Columbia Safety: Wilderness First Aid, Oct. 6, 2018

Columbia Safety will hold a one day Wilderness First Aid class on Saturday, Oct. 6. The fee is $125.

Click here for more information and registration.

An intensive 8- to 10-hour course for those who are involved in wilderness recreation. This course may also meet the needs of volunteers and professionals who lead groups on short trips in relatively low-risk situations.

Most first aid classes assume that an ambulance or other advanced medical attention will be minutes away.  While wilderness first aid still assumes that you will eventually have the same, it also trains for the additional time that you may need to stabilize a patient before that happens. This makes the class good for those preparing for disaster aid situations.

Beyond Antibiotics: 20 Medical Supplies to Store

Who doesn’t like talking about first aid? Everyone wants help for the hurts. The Prepper Journal has an article up, Beyond Antibiotics: 20 Medical Supplies To Store for TEOTWAWKI (h/t to John Mosby for the link). We’ve talked about first aid kits in the past. Check your supplies.

When it comes to medical supplies, some preppers store antibiotics, Band-Aids, Tylenol, maybe a bit of gauze and call it good. Perhaps a few more things, but not much because they’ve got a doctor in the group, or barring that, silver or barter goods and skills to be able to make arrangements with a doctor.

Unfortunately, that approach may not work out so well.

Realistically, how many supplies can a physician be expected to stockpile for a community? How many physicians are actually preppers who foresee a need? Post-disaster, it will be far easier to locate a physician who knows how to use supplies than it will be to locate the supplies themselves. While obtaining prescription medications in quantity is a challenge, fortunately many life-saving supplies and medications can be purchased right now, by anybody.

 

So let’s discuss some of these medications and medical supplies that we should acquire before TEOTWAWKI. It’s not an exhaustive list, but it is a good start…

Click here to read the entire article.

Wilderness First Aid, Kennewick, Sept. 8-9, 2018

Wilderness First Aid Course

Prepare for the unexpected with this fun, hands-on introduction to wilderness medicine, taught over two or two and a half days. If you like to take short trips relatively close to medical resources, work at wilderness camps, enjoy weekend family outdoor activities, or recreate outdoors, this course is for you. This course is great for people of all experience levels, and is best suited for those who recreate outdoors where EMS response can be expected in a timely manner (fewer than eight hours). You’ll learn the Patient Assessment System, how to provide effective first aid treatments for injuries and illnesses common in the outdoors, and how to make appropriate evacuation decisions. You’ll learn both in the classroom and in outdoor settings regardless of weather, so come prepared for wet, muddy, cold or hot environments!
  • Sponsor: REI Outdoor School
  • Location: Kennewick, WA
  • Dates: Sat, 08 Sep 2018 thru Sun, 09 Sep 2018

More info and registration links.

 

Medic Shack: Civil War and Disease

Chuck at The Medic Shack has an article up describing the increase in disease during modern civil wars and the lack of preparedness in the professional medical facilities.

Over the years we have talked about nuclear war chemical war, SHTF because of crazy politicians, money collapse, and general bad things. One thing that Cat the Herbal Prepper and touched in in past Medic Shack and Herbal Prepper Live shows is normal diseases that follow war, or SHTF collapse.

So lets look at 2 recent civil wars. Bosnia and Syria.
First off lets start with the worst mistake made in medicine at the beginning of the civil war.
There were HUGE signs of the impending war. The crash of Communism, the heated political rhetoric. The clashes between the 3 sides in small isolated conflicts.

So No preparations were made, no stockpiling of medications, no reorganization plan to help them quickly adapt to wartime conditions – if the need arised. As a result, the hospitals in Sarajevo ran out of basic surgical material (dressings, bandages, sutures, cleaning solutions, and similar) within the first three months of the siege. Essential medications, oxygen, and anesthetic gases were at a premium, and the power and water supply were cut off after several months. At the end of the first year medicine had returned to the mid 1800s level of technology. Another problem that I can see happening is the health care post SHTF going to “highest bidder” Meaning If you can pay you get treated. If not. So sorry Charlie. Don’t tell me it won’t happen. You all have seen the deterioration of medical ethics today. Doctors putting in pacemakers on people who don’t need them. Writing scripts on expensive drugs to treat a patient where a proven, less expensive drug, or no illness at all, to get some kick back from Big Pharma. I could go on but this is not what this news letter is about.
After the major medical centers closed and supplies were not to be found and good clean food and water was not available disease reared its wartime head. The official statement by WHO and the Red Cross was limited spread of infectious disease’s happened during the war. In reality, Typhus, Cholera Parasitic intestinal infections (Giardia Cryptosporidia) rose rapidly. Due to malnutrition there was a huge increase in deaths from flu measles and exposure. Scarlet Fever killed 2 out of 10 children under the age a of 6. Due to lack of clean water for hygiene fleas lice, mites and other insects infested the population. Outbreaks of Bubonic plague happened. Also instances of Bartonellosis (Trench Fever) Leishmaniases, Lyme disease Hepatitis A and C and others. Since it was declared a non outbreak event by the WHO there are few numbers to support the claims of eyewitnesses of the event.

Lets fast forward to the 21st century and Syria. Syria did not have the same level of medical infrastructure that central Europe had. Health care was situated in the larger cities and towns and the rural population made their ways to the cities or treated themselves.

The Syrian civil war on the other hand has had and does have extensive coverage by the WHO and other medical organizations. And the documentation of disease during the war is published and it is in a word scary.

The war started inn 2011. In Syria Hepatitis A was almost unheard of. By 2012 an average of 2200 cases a year appeared. Typhoid less than 50 in 2011. By 2012, 1150.

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. In 2011 less than 100. By 2012 52,900 cases. There is incomplete data after 2012 since the information is highly controlled and unverifiable.

One thing that is similar between both modern civil wars. No preparations were made by the local medical community. All the signs were there but no one in government or medical leaders choose to do something.

So what does all this have to do with the Prepared Medical Prepper?

EVERYTHING.

As we see from recent history the government nor the national and local health communities will do NOTHING to prepare for anything until its to late. Are we on the cusp of a civil war? It very possible giving the current state of relation we have with each other in our own country. The divisional racial wedge that has been driven between us. And the current fight we have about The Constitution of The Untied States.

So what do we need to look out for?

Click here to read the entire article at The Medic Shack.

Why Wound Cleaning is One of the Most Important Skills to Know

From DocRader over at Imminent Threat Solutions is an article about wound cleaning in the back country and its importance to wound healing.

Imagine you’re three days into a six-day hiking trip on the Yukon River. You’re taking some time out from hiking to explore the river and maybe try your hand at some fishing. As you approach the bank, you slip in some soft mud and fall to the ground. You throw your hand out and catch yourself on a large piece of flint, cutting your palm open to the fascia, before sliding into the organically rich mud.

Your buddy is a few dozen yards away and gets to you quickly. He immediately wipes away some of the gooey mud and you’re able to see some of the damage, including some of the white/silvery connective tissue. While you’re sitting there watching the blood well up, you begin to anticipate the inevitable pain. In addition, you’re immediately concerned about the contamination of the wound, given that you just noticed a pile of moose droppings right next to the rock that cut you.

However, you have an ITS Boo Boo Plus Kit, which you were smart enough to buy specifically for this trip. You pull it out of your pack and crack it open for the first time.

What Kind of Wound is it?

All external wounds share one common trait, they all damage your skin. Your skin is a very important organ, as it helps manage thermoregulation (as in helps manage your body temperature) and it provides a protective barrier to keep bad stuff out and good stuff in. When you injure it, you impede its function.

With respect to physical wounds, we can categorize them three main ways: low risk, high risk and functional or cosmetic risk.

Click here  to read the article at ITStactical.com.

Columbia Safety: Basic Wilderness First Aid, Feb. 10, 2018

Columbia Safety will be holding a Basic Wilderness First Aid class on Saturday, February 10th, from 9am – 5pm at their Kennewick facility.

Basic Wilderness First Aid: An intensive 8- to 10-hour course for those who are involved in wilderness recreation. This course may also meet the needs of volunteers and professionals who lead groups on short trips in relatively low-risk situations. $125

Wilderness First Aid classes address patient needs in those situations or environments where EMS is not available, or may be significantly delayed. Possible delay of emergency services becomes an important consideration when dealing with the initial scene/patient assessment. Illnesses and injuries that might only require a brief examination when help is on the way become much more important when you’re left to attend to the victim for a longer, possibly extended period of time.

First Aid and Medical Kit Contents

The following information on first aid and medical kits is excerpted from the Survival & Austere Medicine manual. It reproduces in part the section on medical kits based on increasing comprehensiveness. Minor changes have been made in order and figure numbering. The manual goes into additional detail about each of the categories of kit contents, and what you want to look for in those products. This high-level overview leans more toward supplying the list of contents for each kit type in a more condensed format. The Survival & Austere Medicine manual is a free resource with much good information. Please consult it for more detail.

Personal bag/blow out kit: Carry this with you at all times. It contains basic first aid gear or in a tactical situation the equipment to deal with injuries from a gunshot wound or explosion (figure 1). This includes things to immediately render aid – it’s almost like a pre-first aid, first aid kit!

A list might include:

Combat dressings/Israeli dressings

A hemostatic gauze compound

Chest seals – Asherman chest seals stick poorly on wet, hairy chests despite being relatively common place. Hyfin or Halo seals or even a rat glue trap works better. Studies have shown no advantage to vented dressing chest dressings vs. not vented.

Long IV cannula or specific pneumothorax decompression needle

Tourniquets x2

Oral and/or nasal airways

Figure 1 Blowout bag: Personal medical equipment for a tactical situation (dressings, HemCon bandages, Chest seals, oral and nasal airways, IV cannula and a tourniquet

 

First response bag: Carry this in your car; take it with you when you go camping, family trips to the river, etc. It contains more advanced first aid gear and some medical items than a basic level medical kit.

Large kit bag: This is your home/retreat/bugging out medical kit. It contains your medical kit as opposed to simple first aid supplies.

Storage area: In your home/retreat. It contains duplicate and bulk supplies. Large plastic storage bins are ideal for this.

Continue reading “First Aid and Medical Kit Contents”

Columbia Safety First Aid and CPR Classes

Columbia Safety, LLC, located off N. Kellogg St. in Kennewick offers American Heart Association classes for both healthcare providers and non-healthcare providers, including First Aid, CPR/AED, Wilderness First Aid and more.  They are offering the First Aid and CPR classes for non-healthcare providers on two different dates before the end of the year.

Monday, Nov. 20th

AHA HeartSaver CPR and AED class, 8am-10am

AHA HeartSaver First Aid class, 10am-12:30pm

Saturday, Dec. 16th

AHA HeartSaver CPR and AED class, 8am-10am

AHA HeartSaver First Aid class, 10am-12:30pm

The Red Cross recommends that at least one person in every household and place of business receive training in CPR and proper use of an AED. This training can give them the knowledge and confidence to respond during an emergency situation with skills that can help save a life.

Their calendar is also showing an eight hour Wilderness First Aid class on Saturday, February 10th, 2018, but it is not linked to a description, yet. It could be their Basic Wilderness First Aid class, which is an eight hour class or it could be part of a multi-part Wilderness First Aid class — which is usually 16-20 hours in length. Standard first aid classes assume that you may have an ambulance on scene within minutes, whereas wilderness first aid classes assume that you may have to stabilize your patient for hours or more because of remote wilderness locations.

Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class, Sat. Nov. 25th, 2017

Trigger Control Training will be holding an Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class for us on Saturday, November 25th, 2017 from 8am – 5pm in Richland at the M Hotel and Conference Center.  The cost of the class is $200 per person. Please click the registration link to see more details and waiver needs. These skills can be live saving in the event of automobile accidents, hunting accidents, mass casualty situations, violent criminal activity, and more. Twenty per cent of people who have died from traumatic injuries could have been saved with quick bleeding control. Please seriously consider adding these first aid skills to your repertoire.

“One of the most important lessons learned in the last 14 years of war is that using tourniquets and hemostatic dressings as soon as possible after injury is absolutely lifesaving,” Joint Committee to Develop a National Policy to Increase Survival from Active Shooter and Intentional Mass Casualty Events report.

Click here to register.

Description

Tactical self-aid and buddy-aid (first aid) training is for all non-medical operators and private citizens who seek additional first aid knowledge and skills to provide lifesaving measures for themselves, friends, family, or LEO partners. This class is designed to introduce the ability to provide the greatest amount of quality medical care when seconds count and immediate medical care is required.

We might not all be secret squirrels, law enforcement officers, or raiding enemy compounds; but accidents with life threatening injuries with dynamic medical intervention can mitigate the loss of life, limb, or quality of life. As a trained medical responder, you will be confident in your ability to save the life of another by providing care and preparing casualties for transportation to the hospital.

The course consists of 8 hours of both didactic and hands on training. Topics covered will be based upon Tactical Combat Casualty Care protocols with a pragmatic approach to situational and hands on learning. Students will demonstrate the ability to control and treat massive arterial bleeding, gunshot wounds, blast injuries, and other soft tissue injuries in a hostile or remote location. Students will be evaluated during 2 scenario based practical exercises.

After successful completion of the course, Students will receive a certificate of completion. The maximum class size for this course is 20 students. All expendable medical supplies for training will be provided, but the implementation of your own medical bags and equipment is encouraged. This class is designed to teach you how to implement materials and medical resources that you already have without attempting to market and sell expensive and impractical emergency medical equipment. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Class Schedule:

0800-0900 Hemorrhage Control and Combat Mindset
0910-1000 Penetrating Injuries and Hemostatic Agents
1010-1100 Hemorrhage Control Drills
1110-1200 Bleeding Control Scenario Exercise
1200-1300 Lunch Break
1300-1400 Airway and Breathing Management
1410-1500 Treating and preventing shock/ Environmental Considerations
1510-1600 Tactical Trauma Scenario

Saturday November 25, 2017
8:00am to 5:00pm

M Hotel and Confernce Center
Richland, WA