American Partisan: Ditch Medicine – Projectile Injuries

The medical staff at American Partisan has a short article out, Ditch Medicine: Projectile Injuries, talking about the relative futility of treating gunshot wounds in an austere environment. There are many people in the preparedness movement who are counting on their military tactical training to equip them for any offensive or defensive violence that they may encounter in an extreme disaster situation. They may not realize that modern military tactics rely on the long logistical tail not only for materiel but for medical response. Some tactics are taught, knowing that they will cause some casualties, but relying on rapid self-aid and quick evacuation to medical hospitals to keep loss of life low. And the US military medical establishing has made great strides in saving lives on the battlefield which previously would have resulted in death.  However, in an extreme disaster/SHTF/WROL/TEOTWAWKI situation, that rapid medical treatment will probably not be available to you. Tactics should be adjusted accordingly where possible.

Projectile injuries commonly present as gunshot wounds or fragmentation injuries. All missiles destroy tissue through tearing a hole called the permanent cavity. Injury also occurs by displacing, or stretching, tissue away from the projectile path much the way water moves away from a rock thrown in it; it’s a temporary cavitation effect. Can they be treated with the simple supplies available in an austere situation?

Sadly, the answer is mostly “no.”

Click here to continue reading at American Partisan.

American Partisan: Ditch Medicine – Medications

The medical staff at American Partisan have a good post up about medication, how long it stays effective on the shelf, and what you might want to have on hand in case of emergencies. Ditch Medicine: Medications.

Most oral medications are given a rather arbitrary expiration date which may vary depending on the manufacture date, sell date, or type of medicine and concern over poor storage environments at home. Some manufacturers of medications indicate their desire to have their medicines expire, because they want patients to have up to date information about the medicine on the newer packaging.

The Pentagon shelf-life extension program has shown that many medications are safe and completely effective many years after the expiration date listed on the product, especially if stored in a favorable environment.  This is also extensively supported with numerous articles found by looking up “Myth of Medication Expirations” on the internet.

Many drugs stored under favorable conditions retain over 90% of their potency for at least five years beyond the expiration date on the label, and sometimes much much longer. Ciprofloxacin, for instance, was found to be completely safe and effective when tested nearly 10 years after the expiration date. Some medications appear to be more stable and therefore retain a greater amount of potency after expiration; these seem to include Cipro, Flagyl, lidocaine, atropine and possibly the penicillins.

Some medications are more unstable and do have an expiration such as insulin, nitroglycerin, aspirin and water purification tablets. A disputed article in one publication suggests expired Tetracycline may have caused toxicity in one patient (personally I don’t believe it since I am sure millions of doses of expired tetracycline have been used in 3rd world countries with no other reported complications; also, that old formulation of tetracycline is no longer available anyway, so I would be willing to expired tetracycline if I needed the medication). I am not aware of any other expired antibiotics having this risk.

Preferred storage environments would be cool, dark, and dry. Blister packaged medications might be preferable because they are kept dry and are waterproof but have the disadvantage of being slightly more bulky. Tablets are typically more stable and therefore have longer storage life than do elixirs/liquids. Many medications may be ordered over the internet as pet medications. Quality controls for pet medications seem good and I would be willing to use them on myself in an emergency.

The below is a list of commonly encountered medications that you might want to know about, and I would recommend finding a drug dose reference book from a bookstore or the internet; sometimes you can find them very inexpensively from book sections at Christian/Salvation Army stores…

Click here to read the entire article at American Partisan.

American Partisan: Ditch Medicine – Laceration Management

From the medical staff at American Partisan is this primer on the care of lacerations in austere conditions, Ditch Medicine: Laceration Management.

Lacerations are trauma which result in cutting or tearing of skin and possibly underlying tissue. Please note that deep lacerations that are complicated by the involvement of injuries to major arteries, tendons, nerves or abdominal cavity contents are not usually treatable in primitive conditions.

Initial Care for Lacerations

Most bleeding is initially controlled with pressure. Wounds without deep involvement should be surgically repaired if possible to speed healing, reduce infection, and improve cosmetic and functional results. The approximation of the skin edges can be achieved with steri-strips, skin glue, staples, or sutures (stitches). Before any wound is repaired, a few simple rules should be understood.

  • The longer a wound is left open to the environment, the more bacteria it will collect and therefore has a greater chance of infection, especially if the wound is closed by trapping these bacteria within the wound.
  • Most wounds can be closed within 12 hours of the injury (since the bacteria count won’t be terribly high). Since the face and neck have increased blood flow compared to most other body parts this extra blood flow helps the wounds fight infection and promotes healing, therefore wounds to the face and neck may be closed up to 48 hours after the injury.
  • Wounds that are to be closed must be thoroughly cleaned of any debris using forceps (tweezers) and using generous washings with clean or sterile water or saline. One source suggested using fresh urine from person without urinary infection since that should be sterile (I think I would rather use boiled water).

Creating Saline Solution for Laceration Washes

Saline solution can be made by adding one tablespoon of salt to 1 gallon of water or adding 1 teaspoon of salt to 1 L of water. Another irrigation solution can be made by adding 5 mils of household bleach to 1 L of clean water. Washing the area with Betadine or hibiclens before closure should be performed. Ragged wound edges and the tips of angularly cut tissue should be removed so that the wound edges to be approximated are smooth and will be likely to heal.

Steri-Strips, skin glue, and sutures may be the most useful ways to close a wound in a primitive environment. Staples may be used but require removal with a specialized removal tool which may not be readily available. Steri-Strips (tape) and skin glue can be applied to many wounds to hold the skin edges together until healing occurs. These are less secure than sutures (especially in larger deeper wounds) but maybe faster, require less technical skill, and may offer an improved cosmetic result.

For larger deeper wounds, sutures may be best for closure. Some wounds may have skin loss such that closure of the skin edges may be under some tension. The strength of sutures would be better for that closure, over glue or Steri-Strips. Sometimes tissue loss may be extensive enough that complete skin edge approximation may not be successful. Some gap in the skin edges may be allowed in these circumstances. Tissue loss with tension on the closure would require that the sutures be left for a longer period of time until the skin has stretched and relaxed enough so that there is no significant tension at the wound before removal of the sutures. In wounds without tension on the face, the sutures may usually be removed in about 3 to 5 days (this rapid removal is because of the high blood flow which speeds healing). The sutures on wounds of the trunk without tension may be removed in about 10 days. Sutures in the hands and feet are usually removed in about 10 to 14 days…

Click here to read the entire article at American Partisan.

The Medic Shack: Pandemics

The Medic Shack has a short article up about preparing for pandemics, Pandemics. The Media, Food and YOU. It is not a comprehensive guide, as he admits in the article; rather, it is meant to assure the reader that the risk is real and how to get a start on thinking about preparation.

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a bit on Typhus in the US. 3 years ago it was barely on the radar. The talk of the town was Ebola. It is making a guest appearance in Congo. Oh guess what. There is a bit of a civil war going on there. What happens when war and deadly communicable disease meet? People leaving to escape the war. And bringing the little friends with them. Cat Ellis The Herbal Prepper and I talked about the dangers of modern air travel and the rapid spread of violent viruses. What we didn’t talk about then was our family car.

Right now Typhus is having a resurgence in California and in Texas. And its coming on the winter travel season. OMG DO WE NEED TO SEAL OUR STATE BORDERS TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF THE PURPLE CREEPING FUNGUS???????ARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGH!

OK. A little melodramatic. But a valid concern.

NO we are not going to start bouncing about in a panic like a fork dropped into a garbage disposal.

Fact is is if a pandemic is going to start there is not much in the 21st century way of life that will stop it. Until we get “Star Trek level Bio Scanners” that will screen and kill pathogens, we need to be smart about protecting ourselves and family

Last year was the deadliest flu season in decades. @ 80,000 deaths were attributed to the flu. CDC Brief on Flu Deaths 2017-2018 (Also NO I am not going to get into the pros and cons of flu shots) I’m just using it as an example of how bad a virus spread can be.

Viruses are not the only “bugs” that can kill us. For people who do not live in the desert southwest or mountain west have not heard much about Bubonic Plague. Except out of history books. My son Jake’s boss at the local blood bank in Anchorage thought he was joking when he talked about how plague kills people every year. Until he showed them the stats.

So how do we prevent the spread of disease or the start of a pandemic when things go bad if the technology of the 21st century can not do it?

Do we isolate ourselves behind walls and barriers? Or do we learn how to stop or at least slow down the spread of disease.

Quarantine.

It is one of, and in all reality the best way to stop the spread of disease. In todays world it is a “dirty word” We say that we need to quarantine Fido for a few days before bringing him to the summer retreat in Hawaii its all good. But when we say we need to quarantine a group of people from Outer LithuUnitedia because the Purple People Eating Fungus is running rampant there. People get up in arms and the cries of discrimination and racism fly though out social media and the 24/7 news outlets…

…This article is one of those that was and is tough to write. In reality it needs to be broken into a host of smaller articles detailing different facets. This one is written to provoke. No promote discussion. Please take the time to converse with me or with anyone about the different scenarios. My email is medic@themedicshack.net Facebook is The Medic Shack or Mewe at The Medic Shack

Pandemics are real. Not the product of imagination. Time is way past to learn how to protect ourselves from them. The first link of the chain, and one that is ALWAYS broken, is. Communication. There is no real, concise, and most of all believable source. But wait! What about the CDC? Yes they send out warnings. But are dependent on the national and local media. Ok so what about the local or national media? Good question. What is the general media talking about. When there is something on the news about illness it is sandwiched between politics, hate crimes and the Hollywood Who’s Who. Do a news site search for the current Ebola outbreak in the Congo. See what you find in the news.

As I said earlier. I have no intention of doing the fork in the garbage disposal routine of panic. I am just wanting to pass on information. The most powerful weapon we have is not our weapons. Its our mind. We need to employ it. And to employ it we need to arm it. Knowledge is ammunition. And used correctly it is the most powerful weapon and more importantly, the best tool for survival.

Cat Ellis The Herbal Prepper has written a book on pandemics. Its called Prepping for a Pandemic and its on Amazon. Get a copy and read it.

Click here to read the entire article at The Medic Shack.

Backdoor Survival: Become More Medically Self-Reliant

Backdoor Survival has an article up on using essential oils to become more self-reliant medically, including examples and instructions. Here’s an excerpt from Become More Medically Self-Reliant: Put Essential Oils to Work for You. It’s a bit lengthy, but it may give you a good start on using essential oils if you have been hesitant to try them.

When people first purchase essential oils they are excited to use them and to discover their benefits but sadly, a good percentage of those purchasers fail to move ahead and often don’t learn how to use them with much success. In fact, I know quite a few people who have good oils languishing in their cupboards for want of knowledge. This article gives suggestions and examples that may motivate a robust use of the essential oils you already have or have been thinking about trying.

Once understood and mastered and their efficacy established by successful application, there may be a desire to find other oils and other ways to include them in your home and emergency medical preparedness.  It is exciting to see a medical problem solved by an essential oil or a healing herb and thereby feeling a little more medically self- reliant, moving step by step. This knowledge is only acquired through using the oils correctly and experiencing what they can do to improve a medical concern. My small personal experiences build more confidence and put one more tool into my medical bag to help my family and others who may ask for help.

essential oils work for you

 

Three Successful Examples of Oil Use

Here are three examples of the many ways oils have worked. Please forgive me for sharing personal experiences. I do this with the hope that these stories will help others see that if essential oils worked for me, they may also work for you…making us all more medically prepared and better able to care for ourselves in our ailments and small accidents now and in harder times…

Click here to read the entire article at Backdoor Survival.

American Partisan: Ditch Medicine – Sterilization

Medical staff at American Partisan have an article up about the importance of and method to sterilize medical instruments in primitive settings, Ditch Medicine: Sterilization.

Sterilization is a term referring to any process that kills all forms of life on or in a material. Heat, chemicals, and irradiation are commonly used for sterilization. Any instruments to be sterilized will need to have surface debris removed to allow the sterilizing environment to reach the surface of the equipment. Expeditious sterilization or disinfection may be achieved in primitive settings using chlorine bleach, boiling water, pressurized steam, dry heat or open flame…

Sterilization may be one of the most critical parts of surviving some kind of disaster or other disruption event. It’s important to understand the methods available to you in a primitive situation, and prepare to have what you need on hand.

Doom and Bloom: How to Perform a Neuro Exam

Dr. Alton and Nurse Amy from Doom and Bloom have put out a video on how to conduct a neuro exam.

The medic for a survival group needs to be able to stop a wound from bleeding and splint an ankle sprain. For a long-term situation, however, a caregiver needs to know how to perform exams that would identify other medical issues. Here’s Joe Alton MD giving you a demonstration of a simple exam of the nervous system that would tip you off to a number of problems.

Nurse Amy acts as a volunteer for this video. While her exam is normal, future videos will discuss a number of neurological problems that the medic should be able to identify.

The Medic Shack: Typhus in the USA

The Medic Shack has an article up describing a recent increase in Typhus in the USA and how to combat it, titled Typhus in the 21st Century.

Wednesday about 1230 EDT Hurricane Michael hit Florida. The news, and rightly so has been showing the devastation that the storm left.

On the west coast a different storm. No wind no rain no destroyed buildings. Also no news coverage past the little blurbs here and there. Since July to October 10th, in LA Country there have been 57 Typhus cases. That is worrisome. Typhus we normally see in depressed areas of the country and world. LA is not a 3rd world country.

Armon Coleman, 63, looks over his belongings, left, at his homeless encampment along W. 94th Street in the Manchester Square neighborhood on Jan. 4, 2017 in Los Angeles. LAX has bought much of the property from homeowners over the past years and will eventually build a rental car facility at the site. In the meantime, the homeless are sleeping on sidewalks outside the fenced lots that are owned by LAX. (Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times/TNS).

Or is it?

As much as we would LIKE to think LA is 3rd world it is not. It has major issues but once you have seen a war torn or real 3rd world country you will immediately see my point.

Typhus is making a come back.

The CDC has been following the resurgence of it here in the US. During 2003–2013, a total of 1,762 cases were reported to the CDC. The break down of the cases is 27 in 2003 to 222 in 2013. An average of 102 cases were reported yearly during 2003–2007, which is less than half (209) of the average number reported during 2008–2013.

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/4/16-0958_article

There are dozens of reasons why. For right now lets forget the why. And focus on the Protect.

There are 3 main forms of Typhus:

endemic (murine) typhus, scrub typhus, and epidemic (louse-borne) typhus

The one currently infecting California is the endemic (murine) form. It is transmitted by fleas.

The how to protect is actually quite simple. Keep vermin out. Keep things clean. Keep your distance.

All the cases in LA county are in areas where homeless gather and live. Now before someone berates me for “picking” on the homeless. I am not. Just stating fact. Fact. Most city dwelling homeless do not have the resources to maintain sanitation. Where as the few homeless that abandon the cities have better sanitation. Fact. Vermin. Namely Rats and Mice live in close proximity to homeless camps. Why? Food. The homeless do not usually have access to the items to protect food. Homeless that live out side the cities have learned to use what is at hand to store and protect food. Fact. Homeless “dumpster dive” For both food and for items needed to survive. So do rats and mice.

During the middle ages, The Black Death decimated Europe. The cities of Europe were cities of the dead. The country side however suffered far less. But what about Texas? A friend on Facebook asked me that. She thought that Texas was sparely populated. Well the most cases this year are in Hildago Country Tx. The population is about 850,000. In my earlier statement It may be construed that I was attacking the homeless. In Texas, Typhus does NOT discriminate. As many from affluent neighborhoods as from poor get typhus. Once again How is that possible? Similar reasons as the homeless. Living in crowded conditions. Allowing vermin to “coexist” instead of eradicating them. (The “No kill traps are a prime example). Typhus does not care. Rich Poor Black White Yellow Green. It. Does. Not. Care.

The easiest defense of typhus is sanitation. Keep things clean. Keep vermin out. Dispose of waste quickly and properly.

Read the entire article by clicking here.

Related:

ZeroHedge: LA Competes For California’s Most Disgusting City As “Typhus Zone” Underscores Skid Row Squalor

American Partisan: Medical Care When the Lights Go Out

An American Partisan staff member who is a surgeon has written Who’s On Call: Medical Care When the Lights Go Out about the basics

…We tend to think of collapse scenarios as abrupt, but through history they have often occurred in slow motion. One could argue that our health care system is already in a state of partial, ongoing collapse, especially since 2009. Anyone currently working in that sector knows it, as from a boots-on-the-ground, practical standpoint the PPACA may have actually reduced effective access to care and utilization and has engendered a rather unique set of patient and provider survival skills for the prevailing medical landscape that share commonality with the grid down world. The most important of those are mental, emotional and psychological. Long wait times, restricted access to providers, high deductibles and out-of-pocket expenses, third-party bureaucracy, system consolidation (i.e Aetna + CVS) and increasing use of non-physician providers (not a denigration of them, so please no hate mail, I love my NP) are all potential barriers to care that have parallels in the austere environment. Developing skills for self-care and outright avoidance of the system are increasingly necessary, as things are inexorably getting worse, and it’s not just domestic. The Gray Lady just outlined slo-mo collapse of health care in China.

Primacy of basic, mundane grid-down issues such as water purification, sanitation and disinfection cannot be understated. They are the three most important areas to address; dismiss them at your peril. Grid-down medicine, like all things military and surgical, is mostly boring and even mind-numbing. It’s not all sexy trauma stuff. Most of that will leave you dead. While the products of human violence will most certainly be faced, failure to provide clean water, properly address latrinage, and keep wounds clean will kill many more than bullets and bombs. Monsoon rains after the Haiti earthquake led to a cholera outbreak (traced to Nepalese relief workers) that killed thousands. Dysentery is a big inflictor of suffering and death after disasters. Modern trauma care is very complex, needful of extensive resources and still can not prevent all death. In a grid-down world, my specialty will likely be reduced to Civil War-era skillsets: draining pus and amputation…

Click here to read the entire article at American Partisan.

Dr. Alton: Human Waste Disposal Off Grid

Dr. Alton at Doom and Bloom Survival Medicine has a post up on Human Waste Disposal Off the Grid, talking about the danger of infectious diseases when the grid and/or utilities are down. If you are in the Cascade Subduction Zone total destruction area, this is relevant for you. It’s also relevant to anyone else who may be subject to a grid-down scenario.

 

Most of our readers don’t live in an underdeveloped country, so they might assume that their infrastructure will stay intact even after a disaster; Also, they might continue to count on clean drinking water and safely prepared food. Likewise, they think there will always be ways to easily flush waste from our immediate surroundings so that it goes far, far away to a treatment facility.

When our infrastructure is damaged, however, we become easy prey for infectious disease. You only have to look back a few years to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the subsequent Cholera epidemic there to know this is true.

Earthquake Tent City in Haiti 2010

We’ve discussed problems related to food and water often in the past, so let’s talk about waste. If you can safely dispose of waste, you will have the best chance to stay healthy.

When electrical power is lost for a significant period due to a storm or other disaster, water utilities cannot operate the pumps that maintain water pressure in the pipes of your home. This pressure is one way that utilities ensure that your waste goes to a facility that can eliminate harmful bacteria. Without it, a “boil-water” order is often issued by the authorities.

Harsh lessons learned as a result of disasters have led to the outfitting of waste treatment facilities with generators. Generator power is helpful, but only while you have fuel.

Therefore, we must realize that human sewage will be a big problem not only in the aftermath of a storm but also in a long-term disaster. If the water isn’t running, a community without a ready supply of it will have a nightmare on their hands after as little as three days.

There are various examples of this in the recent past. In the grand majority, people were clueless as to how a flush toilet worked. After filling whatever porcelain options were available, they proceeded to pick rooms where they would relieve themselves and, as a result, their homes were uninhabitable in less than a week…

Read the entire article at Doom and Bloom.

Columbia Safety: Wilderness First Aid, Oct. 6, 2018

Columbia Safety will hold a one day Wilderness First Aid class on Saturday, Oct. 6. The fee is $125.

Click here for more information and registration.

An intensive 8- to 10-hour course for those who are involved in wilderness recreation. This course may also meet the needs of volunteers and professionals who lead groups on short trips in relatively low-risk situations.

Most first aid classes assume that an ambulance or other advanced medical attention will be minutes away.  While wilderness first aid still assumes that you will eventually have the same, it also trains for the additional time that you may need to stabilize a patient before that happens. This makes the class good for those preparing for disaster aid situations.

Beyond Antibiotics: 20 Medical Supplies to Store

Who doesn’t like talking about first aid? Everyone wants help for the hurts. The Prepper Journal has an article up, Beyond Antibiotics: 20 Medical Supplies To Store for TEOTWAWKI (h/t to John Mosby for the link). We’ve talked about first aid kits in the past. Check your supplies.

When it comes to medical supplies, some preppers store antibiotics, Band-Aids, Tylenol, maybe a bit of gauze and call it good. Perhaps a few more things, but not much because they’ve got a doctor in the group, or barring that, silver or barter goods and skills to be able to make arrangements with a doctor.

Unfortunately, that approach may not work out so well.

Realistically, how many supplies can a physician be expected to stockpile for a community? How many physicians are actually preppers who foresee a need? Post-disaster, it will be far easier to locate a physician who knows how to use supplies than it will be to locate the supplies themselves. While obtaining prescription medications in quantity is a challenge, fortunately many life-saving supplies and medications can be purchased right now, by anybody.

 

So let’s discuss some of these medications and medical supplies that we should acquire before TEOTWAWKI. It’s not an exhaustive list, but it is a good start…

Click here to read the entire article.

Wilderness First Aid, Kennewick, Sept. 8-9, 2018

Wilderness First Aid Course

Prepare for the unexpected with this fun, hands-on introduction to wilderness medicine, taught over two or two and a half days. If you like to take short trips relatively close to medical resources, work at wilderness camps, enjoy weekend family outdoor activities, or recreate outdoors, this course is for you. This course is great for people of all experience levels, and is best suited for those who recreate outdoors where EMS response can be expected in a timely manner (fewer than eight hours). You’ll learn the Patient Assessment System, how to provide effective first aid treatments for injuries and illnesses common in the outdoors, and how to make appropriate evacuation decisions. You’ll learn both in the classroom and in outdoor settings regardless of weather, so come prepared for wet, muddy, cold or hot environments!
  • Sponsor: REI Outdoor School
  • Location: Kennewick, WA
  • Dates: Sat, 08 Sep 2018 thru Sun, 09 Sep 2018

More info and registration links.

 

Medic Shack: Civil War and Disease

Chuck at The Medic Shack has an article up describing the increase in disease during modern civil wars and the lack of preparedness in the professional medical facilities.

Over the years we have talked about nuclear war chemical war, SHTF because of crazy politicians, money collapse, and general bad things. One thing that Cat the Herbal Prepper and touched in in past Medic Shack and Herbal Prepper Live shows is normal diseases that follow war, or SHTF collapse.

So lets look at 2 recent civil wars. Bosnia and Syria.
First off lets start with the worst mistake made in medicine at the beginning of the civil war.
There were HUGE signs of the impending war. The crash of Communism, the heated political rhetoric. The clashes between the 3 sides in small isolated conflicts.

So No preparations were made, no stockpiling of medications, no reorganization plan to help them quickly adapt to wartime conditions – if the need arised. As a result, the hospitals in Sarajevo ran out of basic surgical material (dressings, bandages, sutures, cleaning solutions, and similar) within the first three months of the siege. Essential medications, oxygen, and anesthetic gases were at a premium, and the power and water supply were cut off after several months. At the end of the first year medicine had returned to the mid 1800s level of technology. Another problem that I can see happening is the health care post SHTF going to “highest bidder” Meaning If you can pay you get treated. If not. So sorry Charlie. Don’t tell me it won’t happen. You all have seen the deterioration of medical ethics today. Doctors putting in pacemakers on people who don’t need them. Writing scripts on expensive drugs to treat a patient where a proven, less expensive drug, or no illness at all, to get some kick back from Big Pharma. I could go on but this is not what this news letter is about.
After the major medical centers closed and supplies were not to be found and good clean food and water was not available disease reared its wartime head. The official statement by WHO and the Red Cross was limited spread of infectious disease’s happened during the war. In reality, Typhus, Cholera Parasitic intestinal infections (Giardia Cryptosporidia) rose rapidly. Due to malnutrition there was a huge increase in deaths from flu measles and exposure. Scarlet Fever killed 2 out of 10 children under the age a of 6. Due to lack of clean water for hygiene fleas lice, mites and other insects infested the population. Outbreaks of Bubonic plague happened. Also instances of Bartonellosis (Trench Fever) Leishmaniases, Lyme disease Hepatitis A and C and others. Since it was declared a non outbreak event by the WHO there are few numbers to support the claims of eyewitnesses of the event.

Lets fast forward to the 21st century and Syria. Syria did not have the same level of medical infrastructure that central Europe had. Health care was situated in the larger cities and towns and the rural population made their ways to the cities or treated themselves.

The Syrian civil war on the other hand has had and does have extensive coverage by the WHO and other medical organizations. And the documentation of disease during the war is published and it is in a word scary.

The war started inn 2011. In Syria Hepatitis A was almost unheard of. By 2012 an average of 2200 cases a year appeared. Typhoid less than 50 in 2011. By 2012, 1150.

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. In 2011 less than 100. By 2012 52,900 cases. There is incomplete data after 2012 since the information is highly controlled and unverifiable.

One thing that is similar between both modern civil wars. No preparations were made by the local medical community. All the signs were there but no one in government or medical leaders choose to do something.

So what does all this have to do with the Prepared Medical Prepper?

EVERYTHING.

As we see from recent history the government nor the national and local health communities will do NOTHING to prepare for anything until its to late. Are we on the cusp of a civil war? It very possible giving the current state of relation we have with each other in our own country. The divisional racial wedge that has been driven between us. And the current fight we have about The Constitution of The Untied States.

So what do we need to look out for?

Click here to read the entire article at The Medic Shack.

Why Wound Cleaning is One of the Most Important Skills to Know

From DocRader over at Imminent Threat Solutions is an article about wound cleaning in the back country and its importance to wound healing.

Imagine you’re three days into a six-day hiking trip on the Yukon River. You’re taking some time out from hiking to explore the river and maybe try your hand at some fishing. As you approach the bank, you slip in some soft mud and fall to the ground. You throw your hand out and catch yourself on a large piece of flint, cutting your palm open to the fascia, before sliding into the organically rich mud.

Your buddy is a few dozen yards away and gets to you quickly. He immediately wipes away some of the gooey mud and you’re able to see some of the damage, including some of the white/silvery connective tissue. While you’re sitting there watching the blood well up, you begin to anticipate the inevitable pain. In addition, you’re immediately concerned about the contamination of the wound, given that you just noticed a pile of moose droppings right next to the rock that cut you.

However, you have an ITS Boo Boo Plus Kit, which you were smart enough to buy specifically for this trip. You pull it out of your pack and crack it open for the first time.

What Kind of Wound is it?

All external wounds share one common trait, they all damage your skin. Your skin is a very important organ, as it helps manage thermoregulation (as in helps manage your body temperature) and it provides a protective barrier to keep bad stuff out and good stuff in. When you injure it, you impede its function.

With respect to physical wounds, we can categorize them three main ways: low risk, high risk and functional or cosmetic risk.

Click here  to read the article at ITStactical.com.