Columbia Safety: Basic Wilderness First Aid, Feb. 10, 2018

Columbia Safety will be holding a Basic Wilderness First Aid class on Saturday, February 10th, from 9am – 5pm at their Kennewick facility.

Basic Wilderness First Aid: An intensive 8- to 10-hour course for those who are involved in wilderness recreation. This course may also meet the needs of volunteers and professionals who lead groups on short trips in relatively low-risk situations. $125

Wilderness First Aid classes address patient needs in those situations or environments where EMS is not available, or may be significantly delayed. Possible delay of emergency services becomes an important consideration when dealing with the initial scene/patient assessment. Illnesses and injuries that might only require a brief examination when help is on the way become much more important when you’re left to attend to the victim for a longer, possibly extended period of time.

First Aid and Medical Kit Contents

The following information on first aid and medical kits is excerpted from the Survival & Austere Medicine manual. It reproduces in part the section on medical kits based on increasing comprehensiveness. Minor changes have been made in order and figure numbering. The manual goes into additional detail about each of the categories of kit contents, and what you want to look for in those products. This high-level overview leans more toward supplying the list of contents for each kit type in a more condensed format. The Survival & Austere Medicine manual is a free resource with much good information. Please consult it for more detail.

Personal bag/blow out kit: Carry this with you at all times. It contains basic first aid gear or in a tactical situation the equipment to deal with injuries from a gunshot wound or explosion (figure 1). This includes things to immediately render aid – it’s almost like a pre-first aid, first aid kit!

A list might include:

Combat dressings/Israeli dressings

A hemostatic gauze compound

Chest seals – Asherman chest seals stick poorly on wet, hairy chests despite being relatively common place. Hyfin or Halo seals or even a rat glue trap works better. Studies have shown no advantage to vented dressing chest dressings vs. not vented.

Long IV cannula or specific pneumothorax decompression needle

Tourniquets x2

Oral and/or nasal airways

Figure 1 Blowout bag: Personal medical equipment for a tactical situation (dressings, HemCon bandages, Chest seals, oral and nasal airways, IV cannula and a tourniquet

 

First response bag: Carry this in your car; take it with you when you go camping, family trips to the river, etc. It contains more advanced first aid gear and some medical items than a basic level medical kit.

Large kit bag: This is your home/retreat/bugging out medical kit. It contains your medical kit as opposed to simple first aid supplies.

Storage area: In your home/retreat. It contains duplicate and bulk supplies. Large plastic storage bins are ideal for this.

First Aid Kit

A comprehensive basic first aid kit is the building block of any medical preparations. With relatively simple equipment and supplies you can stop bleeding, splint a fracture, and provide basic patient assessment. Figure 2 lists the suggested contents for a basic first aid kit.

Figure 2 Basic First Aid Kit

Basic Medical Kit

The basic medical kit is the next step you take from a basic first aid kit. The example here is designed for someone with a basic medical knowledge and a couple of good books (figure 3). A lot of common problems can be managed with it; minor trauma (cuts and minor fractures), simple infections, and medical problems. Between this and the larger more comprehensive advanced kit there is a wide spectrum depending on knowledge or experience. Most begin with a first aid kit and expand as knowledge and finances allow.

A smaller medical kit for your bug-out bag could be made up from the above by adding some medications (such as acetaminophen, Benadryl, and some Loperimide) and some instruments to a small first aid kit.

Figure 3 Basic Medical Kit

Advanced Medical Kit

This is designed for someone with extensive medical training and would allow one to cope with 90% of common medical problems including some surgery, spinal and regional anesthesia, and general anesthesia with ketamine, treating most common infections and medical problems, and moderate trauma (figure 4). This list may seem extreme, but is designed for a well-trained person in a worst-case scenario. Even though it is a long list, it all packs down. This sort of amount of equipment packs into two medium size nylon multi-compartment bags and a Plano rigid 747 box.

Figure 4 Advanced Medical Kit

 

 

Columbia Safety First Aid and CPR Classes

Columbia Safety, LLC, located off N. Kellogg St. in Kennewick offers American Heart Association classes for both healthcare providers and non-healthcare providers, including First Aid, CPR/AED, Wilderness First Aid and more.  They are offering the First Aid and CPR classes for non-healthcare providers on two different dates before the end of the year.

Monday, Nov. 20th

AHA HeartSaver CPR and AED class, 8am-10am

AHA HeartSaver First Aid class, 10am-12:30pm

Saturday, Dec. 16th

AHA HeartSaver CPR and AED class, 8am-10am

AHA HeartSaver First Aid class, 10am-12:30pm

The Red Cross recommends that at least one person in every household and place of business receive training in CPR and proper use of an AED. This training can give them the knowledge and confidence to respond during an emergency situation with skills that can help save a life.

Their calendar is also showing an eight hour Wilderness First Aid class on Saturday, February 10th, 2018, but it is not linked to a description, yet. It could be their Basic Wilderness First Aid class, which is an eight hour class or it could be part of a multi-part Wilderness First Aid class — which is usually 16-20 hours in length. Standard first aid classes assume that you may have an ambulance on scene within minutes, whereas wilderness first aid classes assume that you may have to stabilize your patient for hours or more because of remote wilderness locations.

Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class, Sat. Nov. 25th, 2017

Trigger Control Training will be holding an Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class for us on Saturday, November 25th, 2017 from 8am – 5pm in Richland at the M Hotel and Conference Center.  The cost of the class is $200 per person. Please click the registration link to see more details and waiver needs. These skills can be live saving in the event of automobile accidents, hunting accidents, mass casualty situations, violent criminal activity, and more. Twenty per cent of people who have died from traumatic injuries could have been saved with quick bleeding control. Please seriously consider adding these first aid skills to your repertoire.

“One of the most important lessons learned in the last 14 years of war is that using tourniquets and hemostatic dressings as soon as possible after injury is absolutely lifesaving,” Joint Committee to Develop a National Policy to Increase Survival from Active Shooter and Intentional Mass Casualty Events report.

Click here to register.

Description

Tactical self-aid and buddy-aid (first aid) training is for all non-medical operators and private citizens who seek additional first aid knowledge and skills to provide lifesaving measures for themselves, friends, family, or LEO partners. This class is designed to introduce the ability to provide the greatest amount of quality medical care when seconds count and immediate medical care is required.

We might not all be secret squirrels, law enforcement officers, or raiding enemy compounds; but accidents with life threatening injuries with dynamic medical intervention can mitigate the loss of life, limb, or quality of life. As a trained medical responder, you will be confident in your ability to save the life of another by providing care and preparing casualties for transportation to the hospital.

The course consists of 8 hours of both didactic and hands on training. Topics covered will be based upon Tactical Combat Casualty Care protocols with a pragmatic approach to situational and hands on learning. Students will demonstrate the ability to control and treat massive arterial bleeding, gunshot wounds, blast injuries, and other soft tissue injuries in a hostile or remote location. Students will be evaluated during 2 scenario based practical exercises.

After successful completion of the course, Students will receive a certificate of completion. The maximum class size for this course is 20 students. All expendable medical supplies for training will be provided, but the implementation of your own medical bags and equipment is encouraged. This class is designed to teach you how to implement materials and medical resources that you already have without attempting to market and sell expensive and impractical emergency medical equipment. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Class Schedule:

0800-0900 Hemorrhage Control and Combat Mindset
0910-1000 Penetrating Injuries and Hemostatic Agents
1010-1100 Hemorrhage Control Drills
1110-1200 Bleeding Control Scenario Exercise
1200-1300 Lunch Break
1300-1400 Airway and Breathing Management
1410-1500 Treating and preventing shock/ Environmental Considerations
1510-1600 Tactical Trauma Scenario

Saturday November 25, 2017
8:00am to 5:00pm

M Hotel and Confernce Center
Richland, WA