operations of the department. Most classes are held at the Benton County Health Department with the exception of two tours.

Classes include:

  • Patrol Procedures and Traffic Enforcement
  • Detectives and Narcotics
  • School Resource Officer
  • Evidence Collection
  • Crime Scene Investigation
  • Sex Offender Program
  • SWAT Team
  • Crime Analyst
  • Gangs
  • K-9
  • Boat Patrol
  • Corrections
  • Tours of Benton County Jail, Justice Center, and Coroner’s Office
  • Plus more

Classes start Tuesday, April 30th, 2019. Applications must be received by April 16th.

Click here to download a PDF application to fill out.

Rally for Your Rights, Olympia, Jan. 18th, 2019

A rally in support of “the right of the individual citizen to bear arms” (WA state Constitution) will be held on the Capitol Campus Friday, January 18th. The rally will be held on the north steps of the Legislative Building and will begin at 9 a.m., ending at 12 noon. The rally is sponsored by the Gun Rights Coalition.

From The Olympian:

A gun rights rally next week on the Capitol Campus is expected to draw 150 people, including some with guns.

Rally for Your Rights will take place from 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 18 on the north steps of the Legislative Building. The event is organized by the Gun Rights Coalition and is permitted by the Department of Enterprise Services.

State law allows people to openly carry guns in most public areas, including on the Capitol Campus. Washington State Patrol will be at the scene that day.

 

Yakima Herald: Trained Volunteers May Be the First to Reach Victims

The Yakima Herald had an article on CERT volunteers and training last year – In an emergency, trained volunteers may be the first to reach victims. Yakima County has an active CERT program. Benton County does not. If you live in Yakima County, you can take advantage of the training from CERT. They do a “CERT Basic Course” for volunteers which includes:

Disaster Preparedness: Addresses hazards specific to the community. Materials cover actions that participants and their families take before, during and after a disaster as well as an overview of CERT and local laws governing volunteers.

Fire Suppression: Covers fire chemistry, hazardous materials, fire hazards and fire suppression strategies. However, the thrust of this session is the safe use of fire extinguishers, controlling utilities and extinguishing a small fire.

Medical Operations Part I: Participants practice diagnosing and treating airway obstruction, bleeding and shock by using simple triage and rapid treatment techniques.

Medical Operations Part II: Covers evaluating patients by doing a head to toe assessment, establishing a medical treatment area and performing basic first aid.

Light Search and Rescue Operations: Participants learn about search and rescue planning, size-up, search techniques, rescue techniques and rescuer safety.

Psychology and Team Organization: Covers signs and symptoms that might be experienced by the disaster victim and workers, and addresses CERT organization and management.

Course Review and Disaster Simulation: Participants review and practice the skills that they have learned during the previous six sessions in a disaster activity.

Excerpt from the Yakima Herald article:

If an earthquake, volcanic eruption, wildfire or flood hits the Yakima Valley, you might not see firefighters or paramedics in your neighborhood for a while.

The experience in other disasters has shown that professional first responders can be overwhelmed as they deal with urgent needs, or they might not be able to get to where people need help because roads and bridges are out.

Instead, help for your neighborhood may come from people in green vests and hard hats like Paul Jenkins, a volunteer coordinator with the county’s Community Emergency Response Team

The team has quarterly training exercises and participates in events such as a recent drill at the Yakima Air Terminal, as well as activations of the county’s emergency operations center in Union Gap.

While some people may think that firefighters, police and paramedics will be on the scene right away when a disaster strikes, Jenkins said they could easily be swamped with calls for help in an emergency, or the nature of the disaster might cut off access for a time.

Jenkins has been called out for flooding in West Valley, wildfire near Moxee and the Miriam Fire, where he helped distribute literature and provide security at the site. He was also sent to Outlook to help get information and bottled water to residents after an overflowing manure pond contaminated local wells.

While there are 60 people currently trained, Ward and Jenkins would like to see more people get involved, as it will give them skills to cope in a disaster…

Happy Thanksgiving!

Wishing you a happy and prayerful Thanksgiving.

Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all ye lands.

Serve the LORD with gladness:
come before his presence with singing.

Know ye that the LORD he is God:
it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves;
we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

Enter into his gates with thanksgiving,
and into his courts with praise:
be thankful unto him, and bless his name.

For the LORD is good;
his mercy is everlasting;
and his truth endureth to all generations.

– Psalm 100

HHSS Turkey Shoot, Sat. Nov. 17th

sportsmanrangeHorse Heaven Sportsmen Society invites you to compete for your chance to win one of many Turkey and Ham Thanks Giving dinner.

The competition is for all age groups and fun for the entire family. We will shoot .22 Long Rifle from off hand standing position for your chance to win a complete Thanks Giving Meal.

Rifles and ammunition are provided. Bring your own .22’s (scoped rifles are restricted to 50yd targets only). Prizes awarded after each round.

Cost: $1 ages 16 & under, $2 for Adults (bring small bills if possible).

Hot BBQ Food and drinks served (donations gladly accepted).

Horse Heaven Sportsman RangeDump Road, Prosser, Washington 99350  

Veterans Day 2018 in the Lower Valley

Veterans Day events in the Lower Yakima Valley.

West Richland – Veterans Day Parade, downtown – Van Giesen St., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018 at 9:30 AM. Chili feed at Flat Top Park Pavilion following parade – 4749 W Van Giesen.

Prosser – Veterans Day Parade, downtown, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Prosser – Thank-You Breakfast for Veterans & Their Families, Walter Clore Wine & Culinary Center, Saturday, Nov. 10, 7 – 11 AM

Grandview –Annual Veterans Day “SOS” Brunch, Grandview Community Center, Sat., Nov. 10, 10:00 AM

Yakima – Veterans Day Parade, Yakima Ave, Sun., Nov. 11, 10:45 AM

Click here to visit Military.com’s list of 2018 Veterans Day discounts on restaurants, goods, services and events.

Click here for a list of veteran resources at militaryveteranproject.org.

 

Forward Observer: Community Security eBook

Sam Culper at Forward Observer has written a short (sixteen pages) ebook on Intelligence and Community Security. It’s a ‘quick start’ guide to understanding intelligence for community security and emergency preparedness.

The writing is on the wall. It couldn’t be more clear.

Our power grids are critically vulnerable.

“As an almost 30-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force with leadership experience in intelligence and cyber warfare, and as a current member of the U.S. House of Representatives Homeland Security Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection, I know we are highly vulnerable to a cyber-attack on our electric grid.

Such an attack could have devastating, long-term consequences for our economy, our national security – for our very way of life.”

Those are the recent words of Don Bacon (R-NE), a retired Air Force Brigadier General who was in charge of the Air Force’s Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) strategy program.

This “news” about the power grid shouldn’t be news to anyone, but it drives home a very good point…

If you care about your wife, children, family, and neighborhood, you should spend some time preparing for the effects of a cyber attack like the one Rep. Bacon describes.

The emergency preparedness community is so quick to focus on “bullets, beans, and band-aids” that they often overlook the value of local intelligence gathering.

Intelligence is probably the single-most overlooked aspect of preparedness, yet it should be a central part of your preparedness plans.

I’ll state the case:

If you’re concerned about a cyber attack or a grid-down event, you’re not actually preparing for those events. You’re preparing for the effects of those events.

But how do you know what the specific local effects will be, and how can you be sure?

Only intelligence can inform you of the second- and third-order effects of an event of this magnitude.

Only intelligence can inform you of very specific threats you may experience in the area.

Only intelligence can inform you of the likelihood that your neighborhood will suffer from looters, even worse criminals, and further systems disruption.

Bullets, beans, and band-aids will get you through periods of emergency, but they can’t inform your expectations of what will happen in the future.

That’s the value of intelligence…

Sam Culper says to share the ebook far and wide.  Click here to download Forward Observer’s Intelligence & Community Security ebook. It may only be freely available for a limited time.

So here’s what I want you to do…

PRINT IT.

Forward this email to your friends.

Give the book away.

Read it this weekend.

Have your friends read it this weekend.

And then act on it.

For the rest of this weekend, you can access the book here.

Vote Out WA State Senator Curtis “Tax” King

From Glen Morgan at We the Governed:

In Washington State’s 14th legislative district, a tax rebellion is growing against Republican State Senator Curtis King, acknowledged architect, author, and champion of Washington State’s most recent gas tax increase.  In November, local voters will have an opportunity to demonstrate whether this rebellion will have an impact at the ballot box.

Sen. Curtis King, R-14
Sen. Curtis King (R-14) was very happy about his gas tax bill

Washington’s 14th legislative district is mostly rural containing all of Klickitat and Skamania Counties, as well as a large portion of Yakima County and a small slice of Clark County.  The City of Yakima is the largest city in this legislative district.  Senator Curtis King was born in Yakima, and 2016 is the first re-election where he has an opponent on the ballot.  King was originally elected to the position when the previous state senator retired early and King defeated the appointed incumbent in 2007.  He was elected in 2008 and 2012 unchallenged by anyone.  This year is different.

King’s unpopular tax hike invites challenge

In 2016, King faces an opponent from his own party.  Challenger Amanda Richards is a 14-year resident from Klickitat County running as an “Independant GOP.”  King’s well publicized championing of the largest gas tax increase in Washington State history (SB 5987) was a large part of the motivation for Richards to challenge him this election year.

As chairman of the State Senate Transportation Committee, Senator King was able to push through the 11.9 cents per gallon tax increase, which ensures Washington State drivers pay the second highest gas tax in the nation at 49.4 cents per gallon (Pennsylvania’s drivers pay 50.3 cents per gallon).  When the Federal gas tax of 18.4 cents per gallon is included, Washington State’s drivers pay 67.8 cents per gallon of fuel every time they fill up at the pump.  This might be chump change to politicians and bureaucrats in Olympia, but to average citizens it adds up quickly to take a real bite out of a family’s budget.

Unlike most states, Washington voters have an opportunity to vote on tax increases (thanks to initiative 960).  These votes are called “advisory votes” and they serve as an opportunity for voters to register their support or opposition to tax increases passed by the legislature and the governor.  Based on the advisory vote totals from 2015 (64% voted to repeal the tax increase state-wide) , voters strongly opposed this gas tax hike and in Senator King’s district, the opposition was even more pronounced at( 77% to repeal in Yakima, 76% to repeal in Skamania, 75% to repeal in Klickitat) .

King knows better than the children who voted for him

Throwing fuel on this fire of tax hike opposition, Senator King went on a King5 interview in February of last year and compared the voters in his district to “children” who need discipline.  Not surprisingly this quote has fueled some of the growing opposition to Senator King, and this audio clip was featured in a video created by the Richards campaign

Read the entire article at We the Governed by clicking here.

Rep. David Taylor Loses Primary Amid Poor Republican Showing Statewide

At the current, unofficial count, Rep. David Taylor appears to have lost in the August 2018 primary. According to an article at We the Governed, Republicans showed poorly statewide, and many traditionally strong Republican districts had weak results.

The initial results in a variety of districts around the state – largely considered Republican leaning, but showing Republican weakness last night should be motivating some serious soul searching and galvanizing Republican efforts around the state.  Here is a review of a few of these races (please note direct links to election results will change as more late mail-in votes are counted):

In the 15th Legislative District (Yakima County), this district will remain in Republican control, but an intramural fight within the Republican Party has resulted in poor results for the Republican caucus and for everyone who values freedom. In a five way primary runoff for the house seat, longtime Republican incumbent David Taylor appears to have missed surviving the primary results with a disappointing election night return of 20.42%.  This result is partly due to a longtime well-known grudge against Representative Taylor by nearby Republican Senator Curtis King (LD-14) who has repeatedly recruited candidates to

Senator Curtis King (14th LD)

run against Taylor.  Baring an unusual shift in ballot returns over the next few days, it looks like King succeeded with former Democrat and recently converted Republican Jeremie Dufault who will beat Democrat candidate AJ Cooper in the fall.  Representative Taylor was one of the most knowledgeable legislators of either party in Olympia when it came to land use, property rights, planning, and how the hodgepodge of land use laws functioned in Washington State.  Losing him from the legislature eliminates a desperately needed knowledgeable, freedom-oriented voice in the legislature.  Senator King didn’t like Taylor’s criticism of King’s various gas tax proposals and King’s endless campaign to increase the tax burden on Washington State citizens.  This is yet again another example of how Republican intramural fighting will help the Democratic Party agenda of higher taxes next year.

Prosser Kiwanis Organizational Meeting, June 21, 2018

There will be an organizational meeting for starting a Prosser, WA Kiwanis Club on Thursday, June 21st, 2018 at 6:00 pm. Bring a friend, coworker, or family member to help start the Prosser chapter and improve the community.

Location:

Best Western Plus

The Inn at Horse Heaven Hills

259 Merlot Drive

Prosser, WA

Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to improving the world one child and one community at a time. Every club is committed to doing service that is close to its hear and crucial to its community. Local clubs determine their own projects, and the best way to meet the needs of their community. Learn about and serve your community, make new friends and develop new relationships,  and do it all as a fun team; join Kiwanis!

Interested in finding out more? Contact Bill Glenn, Pacific Northwest District of Kiwanis International at mrradiodad@aol.com.

Click here to download a printable pdf flyer.