President Trump Pardons Hammonds

From Redoubt News, PARDON for Dwight and Steven Hammond.

Shocking The Conscience: The Hammond Story

Today, President Donald J. Trump signed Executive Grants of Clemency (Full Pardons) for Dwight Lincoln Hammond, Jr., and his son, Steven Hammond.  The Hammonds are multi-generation cattle ranchers in Oregon imprisoned in connection with a fire that leaked onto a small portion of neighboring public grazing land.  The evidence at trial regarding the Hammonds’ responsibility for the fire was conflicting, and the jury acquitted them on most of the charges.

At the Hammonds’ original sentencing, the judge noted that they are respected in the community and that imposing the mandatory minimum, 5-year prison sentence would “shock the conscience” and be “grossly disproportionate to the severity” of their conduct.  As a result, the judge imposed significantly lesser sentences.  The previous administration, however, filed an overzealous appeal that resulted in the Hammonds being sentenced to five years in prison.  This was unjust.

Dwight Hammond is now 76 years old and has served approximately three years in prison.  Steven Hammond is 49 and has served approximately four years in prison.  They have also paid $400,000 to the United States to settle a related civil suit.  The Hammonds are devoted family men, respected contributors to their local community, and have widespread support from their neighbors, local law enforcement, and farmers and ranchers across the West.  Justice is overdue for Dwight and Steven Hammond, both of whom are entirely deserving of these Grants of Executive Clemency.

For a history of the harassment endured by the Hammonds, see this article at The Conservative Treehouse.

Prosser Montecito Fire, June 27, 2018

A fire that started near Montecito Estates in SW Prosser, WA has burned up the Horse Heaven Hills and into the wheat fields to the south. Early on authorities evacuated housing on the hillsides to the west of Montecito Estates. After a wind change, the fire headed back east and the Painted Hills area was evacuated. There is a Red Cross Shelter open at Housel Middle School for evacuees. More than 1,500 acres have burned as of 11:30 pm on the 27th. Fire fighting assets continue to arrive.

Update 1: As of approximately 12:15 am, June 28th, the fire is 40% contained. Officials believe between 1,500 and 2,000 acres have burned. Crews hope to achieve  100% containment by Thursday evening, the 28th.

Update 2: As of 6:00 am, June 28th, the fire is 80-90% contained and evacuation orders have been lifted.

Looking down at burn on top of Horse Heaven Hills. The fire burned into wheat fields. Date: 6/28/18 Photo Courtesy of Jim Willard

TACDA: The Real Risks of Fire

From The American Civil Defense Association’s blog,

firemen at housefire

Fire Safety and Survival

There are over 360,000 house fires in the United States every year with a substantial number of injuries and deaths. Eighty percent of the deaths and injuries occur in residential structures, with most of those fatalities occurring while those people are asleep. We can reduce the risk of death or injuries by fire through understanding how and where fires start and how to prevent the fires and ensure prompt notification if a fire occurs.

Studies of fires during emergency situations show a substantial increased risk because of the frequency and severity of fires when individuals and families are using cooking and heating methods that are less familiar and more hazardous than they normally use. The principles and methods for preventing fires and protecting ourselves apply both in our everyday lives and emergency situations.

Asphyxiation, or lack of oxygen, causes most fatalities in fires…

The most important pieces of fire equipment for protecting the people in the house are the smoke, heat, and carbon monoxide detectors. The people in the house must rely almost entirely on the detectors while they sleep. As stated earlier in this article, the lack of oxygen kills or incapacitates most victims in their sleep and they die in their beds with no chance to escape.

The most disturbing information about the common smoke detectors in most homes is that they do not work in a timely fashion in many actual fires. The documentation that accompanies most ionizing smoke detectors indicate that they will not work in up to 35% of all fires. There is also a substantial amount of information enumerating the situations and types of fires where the detectors would not be expected to work that seem designed to limit the amount of liability for the manufacturers…

The images we see on television and in the movies with bright flames of a house on fire with people moving around inside the house and trying to rescue someone are very misleading. Most actual house fires create an environment with thick smoke so that you cannot see anything and acrid and toxic smoke, where an individual cannot maintain consciousness for more than a few seconds. We need to prepare to survive by minimizing the risk of a fire starting with installing the appropriate alarm equipment in place to ensure that we can escape during the early stages while it is possible.

Click here to read the article in its entirety at TACDA.