Basic Pistol and Trauma First Aid Classes Coming in NOV and DEC

Stealth Defense is teaching a few Basic Pistol classes in November and a Trauma First Aid class in December of 2019.

Ladies Basic Pistol Shooting

Tue Nov 5, 5:00 PM – Sat Nov 9, 12:00 PM (PST)
Stealth Defense Firearms Training, 2732 Katie Rd, Kennewick, WA

This course includes a FREE Initiative 1639 required firearms safety training lesson and certificate

Topics covered in this class include: gun safety rules, proper operation of semi-automatic and revolver pistols, ammunition knowledge and selection, selecting and storing a pistol specific to you (the user), safe and correct storage of firearms when not in use, the fundamentals of shooting, the three (3) secrets of accurate shooting, pistol inspection and maintenance, stoppage clearances, shooting positions, and a qualification marksmanship shooting test. A light snack is provided, but you will need to bring a lunch.

This course meets the pistol safety requirements for obtaining an Oregon Concealed Handgun License, and an Idaho Standard Concealed Weapons License. WA has reciprocity in ID, but having a non-resident ID license gives a person reciprocity in the same states as Utah at a lower cost. Students will be responsible for following the state’s requirements for obtaining their concealed carry licenses.

Course fee includes all student materials – NRA Book, Exam, NRA Associate Membership, downloadable exam prep materials, range fees, targets, and certification fees.

Co-Ed Basic Pistol Shooting

Thu Nov 7, 5:00 PM – Sat Nov 9, 5:00 PM (PST)
Fredricks Arms and Smiths, 1904 Airport Way, Richland, WA, USA

This course includes a FREE Initiative 1639 required firearms safety training lesson and certificate

Topics covered in this class include: gun safety rules, proper operation of semi-automatic and revolver pistols, ammunition knowledge and selection, selecting and storing a pistol specific to you (the user), safe and correct storage of firearms when not in use, the fundamentals of shooting, the three (3) secrets of accurate shooting, pistol inspection and maintenance, stoppage clearances, shooting positions, and a qualification marksmanship shooting test. A light snack is provided, but you will need to bring a lunch.

This course meets the pistol safety requirements for obtaining an Oregon Concealed Handgun License, and an Idaho Standard Concealed Weapons License. WA has reciprocity in ID, but having a non-resident ID license gives a person reciprocity in the same states as Utah at a lower cost. Students will be responsible for following the state’s requirements for obtaining their concealed carry licenses.

Course fee includes all student materials – NRA Book, Exam, NRA Associate Membership, downloadable exam prep materials, range fees, targets, and certification fees.

Trauma First Aid (part 1)

Tue Dec 10, 5:30 – 9:00 PM (PST)

Prosser, WA

  1. Performing a patient assessment.
  2. Traumatic emergencies.

Trauma First Aid (part 2)

Thu Dec 12, 5:30 – 8:30 PM (PST)

Prosser, WA

  1. Medical and environmental emergencies.
  2. Creating your own emergency first aid kit.

Brushbeater: Tasks for the Designated Commo Guy

If you’e the person who has been put in charge of communications for your group, NC Scout at Brushbeater blog has an article up outlining the basic tasks that you should be working on – Tasks for the ‘Designated Commo’ Guy.

…that’s where the challenge of the designated guy begins- competently training your people to that baseline.

First things first, you can never, ever expect to get anywhere if you fly so far over people’s heads they ignore you. Members of your group have to see the relevance in what they are doing or else its a doomed effort from the get-go. With communications, the tendency is for new people to get quickly overwhelmed and all of them are explicitly not looking for a hobby, they just want their equipment to work. If they didn’t have interest in communications before, chances are very high there’s an end goal in mind and its not experimentation. They want validation that whatever this was they spent hard-earned money on based on your recommendations actually does what its supposed to do. What you told them it would do. And if they don’t see the results, you’ve got an albatross around your neck. Everything begins with the basics. As we used to be told over and over again, there is no such thing as super-duper secret techniques, just mastery of the basics. And I’ve found that to be true of nearly every task in life- what might seem rudimentary to one guy might be a tough task to another; the goal is to build everyone up.

#1. Create a Local Network

The first big hurdle to cross is to establish communications among your people. Not in the tactical sense, but in the practical sense. Realistically, your neighbors and people who live within about a 30 minute drive are what you have access to as far as people go- should the balloon go up tomorrow, they’re the ones who matter…

Edit: NC Scout posted an update article based on questions that were sent in about the article above, Practical, Tactical: Training Questions from a Reader.

I got these questions from a reader based on the last couple of posts and its questions many have but don’t quite understand. There’s a lot of different reasons people begin to focus on communications, but when you boil it down, its one of two real necessities: either networking your group over an area, or, supporting tactical needs. The two goals are different, and while there’s some overlap, its a different mission set with different techniques.
I’ve began reassessing communications needs because like you said in an article recently, I as a ham have been ignoring the benefits of using non-ham comms somewhat.
This is a really common attitude. A lot of folks forget the advantages of license free options once they get a ham license. The thing about amateur radio is the great pool of resources and nearly unlimited options you’ve got on the table. But not everyone in your group is going to get up to speed or even look into a hobby- it’s easier to defer to you, the subject matter expert, and do whatever you help them set up or suggest. Which normally means going license free.
I feel like there is a line between too little radio comms and too much though. I’ve always thought of it as a team leader and up sort of equipment, I.E. not every rifleman needs a radio. Even then, you still probably only need one radio that’s capable of communication outside the general area of the squad, in order to send reports etc. But on the flip side, in a MAG type setting, people need to be able to communicate with each other as well. So if you were to use FRS radios for your local non-tactical nets, wouldn’t that exclude them from use in a tactical situation? And then also GMRS as well, since it’s basically the same chunk of spectrum as FRS? And I don’t like the idea of relying on MURS with only 5 channels for tactical comms, although it would be simple. So other than CB, which is also channel based, I think I’m out of non-ham options, please correct me if I’m wrong though.
And this is getting into the heart of the question. There’s definitely a line between too much and two little, and it all revolves around the mission…

UNL Extension Pilots Initiative on Youth Disaster Preparedness

From Tri-State Livestock News:

Nebraska Extension and Nebraska 4-H are piloting a national youth preparedness and educational outreach program designed to teach teens what to do in the event of disaster and emergency situations…

“Everyone can play a part in preparing for disasters and emergencies, especially teens,” said Ashley Mueller, disaster education coordinator for Nebraska Extension. “They bring unique perspectives and experiences when it comes to preparedness, and tapping into these can be very valuable to their families and communities.”

The initiative offers a flexible five to 10 week program. For the pilot, each state must graduate 125 teens by having them complete three components.

 In component A, teenagers complete the United States Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Teen Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training focusing on disaster preparedness, fire safety and utility control, disaster medical operations, light search and rescue, disaster psychology, and terrorism.

Component B features certification in CPR and AED usage, along with awareness programs focusing on HAM radio, NOAA weather radio, smoke alarm maintenance, and smart phone application and social media in emergency preparedness. The component also includes a disaster simulation, and a focus on public safety, fire service and emergency management careers.

The final element of the program, component C, includes a comprehensive family and community service project called “Prep + 6,” in which each participant helps develop emergency supply kits and emergency communication plans for their family and six additional families or households. This component allows for significant enhancement in individual, family and community preparedness and resilience.

TOWR Moves to Dark Web

From The Order of the White Rose:

Resistance Matters.

The Order of the White Rose seeks to train individual citizens in areas that will help them engage in resistance activities against an out of control government. Patterned after the original White Rose Resistance that stood up to Nazi Germany, TOWR is a new generation of partisan—training stronger, better communities who want to live free.

TOWR has moved its operations to the dark web. Our older content will remain here, but all new material will be exclusively available on an .onion site accessible using the TOR browser.  You can reach the new site here. (If you’re not reading this site in the TOR browser, then right-click and copy the URL into a TOR window.  Clicking the link in a normal browser will not work. If you don’t have the TOR browser, look at the links to the right and get it.)

Patriots do a lot of tactical training, and those skills are both critical and perishable. But what about the other critical skills? Intelligence drives the fight, and communications are essential. There are already classes for those trying to learn the basics, but what about those who have already learned the basics and are looking for more advanced training in specialty areas? That’s the gap TOWR seeks to fill.

We have not received any requests for information regarding our mailing lists, class attendees, or donors. We have not been contacted, either individually or as a group, by any local, state, or federal agencies regarding our activities, training, donors, supporters, or class attendees. Pay close attention to any modifications to the previous sentence, and verify any questions via GPG-encrypted email to team@whiterose.us. 

Our public GPG key can be found on a keyserver using this ID: 0A5903F4, or click here You may also send us a message on TorBox at towr@torbox3uiot6wchz.onion.

Brushbeater: A Few Notes on the Current ‘Happenings’

From NC Scout over at the Brushbeater blog comes his musings on current happenings, the non-event of the coincidentally timed annual MARS-ARES interoperability radio exercise, doom-sayers, North Korea, and instability in our own government. Here is an excerpt from A Few Notes on the Current ‘Happenings.’

Wild times we’re living in. And a lot of uncertainty coupled with real reasons to prepare. A big part of that is being well informed. There’s good stuff out there and a lot of well meaning people, and then again there’s a lot of throwback fear mongers and blatant disinformation that people should really know better than to pay attention to. Don’t believe most of what you read and only about half of what you see. Pretty good rule, right? One of the reasons I started this blog, all the way back to the beginning, was to point out some simple codified ways for Right-leaning folks to a) collect & verify information and b) share it sans-grid. In fact one of the first things I wrote was how to do so for Sparks31’s old blog [a re-run of that post can be found here] So naturally, as its gained attention over the past couple of years, things come across my desk that inspired the whole reason for me to begin writing in the first place…

Click here to read the entire post.

Related:

Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class

Full Spectrum Training

Forward Observer

Why Small Team Tactics

Is This What You Call Being Prepared?

Combat Studies Group: Full Spectrum Training

From K over at Combat Studies Group, Full Spectrum Training…Does It Matter?

So I know the question is out there….why is this website supposedly devoted to the study of warfare always talking about computer security and cryptocurrency? Shouldn’t I just be posting articles about “improving your shot group” or the latest in “tactical accoutrements”? It essentially boils down to this:

1. As anyone who has attended my courses knows, I believe in what I call “The Heinlein Doctrine” (or the Competent Man principal). In essence, a warrior (or just a human being for that matter) must be good at everything…not just shooting, or grappling, or navigating.

2. Right now, technology is at the forefront of not just battle, but our everyday lives….like it or not.

3. Many believe that war lies in the not too far future of the western world. I believe that this war has already begun. Perhaps not the shooting part, but the IPB (Intelligence Preparation of the Battlespace) has begun in earnest in the technical space. We ignore this aspect of the battlefield at our greatest peril.

4. And finally, there are hundreds of sources these days for sound tactical training, but very few sources for full spectrum training exist.

***

 “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”

— Robert Heinlein (From Time Enough For Love)

 

Continue reading over at CSG by clicking here

MVT: Tactical Preparedness vs. The Trump Slump

Max of Max Velocity Tactical writes this article about the importance of continuing your tactical preparations, even after a Trump victory.

It was reported to me that many businesses in the tactical and preparedness industry had bought in a ton of stock prior to the election, anticipating a Hillary win, and that they have been desperately trying to sell off that overstock due to the Trump win. It simply amazes me that people base a lot of their preparations on who occupies the White House, but it is a reality in ‘the business.’ A very odd way for people to make their knee-jerk ‘threat assessments.’ I took a different view, as a tactical training company – the election of Trump meant (to me) that I was not immediately expecting more anti-2A laws coming down the pike, which meant time to continue to build the business, and on a personal level, train and prepare. Because that is the key point – the election of Trump does not free us from the reality of ‘the collapse,’ it simply means that the current administration is not overtly hostile to gun owners and Liberty. A breathing space, nothing more. We still live in extremely uncertain times.

So what is it? Why did so many people appear to crawl back under the comforter following the Trump win? Those that had at least partially woken up to the need for tactical preparedness, in many cases, just went back to sleep. Amazing, and not rational. At MVT, we have a very active group of Alumni who return again and again for training; they have internalized the warrior ethos, and train to be prepared to defend their families. But we have noticed a distinct drying up of ‘new blood’ coming in to classes. It is definitely a phenomenon…

I know, I know: what we teach at MVT are true warrior skills, and not mere games at the range. I know that this fact in itself puts many people out of the demographic. But I am aware of that, and I know that most people are not warriors, they are not true protectors. They are fearful and weak. The people I am interested in are those with the courage to step up, identify the need, and make the commitment to get some real tactical training.

To read the full article, click here.

Skull-Stomping Sacred Cows: Sun Tzu on Dallas, Cowardice, and Training — MountainGuerrilla

flagJohn Mosby’s article is especially important for his conclusions as to what we should be doing as individuals.

“If we hope to see our own, common cultural values survive, we have to survive. That means not being afraid to move to the sound of the guns, and kill bad people. THAT, in turn, requires having the tactical and technical expertise to deal with unconventional, but professional level small-unit and individual tactical techniques, as well as—you knew it was coming—being physically fit enough to execute those skills ourselves, on demand, even when completely unexpected…
“You certainly can’t afford to get killed, because you sucked, and leave your family behind. If you’re a cop, and think your Academy training is adequate, you just saw a very graphic example of the fallacy of that (one of the slain officers was a three-tour veteran of the GWOT. One was a former 1st Ranger Battalion veteran from the 1980s. One was a former Marine. Are you better in a gunfight than those guys were?). If you’re an armed citizen, and haven’t had professional-level training with your weapon, and in tactical skills, you will be doing your community a greater service by moving AWAY from the sound of the guns than by moving towards the guns and getting killed or wounded…
“Go. Get training…”

I’ve held my tongue publicly, for a couple days, in the interest of not treading on the dead. As I’ve watched know-nothing news commentators, and politician police officials make statements that are demonstrably wrong on the nature of the attacks, however, I’ve decided to vent a little bit, in the interest of helping increase the […]

via Skull-Stomping Sacred Cows: Sun Tzu on Dallas, Cowardice, and Training — MountainGuerrilla