Doom and Bloom: Dengue Fever – A Rising Pandemic

The Altons at Doom and Bloom Medical have an article up on Dengue Fever , its current pandemic status, symptoms, treatment and precautions.

 

  • aedes aegypti mosquito

    Singapore dengue outbreak: Nearly 9000 cases through July – Outbreak News Today

    Nicaragua declares alert over dengue fever – Washington Post

    Bangladesh grapples with country’s worst dengue outbreak – Miami Herald

    Three headlines about Dengue Fever this year? No, actually they’re all headlines just from one day: Aug 1st, 2019. Dengue fever is a true pandemic, with community wide outbreaks in various regions throughout the world. Indeed, rates of Dengue infection are thought to have increased greatly since 1960 due to encroaching civilization and population growth in warmer regions. As a resident of South Florida, I believe that the development of residential air conditioning around that time may have precipitated the explosion in potential victims.

    rash in dengue patient

    What is Dengue fever? It’s an infection caused by a virus that’s transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. If you live between latitude 35 degrees north and 35 degrees south, and lower than 3000 feet elevation, you’re in Dengue territory.

    And you’re not alone. An estimated 400 million people get infected with the Dengue virus every year. Luckily for the grand majority, they don’t even know they have it. 96 million cases, however, aren’t so fortunate and develop sickness.

    The mosquito in question is the Aedes Aegypti, but other species may possibly spread it. A mosquito bites a human with the Dengue virus and becomes infected. It doesn’t get sick, but the virus is now in its saliva for life. The mosquito passes Dengue onto the next human through its next bite.

    Just a few diseases transmitted by mosquitoes

    There are actually four different but related viruses that cause dengue fever, but the symptoms are similar. If you’re in the unlucky minority that gets sick, you can expect to see signs about four to seven days after the infectious bite…

     

Click here to read the entire article at Doom and Bloom.