FEMA Seeks Applicants for Youth Preparedness Council

FEMA is seeking students in 8th, 9th, 10th and 11th grades to apply to join the Youth Preparedness Council.

https://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council

APPLY ONLINE TO JOIN FEMA’S YOUTH PREPAREDNESS COUNCIL

Students in 8th, 9th, 10th, or 11th grade who have engaged in community service, or are interested in emergency preparedness, are encouraged to apply to serve on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s, Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Youth Preparedness Council.

The application is available online. Applicants must complete the application form and submit two letters of recommendation and their academic records.

Applications are due March 31. To start your online application, click here. You can also download the application and submit a PDF copy of the application here.

Youth Preparedness Council

FEMA created the Youth Preparedness Council (YPC) in 2012 to bring together young leaders who are interested in supporting disaster preparedness and making a difference in their communities, by completing disaster preparedness projects nationally and locally. The YPC supports FEMA’s commitment to involve America’s youth in preparedness-related activities. It also provides an avenue to engage young people by taking into account their perspectives, feedback, and opinions.

YPC members meet with FEMA staff throughout their term to provide input on strategies, initiatives, and projects. YPC members also attend the annual YPC Summit in Washington, DC, meet periodically with FEMA representatives, and work to complete a number of emergency preparedness projects.

FEMA: We’ve Failed Miserably at Building Community Preparedness

A FEMA report has found that the federal government’s efforts to build disaster-resilient communities has been a failure for various reasons, including that government is not the best entity to reach out with a message of preparedness. It suggests that encouraging a bottom-up approach may be more effective.

Report: We’ve Failed Miserably at Preparedness

A better approach, a new FEMA Higher Education Program report says, is to develop individual cultures of preparedness from the bottom up that could eventually lead to a more resilient nation…

“We’ve achieved our national preparedness goals when it comes to first responders [as per Presidential Policy Directive 8] but when it comes to preparedness of individual households and communities, we’ve failed,” said Laura Olson, a lead author of the report. “To say we’ve failed it putting it mildly…”

The key difficulty with past approaches is that communities across the country lost trust in the government and therefore, the report says, government is not the best entity to reach out to communities with a message of preparedness.

There must be recognition that there is going to be a cultural difference in communication, whether it be communication between emergency managers and communities or any other entities, and to eliminate assumptions…

Click here to read the entire article at govtech.com.

 

FEMA X: Youth Preparedness Camp, Aug. 2019

From FEMA Region X:

Developed under a youth engagement concept, this six-day, five-night camp, hosted and staffed by camp and emergency management professionals will teach students how to safely assist in the immediate aftermath of a disaster when the professional response may be delayed or limited. Subject matter experts and local emergency responders will support the curriculum delivery and introduce participants to various emergency response professions. As part of the camp program, youth participants will identify and develop a concept for a give-back project where they will utilize their skills to improve preparedness in their communities.

The Region 10 Youth Preparedness Council, made up of high-school aged youth from all four states, will participate in the camp, and help lead their peers throughout the week.

For those selected to participate, FEMA will fund youth participants’ travel costs. It is critical that participants do not make any travel reservations on their own, for FEMA staff will assist with the pre-departure travel voucher process and ensure all required documentation is collected and submitted.

Eligibility

  • Entering 8-12th grade in fall of 2019
  • Reside in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon or Washington
  • U.S. Citizen

Where:

Stanwood, WA 98292

When:

August 18 – 23, 2019

How to Apply:

  • Provide the following information:
    • Name
    • Age
    • Grade entering in fall 2019
    • City
    • State
    • Availability August 18 – 23, 2019
    • Special accommodations (i.e. dietary, physical, mobility, etc.)
  • Answer the following questions:
    1. Why do you want to attend this camp? What do you hope to get out of the experience?
    2. How did you hear about the Youth Preparedness Camp?
    3. Have you been involved in any emergency/disaster preparedness activities or trainings? If so please explain. (If not, that’s ok, you’ll still be considered! Everyone starts somewhere.)
    4. What about disaster preparedness interests you?
    5. How would you like to help your community get better prepared? Some ideas include volunteering with a CERT, volunteering with your local American Red Cross, or starting a preparedness club.
  • Submit your application by the March 15th deadline to fema-r10-communityprep@fema.dhs.gov.

For further information or questions, please contact Ilyssa Plumer – Ilyssa.Plumer@associates.fema.gov or 425-487-4943.

First National Wireless Emergency Alerts Test on Oct. 3rd, 2018

The fourth national Emergency Alert System (EAS) test and first national Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) test will occur on Thursday, October 3rd, 2018 at 11:20am Pacific and 11:18am respectively. This was rescheduled from September because of Hurricane Florence.

From FEMA:

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will conduct a nationwide test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Emergency Alert System (EAS) on the backup date of October 3, 2018 due to ongoing response efforts to Hurricane Florence. The WEA portion of the test commences at 2:18 p.m. EDT, and the EAS portion follows at 2:20 p.m. EDT. The test will assess the operational readiness of the infrastructure for distribution of a national message and determine whether improvements are needed.

The WEA test message will be sent to cell phones that are connected to wireless providers participating in WEA. This is the fourth EAS nationwide test and the first national WEA test. Previous EAS national tests were conducted in November 2011, September 2016,  and September 2017 in collaboration with the FCC, broadcasters, and emergency management officials in recognition of FEMA’s National Preparedness Month.

The EAS is a national public warning system that provides the President with the communications capability to address the nation during a national emergency. The test is made available to EAS participants (i.e., radio and television broadcasters, cable systems, satellite radio and television providers, and wireline video providers) and is scheduled to last approximately one minute. The test message will be similar to regular monthly EAS test messages with which the public is familiar. The EAS message will include a reference to the WEA test:

“THIS IS A TEST of the National Emergency Alert System. This system was developed by broadcast and cable operators in voluntary cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Federal Communications Commission, and local authorities to keep you informed in the event of an emergency. If this had been an actual emergency an official message would have followed the tone alert you heard at the start of this message. A similar wireless emergency alert test message has been sent to all cell phones nationwide. Some cell phones will receive the message; others will not. No action is required.”

Cell towers will broadcast the WEA test for approximately 30 minutes beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT. During this time, WEA compatible cell phones that are switched on, within range of an active cell tower, and whose wireless provider participates in WEA should be capable of receiving the test message. Some cell phones will not receive the test message, and cell phones should only receive the message once. The WEA test message will have a header that reads “Presidential Alert” and text that says:

“THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”

The WEA system is used to warn the public about dangerous weather, missing children, and other critical situations through alerts on cell phones. The national test will use the same special tone and vibration as with all WEA messages (i.e. Tornado Warning, AMBER Alert). Users cannot opt out of the WEA test.

The test was originally planned for September 20, 2018 but has been postponed until October 3, 2018 due to ongoing response efforts to Hurricane Florence.

National Preparedness Month, Week 5, 2017

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

Get involved with your community with groups like the Lower Valley Assembly, CERT teams, Map Your Neighborhood groups or other preparedness groups in your area. Most counties will have an emergency management coordinator who can be contacted for CERT or Map Your Neighborhood (MYN) information. If you can’t find information in your county, you can contact your state emergency management department. In Washington state, that is the Emergency Management Division and you can contact their public education staff for direction to local MYN or CERT resources at at (253) 512-7419 or email public.education@mil.wa.gov. They’ll even help out of staters with MYN material.

Related:

How Churches Can Prepare for Disasters

Red Cross: Community Preparedness

Oath Keepers: Community Preparedness Teams

National Preparedness Month, Week 4, 2017

 

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

Related:
Channel 3 ProjectCommunication Realities

Understanding Survivalist Communications Needs

FEMA: Create Your Family Emergency Communication Plan (pdf)

Signals Intelligence Resources

Prepper Radio Communication 101

What Should an Emergency Plan Include?

National Preparedness Month, Week 3, 2017

Don’t forget to do a neighbor check! Always check with each other in case of emergency. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

Related:

Check Your Neighbours (pdf)

Neighborhood Preparedness (pdf)

Five Steps to Neighborhood Preparedness (pdf)

Prepare Your Neighborhood

OK-HELP Signs

National Preparedness Month, Week 1, 2017

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

Related:

Long Term Water Storage

Myths and Facts of Water Storage

Pool Shock & Bleach for Water Purification

Granular Calcium Hypochlorite

Only use HTH Pool Shock that does not have any algicides or fungicides.  Ingredients should reads CALCIUM hypochlorite and inert ingredients.  Use a brand with at least 73% Hypochlorite.

For this video I used Poolife Turboshock, but feel free to use any brand you wish as long as it fits the perimeters above.

Before you begin mixing any chemicals in any way, please follow basic safety precautions.  Make sure you do this in a ventilated area.  Have plenty of water to dilute any mistakes.  Wear eye protection for splashes.  Lastly always mix the powder into the water NOT the other way around.

Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (HTH) (approximately 1/4 ounce) for each two gallons of water.

The mixture will produce a chlorine solution of approximately 500 mg/L (0.0667632356 oz per US gallon), since the calcium hypochlorite has an available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight.

To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 oz.) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water to be disinfected.

To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the water by pouring it back and forth into containers to add air.

Chlorine Bleach

Common household bleach (unscented) contains a chlorine compound that will disinfect water. The procedure to be followed is usually written on the label. When the necessary procedure is not given, find the percentage of available chlorine on the label and use the information in the following tabulation as a guide.

Available Chlorine Drops per Quart of Clear Water

  • 1% needs 10 Drops
  • 4-6% needs  2 Drops
  • 7-10% needs 1 Drops

(If strength is unknown, add ten drops per quart of water. Double amount of chlorine for cloudy or colored water)

The treated water should be mixed thoroughly and allowed to stand for 30 minutes. The water should have a slight chlorine odor; if not, repeat the dosage and allow the water to stand for an additional 15 minutes.

September Is National Preparedness Month, 2017

Once again National Preparedness Month is at hand. This September, FEMA’s National Preparedness Month (NPM) will focus on planning, with an overarching theme “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can.”

We should all take action to prepare! We are all able to help first responders in our community by training how to respond during an emergency and what to do when disaster strikes — where we live, work, and visit. The goal of NPM is to increase the overall number of individuals, families, and communities that engage in preparedness actions at home, work, business, school, and place of worship.

2017 Weekly Themes

  • Week 1:  September 1-9                        Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends
  • Week 2:  September 10-16                    Plan to Help Your Neighbor and Community
  • Week 3:  September 17-23                    Practice and Build Out Your Plans
  • Week 4:  September 24-30                    Get Involved! Be a Part of Something Larger

In Washington State, prepare in September because October 19th, 2017 is the Great Shake Out.

Two Weeks Ready: Be Prepared. Build Kits. Help Each Other. Download our new brochure. Our thanks to the Seattle Office of Emergency Management for developing this brochure and offering it to us for statewide customization.

NEW! Download our drop, cover and hold earthquake scenarios map.

Map Your Neighborhood works.

You don’t have to do it all at once. Prepare in a Year!

Sign up for ShakeOut!

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