Black Man With a Gun: Dear White Man

Kenn Blanchard at Black Man With a Gun writes an open letter – Dear White Man.

Dear White Man,

I’m writing to you today because of all that’s going on in the nation. I thought you might need to hear a few words of encouragement from your friend and your brother from another mother. You and I have been pretty close since 2007, when I started my podcast in the basement of my house. You’ve invited me to your home. We’ve broken bread together. We’ve laughed, hugged, even. We’ve smoked cigars. We’ve shared in this Second Amendment fight. We’ve been to speeches. I’ve been a speaker at different events with you. You’ve heard my sermons in church. You’ve introduced me to your family, to your kids. We’ve come through a lot of stuff in these last twenty years or so. Some of us have been together even longer than that. We met, maybe, at the Second Amendment Foundation’s annual meeting, or the National Rifle Association’s meeting across the country, or occasionally you caught me at SHOT Show. We laughed and had some good times.

Well, my white brother, the time’s they are a’changin’. I see your frustration. I hear your anger. I read what you write in your posts. I see the memes you make. Or, I’ve noticed your absence online or in comments. Well, you know me. I haven’t changed. I never run from a fight. I’m talking more about love. Like the song that says nobody’s interested in learning it, but the teacher, it seems.

We got segregation, determination, demonstrations, integration, aggravation, humiliation, and no obligation to our nation. It’s a ball of confusion right now. That’s what the world is today. Yeah.
You got young folks walking around with their heads in the sky and cities aflame in the summertime. And though, the beat goes on. I think yesterday was the eve of destruction. We’re still looking for tax deductions and city inspectors, and Bill the collector, evolution, revolution, gun control, and the sound of soul. They’re still shooting rockets to the moon, but kids are still growing up too soon. It’s a Ball of Confusion, baby.

And I feel you. I understand where you’re coming from.

So, my white brother, I’m just here to tell you that I understand. I’m just giving you a shoutout that I don’t blame you for squat. I don’t. I know who you are. You’ve been the same with me since the beginning. Back when I was the lone brother out here. I was never totally alone, but I was pretty much the singleton. I remember how you treated me and my family, and then my friends, and then my club, and then as I grew my own advocacy and activism, and I grew, and you kept asking me, “How can I get more people of color into my group? How can I get more folks like you in my range?” And we just continued to push on. I know your heart. I know you’re not a racist. I know where you’re coming from, and I ain’t afraid to tell it, truth be told. I’ll still stand with you, even though right now some of you got your war face on. Yeah, you do. Let me tell you about anger.

There are three types of anger that the psychologists can recognize pretty easily. The first is the hasty and sudden anger, and it’s all connected to self-preservation. You think everybody’s after you, so you’re striking out at everybody else. I’m just here to tell you that it’s not me. Remember, we’ve been together a long time. I know who you are, really. The second type is the settled and deliberate anger — a reactionary thing. It’s the deliberate harm or unfair treatment of others. It’s an episodic type of anger. I know that’s not you. And, the third is a dispositional anger. It’s related more to a character trait. It means something’s wrong with you. You’re irritable, sullen. There’s some stuff wrong. Anger can potential mobilize psychological resources and boost the determination toward correction of wrong behaviors, like the promotion of social justice and the communication of negative sentiment and redress of grievances. It can also facilitate patience. In contrast, anger can be destructive when it does not find its appropriate outlet in expression.

Some of you guys are angry white men. And, you’re having a hard time navigating the situation. What happens? The angry person loses their objectivity, your empathy — which you had so much of before — your prudence or your thoughtfulness that you had, that you showed me. And sometimes you can get so pissed off you harm yourself. To all my angry white brothers out there, step back, and take a breath. One of the things I know about anger is that it can get you out of sorts. It can trigger some other stuff. It can make you rely more on stereotypes, and pay less attention to details and more attention to the superficial. That’s what I’m seeing in the memes. Anger is like any other negative emotion, like sadness or fear. Anger can mess up your analytical thinking. One of the things I liked about you before was you’re smart. Now, you’re sayin’ stupid stuff. If it’s not you, it’s the guy next to you. I know it’s tight, but it’s right. Why are you angry?

Because, hey, there’s fear in the air. There’s tension everywhere. Unemployment’s rising fast, and the band played on. Population’s out of hand, suicide, too many bills, hippies movin’ to the hills, people all over the world are shouting, “End the war!” And, the band played on.

Don’t you hear me talking to you? Do you know what one of the greatest motivators in the world is? Loss. Nobody likes to lose anything. So, what’s wrong with America right now? Folks have lost what they used to have — lack of leadership, the polarization of our nation, irresponsibility, the adoption of extremist philosophies, domestic terrorism, erosions of the right to be politically correct. Convenient truths, the rewriting of history for personal gain, the sense of entitlement, the fact that we kicked God out of almost everything we do. The end of “live and let live.” That whole tolerance thing, that politicians are just in it for the money, plain old complacency — what Martin Luther King called “indifference.” Nihilism. That’s a big word. Lack of good jobs. Fidelity….where did she go? Worship of the state, and a plain old loss of respect for other people?

I know you know this, I’m just here to remind you that I feel your pain, that I understand what you’re mad about. I’m just here to tell you that I know who you are. I still like you. Back in 1999, I created a website called Black Man with a Gun . I thought I’d be ostracized and kicked out by the whole world except for a few other radically black people like me. Yeah. I was woke before folks was born. But, you who was awoke before I was? You were. Some of you actually told me about the Deacons of Defense and Justice. Some of you told me about Ossian Sweet. Some of you told me about my own history. I had to go learn about it, and research it and find out about all my relatives, and how I was connected to it. My whole life, I’d been around it, but I missed it. You helped me realize that nobody knows everything, and all of us make mistakes. So, I took my militant butt to the wood shed, and learned some history. And, when I learned, I was on fire for this thing, and decided I was going to teach my world what I learned. I was going to share my knowledge with as many people as I could. And, you still supported me. You didn’t even see me. You didn’t see me get jumped in the church. You didn’t see me get beat down on the street corner. You didn’t hear about what happened after we testified in court in Baltimore or Annapolis — how the Mothers Against Guns ganged up on me, and how, through the grace of God, I was able to let them see the truth, the real truth. You supported me during evangelism for the right to keep and bear arms for almost twenty years. I was doing this crap before we had Google and Instagram and Facebook, but I’m actually kind of tired right now — tired of defending, tired of arguing the same old argument, but luckily, there’s quite a few younger people, younger brothers and sisters that are doing it! And I got nothing but praise for them, except for when they think they’ve created something that’s new and original. Then, they forget where they’ve come from.

So, my angry white brother, failure isn’t final. You know it’s interesting that failing and falling both begin with the same letter. Now, if you’ve gotten mad when you fell, you probably wouldn’t try to stand up anymore. But, if you looked at the fall and the sequence as just something that is — is it what it is — it becomes what you make of it. And, you looked at it as opportunity to learn, which, you did, as a baby, ok? Every baby does. And, what do we do? We get right back up, regardless of failing, and try it again, and you keep doing it until that one day, when you’re walking. Well, right now, we’re falling a lot. We got folks who thing they know stuff they don’t. We got people who are in charge who shouldn’t be, but the brain does not learn from success. The brain learns from the intense scrutiny after the failure to chunk whatever you’re trying to do into it with four or five different parts, and try to figure out the sequence that does work right. And, then it’s going to fire all those circles again. We learn very little from success. So, right now, we’re failing a lot. It looks like Hell warmed over, but be patient. We’ve been here before. The only bad part is people don’t remember the late 60’s, the early 70’s which would soon come — leaders and carpetbaggers, and all of that. We’ve gone through this before.

Folks were taking drugs back in the 60’s trying to take the pain out of living. Now, they just go ahead and kill themselves outright. We need to take more care of our neighbors. We need to take more care of ourselves. We need to watch what we put into our heads — junk in, junk out. We need to realize that all of this stuff is temporary. No storm lasts forever. And, it’s okay to be angry. You can be an angry, white man. Just don’t be angry at me. I didn’t cause none of this trouble! Some of it is good trouble. Some of it’s B.S. Right now that Serenity Prayer is pretty tight, but its right. Where it says,

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

That’s how we’re going to get out of this funk, white man! white woman! And for those who are not white who listen to your friend and brother from another mother, I just gave you somebody’s else side for you to think about before you judge them. We all live in a pluralistic society. I really didn’t even know what that was until recently, but I want you to look that up.

We all are born and we grow with different natures which, in return, leads us to have different likes and dislikes, inclinations and disinclinations, temptations and abilities to perform and act. I’m asking you today — white or black, brown, yellow, pink, or multi-colored, to try to understand somebody else. Avoid blaming people. You must understand that people don’t care about you. This isn’t because people are mean or hurtful, it’s just because they’re always focused on themselves. You don’t figure in as their priority. In their process, most of their thoughts are self-directed.

Everybody’s thinking, “My goals. My problems. My feelings.” Yeah. All of us are like that. Mostly, we are all self-centered, but you have to be morally accountable for your actions in this day-to-day life. Keep on understanding that people who appear to be mean or hurtful do not usually do it intentionally, unless they’re sociopathic. It should not deviate you from your appropriate conduct. To say everyone is completely selfish is a gross exaggeration that ignores all the kinds of acts of kindness, sacrifice and love that make this damn world work. Believe it or not, everyone is emotional, and that’s not an exaggeration. We look for reliability in the process of sharing where their strong feelings or points of view are paid due attention, but it’s important to find common ground when you try to interact with people. Understanding is everything. Communication is the secret sauce of the world. Believe it or not, people have short memories. You think they remember your birthday or event? Nah. Most people don’t recollect instances that don’t have anything to do with them. It’s just how we are. They do remember, most likely, similarities or approaches to things that are like theirs. Thats’ how I can say what I’m saying right now, because I’ve been around like fifty-eight years.

Almost forty of those years have been involved in this Second Amendment thing, in some way or another. Almost. Learn to have passion to listen to others. When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen, but when you’re a good listener, you can develop a better rapport with other people. Now, why am I telling you this? I know you’re grown. You’re old enough to do what the Hell you want, I know. But, who else is going to tell you that you might have a chance to listen? I know you know it — I’m just here to remind you. Develop that animal instinct. You know, it’s really interesting to learn from animals sometimes. They create new life with a purpose, and learn to survive. We have to keep on understanding at each level of a relationship to survive and procreate. You don’t have to read too much into the process of dealing with others to survive and procreate. Sometimes, we think too much. Just do the right thing. Spike Lee was right on that one. Understanding people who don’t look like you is a process of growing. It involves traveling down a path of your lives and making decisions. There will be mistakes, which everyone makes. The importance lies in learning from them to grow stronger. It also guides you to be true to you.

I’m not apologizing for anything except my own behavior. I wrote this letter because we have a problem. We’re more divided than ever, and some folks like it. You know, there’s power in segregation, hate, bigotry, and fear. Those who spread it, share it, joke about it, help it. Everybody who’s gone through something, it has changed them in a way they should never go back to the person they once were. Everybody.

So, walk a mile in someone else’s shoes, and see what they see, hear what they hear, feel what they feel. Then, maybe you’ll understand — me, too! — why I do what I do. You know my name, but not my story. You’ve heard what I’ve done, but not what I’ve been through. The most difficult thing in this life is to know yourself. We’re all going through something right now. It’s an opportunity to do better, to mend a fence, build a bridge, start over if you messed up. Having good morals is still a good thing. Having some core values is still a good thing. Having some wisdom is still a good thing. Thinking before you speak is still a good thing. Check your anger. Check your resources. Check how you’re rollin’. Are you acting like someone else? Or are you acting like you? We can all get this thing back on track if we first take care of our own selves. And, that’s it for this. I’m going to call it quits right there.

You know, at the end of every show, I always say, “just in case nobody has told you this today: I love you.” Well, if you’re wondering how I can love you, and I don’t even know you, check this: Some people hate me, and they don’t know me either. I choose to love.

Shalom baby,

Kenn

Black Man with a Gun: Why Is it Necessary for You to Get Firearms Training?

Photo courtesy realworld-tactical.com

Andrea Bell at Black Man with a Gun writes about Why Is it Necessary for You to Get Firearms Training?

Firearm ownership has been highly debated by international audiences. Policy-makers are always going back and forth about the legal position of firearms for public accessibility. With the increasing judicial limitations on the subject, it is evident that being responsible with weapons is critically important and cannot be taken for granted.

Because if you support the second amendment and would like to be the savior, you need to pick up an arm. Then the least you can do is sign up for training sessions and keep your skills well-honed.

Why do you need a firearm training?

The reason why people own firearms in the first place is to defend themselves and their loved ones in the worst-case scenario. Having a gun with no technical knowledge about its use is equivalent to leaving a nuclear bomb in the hands of an ape.

Imagine you are tied down on a chair and have someone across the room holding your loved ones on point-blank. You are tied down and are a picture of helplessness while the tormentor is agonizing your children.

You look around for some assistance and find a firearm lying right beside you. You strife to break away from the hold and try eventually to get rid of the rope tying you down. You have the arm in hand and are about to shoot the villain in the distance, but your firearm is jammed, and you do not know what else to do.

So you sweat more and think less, and an armed man comes to shoot you when you are awakened by a piercing scream of your toddler. You open your eyes and realize that it was a nightmare. Kiss your wife and child and search for the first firearm & bow range memberships to prevent this nightmare from becoming a reality.

Concerning the scenario written above, we would like to reiterate to our audience the reasons why firearm training is crucial for all gun-toting individuals.

Conduct Self-defense indoors and outdoors

Firearm training is not restricted to teaching you only about the shoot. In the long shot, it shows you to prevent losing focus in dangerous encounters. Training helps you develop an efficient strategy for the defense at home and in the outdoors.

These pieces of training inform you about the consequences of mishandling a potent device of violence. Most significantly, the training ingrains one thing in your mind, and that is the impact of shooting a person. Regardless of the circumstances, you were caught in, shooting a living being could shock your system into chaos and collapse and lead to life-altering consequences.

Discover the critical aspects of firearm handling

The basics of firearm safety and operations are often taught by friends and relatives who have prior training and experience. However, these brief sessions are never enough to learn all the critical aspects of firearm handling.

Hence we suggest our readers to invest their time and attention in taking classes from professional instructors so that they can stay updated about the subject and stay in prime shape. There is no denial in the fact that your marksman skills advance with every lesson learned and practically applied. So engage in this training to avoid any unfortunate events of  violence in your life…(continues)

Black Man with a Gun: 30 Year Gun Control Cycle

Kenn Blanchard of Black Man with a Gun has an article up saying that gun control seems to go on a thirty year cycle with some crazy, restrictive, nonsensical laws being passed for example in 1934, 1968, 1994, and now.

In 1991, I began a campaign to change the gun laws in America. It was accidental. Having grown up in the turbulent 60s, the groovy 70s and the excessive 80s, the thoughts on guns depended where you were geographically, and culturally. The Gun Control Act of 1968 had made firearms the scapegoat for the murder of the Kennedy’s, King, and El Shabazz. It was an easy sell. War is still hell. Criminals still kill people. Bad guys still exist.

Every thirty years since the first gun control act in the Virginia colonies preventing the Indigenous people, Chinese and African from owning firearms, the issue of gun control flares like sunspot. Politicians find the support to lie and instill fear of the inanimate object. Organizations grow based on that lie and people that don’t want to think believe.

Every thirty years, gun laws become more restrictive. Common sense is excused. The facts are ignored and popular opinion shifts away from reality.

What has happened in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the past few months is right on schedule.

The response is different though. In the past thirty years, we have connected via the internet. The news is still fed to us, but it can be chosen. Information can be shared without government approval. People are able to decide what they want to believe. The tactics to divide us are still the same and still work however.

Fearing a repeat of the deadly violence that engulfed Charlottesville more than two years ago, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a temporary emergency Wednesday banning all weapons, including guns, from Capitol Square ahead of a massive rally planned next week over gun rights.

The Governor of Virginia, mobilized law enforcement to imply that the decades old Lobby Day in Richmond was a threat to the Commonwealth. The passing of sanctuary cities in over 150 locales in the state added to the fervor. What is worse is that the same governor that may have donned black face in college, insinuates that the Virginia Citizens Defense League is like the white supremacist that plagued Charlottesville in 2017. Yes, he found some crazies to arrest prior to Lobby Day but the 3000+ people that successfully showed up, not only cleaned up after themselves but were law abiding.

He declared a state of an emergency and bans guns from Capitol Square. The media loved to show us the pictures of the armed brothers and sisters outside that area.

Gun control is and always has been racist.

The racism nobody will admit is against the white male gun owners of Virginia…

 

 

Click here to read the entire article at Black Man with a Gun.

Black Man with a Gun: That’s Crazy Talk

David Cole at Black Man with a Gun has a short article up on mental health and red flag laws titled That’s Crazy Talk.

I was recently listening to a talk given by my friend Cheryl Todd of Gun Freedom Radio on the topic of “red flag laws,” and she said something that caught my ear. She was explaining the difficulty that trained psychology and psychiatry professionals have in predicting violent behavior, and said “we suck at it.”

Minority Report is fiction, you know.

She’s absolutely right. It does not take much research to discover that it is in fact extremely difficult to predict violent behavior in even those clinically diagnosed…by professionals…as mentally ill. It is also a widely recognized fact that mental illness does not automatically mean someone is dangerous.

So why would we get in such a big hurry to take guns from people suspected of being dangerous, as assessed by the untrained non-professional…when the professionals admit that they “suck at it,” and that the vast majority of legitimately mentally ill people are not dangerous?

And why, if the mental health of the person is in question, do “red flag laws” confiscate the gun(s) but not the person? If the person is suspected of being dangerous, why should they not be immediately confined for assessment by mental health professionals? If their mental health were really that important to us, wouldn’t we want to see that they receive immediate care? And if the safety of those around them were truly the priority, how effective is it to just confiscate the guns we know about, while leaving the supposed dangerous person free to a gun we missed, obtain a replacement gun, or substitute another weapon to commit violence? After all, you could even leave the guns right where they are if you simply take the dangerous person away from them and into treatment.

Seems like there’s an awful lot of holes in that red flag.

You just know what she’s going to do if she gets out…

It is because it actually has nothing to do with mental health or violence prevention, and everything to do with removing as many guns as possible from the hands of free, law-abiding citizens. There are already plenty of laws on the books to prohibit criminals, addicts, and those who have been legally designated as mentally ill from possessing guns. But “red flag laws” are nothing more than an attempt to throw the largest possible net over as many gun owners as possible, without the due process guaranteed by the Constitution.

And that’s crazy talk.

Gun Control is Bearing False Witness Against Your Neighbor

From Kenn over at Black Man with a Gun. Full podcast below quoted text.

You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor. Exodus 20:16

It is exactly what prohibitionist, and anti-rights do when they push for gun control. The people, you and I that are affected by the changes in laws not the criminals, the insane, the evil or the terrorist.

To be a false witness against our neighbor basically means to falsely accuse someone else of wrongdoing. In the Torah, false witnesses were dealt with very harshly. We see in the above verses that if a person was found to be bearing false witness against another person, they would be given the punishment that the other person would have received if the witness was true! With such a righteous law, we can understand why ‘by the mouth of two or three witnesses’ every matter truly was established. If anyone rose up as a false witness, they would be given the same punishment they thought to give to their neighbor…. risking their own life! With such a thing facing them, they would be very careful, yes?