Managing Pain in a Pinch

the american civil defense assn.

Pills in woman hands.

by Cynthia J. Koelker, MD

Excerpt from Armageddon Medicine, How to Be Your Own Doctor in 2012 and Beyond

The daily queue of suffering seems endless. Toothache, stomachache, headache, earache, back pain, leg pain, joint pain, neck pain, sore throat, sore feet, sore muscles, sore eyes. People come to you seeking relief – relief from their pain, and relief from fear. Are you up to the task of helping others, or ready to run away? Becoming a healer is not for the faint of heart.

If and when the medical community collapses, those left to carry on will need an armamentarium of tools to deal with pain. Even if it’s only your own problems and those of your family that you’ll be facing, learning how to relieve pain now, before you’re in the midst of crisis, will spare you needless worry. Pain is the #1 symptom that drives patients to physicians today…

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First Aid and Medical Kit Contents

The following information on first aid and medical kits is excerpted from the Survival & Austere Medicine manual. It reproduces in part the section on medical kits based on increasing comprehensiveness. Minor changes have been made in order and figure numbering. The manual goes into additional detail about each of the categories of kit contents, and what you want to look for in those products. This high-level overview leans more toward supplying the list of contents for each kit type in a more condensed format. The Survival & Austere Medicine manual is a free resource with much good information. Please consult it for more detail.

Personal bag/blow out kit: Carry this with you at all times. It contains basic first aid gear or in a tactical situation the equipment to deal with injuries from a gunshot wound or explosion (figure 1). This includes things to immediately render aid – it’s almost like a pre-first aid, first aid kit!

A list might include:

Combat dressings/Israeli dressings

A hemostatic gauze compound

Chest seals – Asherman chest seals stick poorly on wet, hairy chests despite being relatively common place. Hyfin or Halo seals or even a rat glue trap works better. Studies have shown no advantage to vented dressing chest dressings vs. not vented.

Long IV cannula or specific pneumothorax decompression needle

Tourniquets x2

Oral and/or nasal airways

Figure 1 Blowout bag: Personal medical equipment for a tactical situation (dressings, HemCon bandages, Chest seals, oral and nasal airways, IV cannula and a tourniquet

 

First response bag: Carry this in your car; take it with you when you go camping, family trips to the river, etc. It contains more advanced first aid gear and some medical items than a basic level medical kit.

Large kit bag: This is your home/retreat/bugging out medical kit. It contains your medical kit as opposed to simple first aid supplies.

Storage area: In your home/retreat. It contains duplicate and bulk supplies. Large plastic storage bins are ideal for this.

Continue reading “First Aid and Medical Kit Contents”

Survival and Austere Medicine, 3rd Edition Link

In 2017, the Remote, Austere, Wilderness & Third World Medicine discussion board moderators released their third Edition of the Survival and Austere Medicine ebook. The third edition grew to over 600 pages compared to the second edition’s 200+pages.

While the original content of the FAQ and the subsequent edition remains valid, we thought it was time it underwent an update again. We hope you will find it useful. It is offered in good faith but the content should be validated and confirmed from other sources before being relied on even in an emergency. It is a tool to help you with medical care in an austere or ‘grid-down’ environment.
When the original FAQ and previous edition were written, there were very few books aimed at the “Practicing Medicine after the End of the World as We Know It” market – however over the last couple of years several books of varying quality have been published, offering information on this topic.
We like to think we are the original “Medicine at the End of the World” guide and our uniqueness in the current market place comes from our history and that it is the collaborative work of a group of experienced medically orientated preppers and survivalists. Between us, we have extensive experience in pre-hospital, austere, remote and third world medicine – both with the military and NGO’s. We do this stuff – we understand the limits of the environment and the issues of supply and improvisation. We have trained lay people to do complex medical procedures and provide health care in their remote communities. We have undertaken community medical needs assessments and the delivery of health care after natural disasters. We have given anaesthetics and done surgery in tents in the back of beyond. While the [stuff] hasn’t hit the fan in Western Countries yet, you don’t have to look far to find accurate analogies to likely Collapse Medicine and between us we have experience working in these locations and situations. This makes our book unique.
The other unique fact about this book is that it remains free! It’s a labour of love for us and we have enjoyed the comradery of putting it together. We are passionate about helping to improve the neglected ‘Band-Aid’ bit of the “Beans, Bullets and Band-Aid’s” mantra
common in prepper and survivalist circles. We have spent countless hours on this book project, not to make money, but to genuinely improve
people’s levels of medical preparedness.

 

Short Contents:

Medicine at the end of the world

The Context of Austere Medical Practice

What do I need to know?

Organizational Issues

Medical Kits

Clinical Assessment

Emergency Care in an Austere Environment

The Clinical FAQ’s

Infectious Disease and Antibiotics

Sedation and Anesthesia in an Austere Environment

Major Surgical Procedures

Wounds

Family planning, pregnancy, and childbirth

Considerations in Children

Austere Dental Care

The Basic Laboratory

Sterilization and Disinfection

Medical Aspects of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Warfare

Medical Aspects of Shelter Living

Austere Mental Health Care

Nursing Care in an Austere Environment

Botanical and Herbal Medicine

Primitive Medicine

Survival Aspects of Veterinary Medicine

Austere Medicine Sound Bites and Lessons Learned

Survival Medicine fiction

Reference Books

PDF Link from the Austere Medicine site (22MB)

Local PDF Link if the above does not work (22MB)

Related:

DHS Austere Emergency Medical Support Field Guide (5MB)

The Ship’s Medicine Chest and Medical Aid at Sea (3MB)

Ethicon Wound Closure Manual (3MB)

Emergency War Surgery 4th Ed. (7MB)

Fundamentals of Combat Casualty Care (7MB)

Communicable Diseases Following Natural Disasters