HHSS Turkey Shoot, Sat. Nov. 17th

sportsmanrangeHorse Heaven Sportsmen Society invites you to compete for your chance to win one of many Turkey and Ham Thanks Giving dinner.

The competition is for all age groups and fun for the entire family. We will shoot .22 Long Rifle from off hand standing position for your chance to win a complete Thanks Giving Meal.

Rifles and ammunition are provided. Bring your own .22’s (scoped rifles are restricted to 50yd targets only). Prizes awarded after each round.

Cost: $1 ages 16 & under, $2 for Adults (bring small bills if possible).

Hot BBQ Food and drinks served (donations gladly accepted).

Horse Heaven Sportsman RangeDump Road, Prosser, Washington 99350  

Veterans Day 2018 in the Lower Valley

Veterans Day events in the Lower Yakima Valley.

West Richland – Veterans Day Parade, downtown – Van Giesen St., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018 at 9:30 AM. Chili feed at Flat Top Park Pavilion following parade – 4749 W Van Giesen.

Prosser – Veterans Day Parade, downtown, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Prosser – Thank-You Breakfast for Veterans & Their Families, Walter Clore Wine & Culinary Center, Saturday, Nov. 10, 7 – 11 AM

Grandview –Annual Veterans Day “SOS” Brunch, Grandview Community Center, Sat., Nov. 10, 10:00 AM

Yakima – Veterans Day Parade, Yakima Ave, Sun., Nov. 11, 10:45 AM

Click here to visit Military.com’s list of 2018 Veterans Day discounts on restaurants, goods, services and events.

Click here for a list of veteran resources at militaryveteranproject.org.

 

Forward Observer: Community Security eBook

Sam Culper at Forward Observer has written a short (sixteen pages) ebook on Intelligence and Community Security. It’s a ‘quick start’ guide to understanding intelligence for community security and emergency preparedness.

The writing is on the wall. It couldn’t be more clear.

Our power grids are critically vulnerable.

“As an almost 30-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force with leadership experience in intelligence and cyber warfare, and as a current member of the U.S. House of Representatives Homeland Security Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection, I know we are highly vulnerable to a cyber-attack on our electric grid.

Such an attack could have devastating, long-term consequences for our economy, our national security – for our very way of life.”

Those are the recent words of Don Bacon (R-NE), a retired Air Force Brigadier General who was in charge of the Air Force’s Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) strategy program.

This “news” about the power grid shouldn’t be news to anyone, but it drives home a very good point…

If you care about your wife, children, family, and neighborhood, you should spend some time preparing for the effects of a cyber attack like the one Rep. Bacon describes.

The emergency preparedness community is so quick to focus on “bullets, beans, and band-aids” that they often overlook the value of local intelligence gathering.

Intelligence is probably the single-most overlooked aspect of preparedness, yet it should be a central part of your preparedness plans.

I’ll state the case:

If you’re concerned about a cyber attack or a grid-down event, you’re not actually preparing for those events. You’re preparing for the effects of those events.

But how do you know what the specific local effects will be, and how can you be sure?

Only intelligence can inform you of the second- and third-order effects of an event of this magnitude.

Only intelligence can inform you of very specific threats you may experience in the area.

Only intelligence can inform you of the likelihood that your neighborhood will suffer from looters, even worse criminals, and further systems disruption.

Bullets, beans, and band-aids will get you through periods of emergency, but they can’t inform your expectations of what will happen in the future.

That’s the value of intelligence…

Sam Culper says to share the ebook far and wide.  Click here to download Forward Observer’s Intelligence & Community Security ebook. It may only be freely available for a limited time.

So here’s what I want you to do…

PRINT IT.

Forward this email to your friends.

Give the book away.

Read it this weekend.

Have your friends read it this weekend.

And then act on it.

For the rest of this weekend, you can access the book here.

Vote Out WA State Senator Curtis “Tax” King

From Glen Morgan at We the Governed:

In Washington State’s 14th legislative district, a tax rebellion is growing against Republican State Senator Curtis King, acknowledged architect, author, and champion of Washington State’s most recent gas tax increase.  In November, local voters will have an opportunity to demonstrate whether this rebellion will have an impact at the ballot box.

Sen. Curtis King, R-14
Sen. Curtis King (R-14) was very happy about his gas tax bill

Washington’s 14th legislative district is mostly rural containing all of Klickitat and Skamania Counties, as well as a large portion of Yakima County and a small slice of Clark County.  The City of Yakima is the largest city in this legislative district.  Senator Curtis King was born in Yakima, and 2016 is the first re-election where he has an opponent on the ballot.  King was originally elected to the position when the previous state senator retired early and King defeated the appointed incumbent in 2007.  He was elected in 2008 and 2012 unchallenged by anyone.  This year is different.

King’s unpopular tax hike invites challenge

In 2016, King faces an opponent from his own party.  Challenger Amanda Richards is a 14-year resident from Klickitat County running as an “Independant GOP.”  King’s well publicized championing of the largest gas tax increase in Washington State history (SB 5987) was a large part of the motivation for Richards to challenge him this election year.

As chairman of the State Senate Transportation Committee, Senator King was able to push through the 11.9 cents per gallon tax increase, which ensures Washington State drivers pay the second highest gas tax in the nation at 49.4 cents per gallon (Pennsylvania’s drivers pay 50.3 cents per gallon).  When the Federal gas tax of 18.4 cents per gallon is included, Washington State’s drivers pay 67.8 cents per gallon of fuel every time they fill up at the pump.  This might be chump change to politicians and bureaucrats in Olympia, but to average citizens it adds up quickly to take a real bite out of a family’s budget.

Unlike most states, Washington voters have an opportunity to vote on tax increases (thanks to initiative 960).  These votes are called “advisory votes” and they serve as an opportunity for voters to register their support or opposition to tax increases passed by the legislature and the governor.  Based on the advisory vote totals from 2015 (64% voted to repeal the tax increase state-wide) , voters strongly opposed this gas tax hike and in Senator King’s district, the opposition was even more pronounced at( 77% to repeal in Yakima, 76% to repeal in Skamania, 75% to repeal in Klickitat) .

King knows better than the children who voted for him

Throwing fuel on this fire of tax hike opposition, Senator King went on a King5 interview in February of last year and compared the voters in his district to “children” who need discipline.  Not surprisingly this quote has fueled some of the growing opposition to Senator King, and this audio clip was featured in a video created by the Richards campaign

Read the entire article at We the Governed by clicking here.

Rep. David Taylor Loses Primary Amid Poor Republican Showing Statewide

At the current, unofficial count, Rep. David Taylor appears to have lost in the August 2018 primary. According to an article at We the Governed, Republicans showed poorly statewide, and many traditionally strong Republican districts had weak results.

The initial results in a variety of districts around the state – largely considered Republican leaning, but showing Republican weakness last night should be motivating some serious soul searching and galvanizing Republican efforts around the state.  Here is a review of a few of these races (please note direct links to election results will change as more late mail-in votes are counted):

In the 15th Legislative District (Yakima County), this district will remain in Republican control, but an intramural fight within the Republican Party has resulted in poor results for the Republican caucus and for everyone who values freedom. In a five way primary runoff for the house seat, longtime Republican incumbent David Taylor appears to have missed surviving the primary results with a disappointing election night return of 20.42%.  This result is partly due to a longtime well-known grudge against Representative Taylor by nearby Republican Senator Curtis King (LD-14) who has repeatedly recruited candidates to

Senator Curtis King (14th LD)

run against Taylor.  Baring an unusual shift in ballot returns over the next few days, it looks like King succeeded with former Democrat and recently converted Republican Jeremie Dufault who will beat Democrat candidate AJ Cooper in the fall.  Representative Taylor was one of the most knowledgeable legislators of either party in Olympia when it came to land use, property rights, planning, and how the hodgepodge of land use laws functioned in Washington State.  Losing him from the legislature eliminates a desperately needed knowledgeable, freedom-oriented voice in the legislature.  Senator King didn’t like Taylor’s criticism of King’s various gas tax proposals and King’s endless campaign to increase the tax burden on Washington State citizens.  This is yet again another example of how Republican intramural fighting will help the Democratic Party agenda of higher taxes next year.

Prosser Kiwanis Organizational Meeting, June 21, 2018

There will be an organizational meeting for starting a Prosser, WA Kiwanis Club on Thursday, June 21st, 2018 at 6:00 pm. Bring a friend, coworker, or family member to help start the Prosser chapter and improve the community.

Location:

Best Western Plus

The Inn at Horse Heaven Hills

259 Merlot Drive

Prosser, WA

Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to improving the world one child and one community at a time. Every club is committed to doing service that is close to its hear and crucial to its community. Local clubs determine their own projects, and the best way to meet the needs of their community. Learn about and serve your community, make new friends and develop new relationships,  and do it all as a fun team; join Kiwanis!

Interested in finding out more? Contact Bill Glenn, Pacific Northwest District of Kiwanis International at mrradiodad@aol.com.

Click here to download a printable pdf flyer.

Regular Assembly of the Whole, June 14th, 2018

Please join us at the Patriot barn on June 14th, at 6:30 pm for an LVA barbecue. We will have a short business portion followed by food and fellowship. We ask that everyone bring a side dish and lawn chairs. BBQ chicken will be provided as well as dessert. Also please save the date of Tuesday, June 26th for the Center for Self-Governance screening of the Finicum documentary Dead Man Talking, with Lavoy’s widow Jeanette Finicum. We want to be an encouragement to both of them and their efforts.

Click here to download a printable agenda.

Blanchard: Guide to Parenting

Kenn Blanchard of Black Man with a Gun has written a short essay on parenting responsibility. It’s worth your time to give it a read.

First I want to tip my hat to those successful baby boomers that are now the gray haired group in their seventies.

This generation that survived the Civil Rights era, bussing, political upheavals, World War II, the Nazi Holocaust, fear of the H-Bomb, Korea, Viet Nam, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Watergate, have raised children that have invented the internet, social media, drones, video games, remote control vehicles, cell phones and all the stuff we take for granted that the millennial can’t live without.

Somehow unfortunately my generation has forgotten that being a parent sis a full time job. We “collectively” hopefully not you my firmed, have not learned some important things from the old folks. Are you still with me?

The first lesson is that love is sacrificial. True love, real love, is not an emotion. It is not a passing feeling, or equal to I heart you!

Love is expressed more that it was said in my parent’s generation. Who remembers the Encyclopedia Britannica, the World Book and maybe even the Bible Stories series of books our parents “invested” in so we would have chance to go to college or get good grades so we could get a job and get out on our own? Those books were our Google. Remember the dictionary? My parents worked two jobs so that we had a house, clothes to wear and expensive breakfast cereal to eat on Saturday mornings. Named brand cereal too, like Capt Crunch, Sugar Pops, Rice Kris pies….

They made payments on the encyclopedia. When someone got a new car in the neighborhood or family it was a big deal Folks celebrated with you.

Oh and by the way, there where guns and live ammunition in the house. There were military arms brought home from the wars they served in or bought at pawn shops to protect the home. My maternal grandmother, mother of the church, deaconess, preparer of Holy Communion on second Sundays, kept a loaded single barrel Sears and Roebuck shotgun behind the kitchen woodstove, all my life. Nobody touched it. Nobody died from it being there, unsecured. My paternal grandmother was a little rough around the edges, she kept a loaded Belgium Browning A5 shotgun in her bedroom over the door and a concealed weapon, and an Italian handled switchblade knife in her bra…

Click here to read the entire article at Black Man with a Gun.

Keep Gov’t Local – Excerpt from “Human Scale Revisted”

On the ability of local communities to better respond to issues than state or federal government, from the book Human Scale Revisited by Kirkpatrick Sale:

To find the government as the root cause of such problems, of course, should not surprise us by now: it is in the nature of the state, we have repeatedly seen, to create the problems that it then steps in to correct and uses to justify its existence. But there is a further point to the process that is pertinent here; in the words of British philosopher Michael Taylor:

The state…in order to expand domestic markets, facilitate common defence, and so on, encourages the weakening of local communities in favour of the national community. In doing so, it relieves individuals of the necessity to cooperate voluntarily amongst themselves on a local basis, making them more dependent upon the state. Teh result is that altruism and cooperative behavior gradually decay. The state is thereby strengthened and made more effective in its work of weakening the local community.

This is important: it is exactly this that accounts for the inability of the Lake Michigan communities to regulate their pollution problems in the first place. Communities that were in control of their own affairs, whose citizens had an effective voice in the matters that touched their lives, would almost certainly choose not to pollute their own waters or to permit local industries to do so, out of sheer self-interest if not out of good sense — particularly if they were small, ecology-minded, economically stable, and democratically governed. (And if by some chance a community or two did go on polluting, resistant to all appeals, their toxic effects would likely not overstrain the lake’s ability to absorb them.) It is this process, moreover, that accounts for the failure of the concerned majority to have cleaned up the pollution once it existed. Individuals and communities conditioned to cooperative and federative behavior, particularly those whose interests are greatest (in this case fishing villages, towns with bathing beaches, beach clubs, marinas, lakefront hotels, boardwalk businesses), would almost certainly work out, and pay for, a way to restore the lake — especially if there were no federal or state governments to siphon off the locally generated money through taxation.

As with pollution, so with the other public services of the state. There is a not a one of them, not one, that has not in the past been the province of the community or some agency within the community (family, church, guild) and that has been taken on the state only because it first destroyed that province. There is not a one of them that could not be re-absorbed by a community in control of its own destiny and able to see what its natural humanitarian obligations, its humanitarian opportunities, would be. Invariably hen the state has taken over the job of supplying blood for hospitals, there is a shortage, even when it offers money; the United States now gets much of its blood from overseas. Invariably when a community is asked to do it voluntarily, and when the community perceives that the blood is to be used for its own needs, there is a surplus. This is not magic altruism, the by-product of utopia; this is perceived self-interest, community-interest, made possible (capable of being perceived by the individual) only at the human scale.

Indeed there is not one public service, not one, that could not be better supplied at the local level, where the problem is understood best and quickest, the solutions are most accessible, the refinements and adjustments are easiest to make, the monitoring is most convenient. If it be said that there is not sufficient expertise in a small community to tackle some of the complicated problems that come along, the answer is surely not a standing pool of federal talent but an appeal throughout neighboring communities and regions for a person or group who can come in to do the job. (This is in fact what the federal government itself most often does today, hence the great reliance on contract firms and $650-a-day consultants.) If it be said that some problems are too big for a small community to hand along (an epidemic, a forest fire, or some widespread disaster), the anser is clearly not the intervention of some outside force but the ready cooperation of the communities and regions involved, whose own self-interest, even survival, is after all at stake. And if it be said that there is not enough money in a small community to handle such problems — well, where do you suppose the government got its money in the first place, and how much more might there be in local pockets if $500 billion of it weren’t spent by Washington, $200 billion by state capitals, every year?

I cannot imagine a world without problems and crises, without social and economic dislocations demanding some public response. I see no difficulty, however, in imagining a world where those are responded to at the immediate human level by those who perceive the immediate human effects and control their own immediate human destinies.

Mitch Meeske Benefit, May 5, 2018

Saturday, May 5th 5:00pm – 11:00pm
Prosser Eagles1205 Bennett Ave, Prosser, WA 99350 
 mitchThe Prosser Eagles are honored to be working with the friends & family of Mitch Meeske to host a Benefit to assist the family with their medical expenses. Eagles will be holding a dinner, silent auction, live auction, and raffle.

Dinner starts at 5:00pm – Tacos, rice, & beans $10.00 a plate.

Live Auction starts at 7pm

Raffle drawing is at 7:30, tickets are $5.00 and can be purchased at the club.

There will also be tables of silent auction items to bid on as well.

1st – Pit Boss 8-1 Wood Pellet Grill ($550 Value)
2nd – Fire Pit & Camping Accessories: 2 Chairs & Camp Stove ($375 Value)
3rd – RTIC Cooler ($200 Value)

Must be 18 or older to purchase, need not be present to win. Purchase of dinner tickets in advance is preferred so that an accurate headcount can be achieved. Please call or stop by the Eagles to get dinner tickets.

Fees/Admission:
$10 Dinner plate of tacos, rice and beans
$5 raffle tickets

Prosser Eagles Facebook page

Prosser Eagles phone: (509) 786-1844