Mises: Why We Can’t Ignore the “Militia” Clause of the Second Amendment

Author, economist and political scientist Ryan McMaken has an article at Mises on the Second Amendment and the militia clause. The analysis is, for the most part, good, but not new to those who spent time studying the history of the Second Amendment and the militia. I disagree where he says that “privately-armed citizens can only offer relatively token resistance” to today’s standing armies, and I suspect a lot of enemy fighters would disagree as well, unless we can call eighteen years of war against lightly armed Afghani resistance fighters “token.”

Why We Can’t Ignore the “Militia” Clause of the Second Amendment

While many defenders of private gun ownership recognize that the Second Amendment was written to provide some sort of counterbalance against the coercive power of the state, this argument is often left far too vague to reflect an accurate view of this historical context surrounding the Amendment.

After all, it is frequently pointed out that private ownership of shotguns and semi-automatic rifles could offer only very limited resistance to the extremely well-equipped and well-armed United States military.

It is often, therefore, just assumed that the writers of the Second Amendment were naïve and incapable of seeing the vast asymmetries that would develop between military weaponry and the sort of weaponry the average person was likely to use.

Was the plan really to just have unorganized amateurs grab their rifles and repel the invasion of a well-trained military force?1

The answer is no, and we know this by looking at the wording and reasoning behind the Second Amendment. The text, of course, reads “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

Gun-rights advocates often fixate on the second half of the amendment, claiming that the phrase about a militia is just something that provides a reasoning for the second phrase. Many opponents of gun control even suggest that the only phrase here of key importance is “shall not be infringed.”

The Second Amendment as a Guard Against a Standing Army

Looking at the debates surrounding the Second Amendment and military power at the end of the eighteenth century, however, we find that the authors of the Second Amendment had a more sophisticated vision of gun ownership than is often assumed.

Fearful that a large federal military could be used to destroy the freedoms of the states themselves, Anti-Federalists and other Americans fearful of centralized power in the US government designed the Second Amendment accordingly. It was designed to guarantee that the states would be free to raise and train their own militias as a defense against federal power, and as a means of keeping a defensive military force available to Americans while remaining outside the direct control of the federal government.

This grew out of what was a well-established opposition to standing armies among Americans in the late eighteenth century. In his book Eagle and Sword: The Federalists and the Creation of the Military Establishment in America, 1783–1802, Richard Kohn writes:

No principle of government was more widely understood or more completely accepted by the generation of Americans that established the United States than the danger of a standing army in peacetime. Because a standing army represented the ultimate in uncontrolled and controllable power, any nation that maintained permanent forces surely risked the overthrow of legitimate government and the introduction of tyranny and despotism.

We can see this plainly in the speeches and writings of the Anti-Federalists like Patrick Henry, but we also see it in the more moderate attendees of the constitutional convention as well, such as George Mason, who “When once a standing army is established in any country, the people lose their liberty.”

Sentiments like Mason’s did not represent the views of oddball outliers. Rather, Kohn notes, these were mainstream views of the danger of an unimpeded federal military establishment.

But how to combat the power of a federal standing army?

On this, the Americans did not need to re-invent the wheel. After all, the idea of locally-controlled military forces answerable to civil officials was put into place in seventeenth-century England. The English militias had been created out of fear of a large standing army directly answerable to the king.

Although the system had fallen into disuse in England by the time the Americans were debating the matter in the eighteenth century, the Americans were well aware of this history.

These ideas were further developed at the Virginia ratifying convention where Patrick Henry mocked the idea that liberties could be preserved by simply “assembling the people.” Without locally controlled, military might, Henry noted, federal force could destroy the independence of the state governments. Similarly, George Mason concluded that the “militia … is our ultimate safety. We can have no security without it.”

As historian Leon Friedman concludes, “the people organized in the state militias were regarded as a counterforce against the threat that the regular army could be used as an instrument of oppression and service in the militia was a right of the citizen that could not be transgressed by the federal government.”2

In light of this, it’s easier to see the key element offered by the “militia” phrase of the Second Amendment.

Even after the adoption of the new constitution, opposition to a powerful federal military continued. Congress opposed not only attempts to increase the size of the professional US army much beyond 1,000 men, but also opposed attempts to mandate any specific training in a “federally organized militia system.” In the end, opposition to federal control of military affairs meant training of militias was “left entirely to the states.”3

The “Unorganized Militia” and Private Gun Ownership

As Brion McClanahan has shown, the Second Amendment — like the First Amendment — was never written to apply to the states themselves, but to Congress. The states were still free to regulate the ownership of weaponry in their own constitutions and by their own legislatures. Most state governments, however, elected to include provisions in their own constitutions protecting private gun ownership as an element of the state’s overall militia strategy…

Click here to continue reading at Mises.

Related:

American Partisan: Violence Versus Aggression

Most are familiar with the right to be armed, while wholly unfamiliar with the duty assigned to that right. The preservation of such right is predicated upon first being armed then proficiency at arms, followed by the assurance of violence should any other right be taken. Your duties accompanying the right of being armed is the capacity for all three of those qualifiers. And that violence must be both quick and decisive; violence has no other legitimate purpose aside from the preservation of one’s liberty.

Petition to Repeal I-1639 Launched

The initiative to repeal the effects of I-1639 is I-1094 (Defense of the Second Amendment Act of 2020). From Ammoland – Grassroots Revolt to Repeal WA Gun Control Initiative 1639 Launched

Thousands of yard signs opposing Initiative 1639 in Washington state last year did not prevent passage of the multi-faceted gun control measure. Now there is a grassroots repeal effort, despite a federal court challenge by SAF and NRA. (Dave Workman photo)

U.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)- Frustration and fury are the two main ingredients of what can best be described as a grassroots revolt in Washington State with the launch of a counter initiative effort to repeal gun control Initiative 1639, the extremist measure passed by about 60 percent of Evergreen State voters last November.

This isn’t a case of “sore losers” but legions of law-abiding private citizens who believe their right to bear arms under both the federal and state constitutions is being violated.

I-1639 has already resulted in one federal lawsuit by the Second Amendment Foundation and National Rifle Association, one declared candidacy for governor by a small town police chief, refusal by sheriff’s in a majority of the state’s 39 counties to enforce provisions of the measure, and the creation of a new crime, “Community Endangerment.” This carries either gross misdemeanor or Class C felony penalties, depending upon the violation.

The initiative also, for the first time in history, defined a firearm that, according to Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich, doesn’t really exist: the “semiautomatic assault rifle.” Under the language of I-1639, a “semiautomatic assault rifle” is “any rifle which utilizes a portion of the energy of a firing cartridge to extract the fired cartridge case and chamber the next round, and which requires a separate pull of the trigger to fire each cartridge.” This translates to literally any self-loading rifle ever manufactured anywhere on the planet, according to critics.

There is no indication Sheriff Knezovich, or any of the other lawmen who opposed I-1639, is involved in this repeal effort.

Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich said earlier this year that I-1639 defines a firearm that actually doesn’t exist. (Official Sheriff’s Department photo)

Perhaps most famously, the initiative prohibits the purchase of a so-called “semiautomatic assault rifle” to anyone in the 18-20-year-old age group; young adults who can still join the military, get married, enter into contracts and vote. They just can’t exercise their Second Amendment right to purchase or own one of these firearms.

It also created a registry requirement.

The initiative was opposed by nearly every major law enforcement organization in the state, a fact that was systematically downplayed, if not ignored, by the establishment media. It was opposed by some newspapers, endorsed by others.

And now I-1639 has spawned the effort to erase it. The office of anti-gun Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who has spent the last three years filing lawsuits against the Trump administration and who was an early endorser of I-1639, has given this new effort a number and ballot title.

The new measure is Initiative 1094, and the ballot title approved by Ferguson’s says this:

“This measure would remove requirements for sale or delivery of semiautomatic assault rifles, remove certain age limitations for pistols and semiautomatic assault rifles, repeal crimes regarding firearm storage, and change other firearms-related laws.”

The language applies to rimfire as well as centerfire rifles, so such popular sporting guns as the Ruger 10/22, Remington Nylon 66, Marlin Model 60 and Browning SA-22, the popular “gallery gun,” all chambered for the .22 Long Rifle rimfire.

The ballot measure summary provided by Ferguson’s office explains:

“This measure would remove increased background checks, firearm safety training requirements, and waiting periods for purchase or transfer of semiautomatic assault rifles; remove certain age limitations for pistols and semiautomatic assault rifles; repeal crimes related to firearm storage and firearm sales to unauthorized persons; modify requirements for private, non-dealer transfer of firearms; and repeal or amend other firearms-related laws, including requirements for recordkeeping, notification to law enforcement of firearms sales and denials, and background checks.”

The campaign, according to activist John Valle, is so far being conducted via social media. Initiative forms were being printed, and Valle said copies will be available for downloading online for printing on an 11×17-inch sheet.

Valle told Ammoland News, “We have a network of volunteers. Every Patriot group is on board and I’ve got 23 gun shop owners in Eastern Washington who will put it in their shop.”

He has spoken with gun show operators, and there is a growing legion of volunteer signature gatherers who plan to canvas the state.

Here’s the downside. The goal of this unorganized grassroots movement is to collect 5,000 valid signatures every day in order to turn in 300,000 signatures to the Secretary of State’s office.

The deadline for signature turn-in is Jan. 3, 2020 for the measure to appear on the November 2020 ballot, where it faces the likelihood of disappearing amid the presidential, congressional, gubernatorial and legislative election choices.

Among those involved in this effort is Nick Culp, son of Republic Police Chief Loren Culp. He’s the lawman who famously went before the Republic City Council following the passage of I-1639 to declare he would not enforce it and ask that Republic become a “Second Amendment sanctuary.” Sheriffs around the state followed suit, and more than a half-dozen county commissions also expressed opposition to enforcement.

The lawsuit, meanwhile, is lumbering forward. It is joined by gun shop owners in Spokane and Vancouver, and three private citizens in the affected age group. Currently, in the discovery phase, there may not be a hearing or trial until sometime next year.

Backers of the initiative are fired up, though they realize the challenge is formidable. I-1639 supporters spent about $5 million on their campaign. Valle, a Spokane-area resident, told Ammoland that he has no budget, and really can’t start a PAC.

But what this effort has is devoted participants. Getting enough signatures to validate is only half the problem they face. If the measure does quality, supporters face a daunting campaign in which they will almost certainly be out-spent by the Seattle-based gun prohibition lobby, which is bankrolled by billionaires and wealthy elitists, living primarily in a handful of zip codes in and around the Seattle area.

Sheriff Knezovich theorized earlier this year that the reason this measure included a definition of “semiautomatic assault rifle” is to lay the groundwork for a future effort, either via legislation or another initiative, to ban such guns. Anti-gunners think in the long term, he indicated at the time.

From KEPR TV:

Tri-Cities businesses with petitions and signature sheets:

  • Ace Pawn and Loan, 429 W Entiat Ave, Kennewick, WA 99336
  • B & B Express Printing, 7519 W Kennewick Ave, Kennewick, WA 99336
  • Columbia Gun Rack, 314 W Kennewick Ave, Kennewick, WA 99336
  • Ed & Moe’s Pawn Shop, 419 W Entiat Ave Suite C, Kennewick, WA 99336
  • Griggs Department Store: 801 W Columbia St, Pasco, WA 99301
  • Hole in the Wall, 7509 W Deschutes Ave, Kennewick, WA 99336
  • Talos Tactical, 4096 W Van Giesen St, West Richland, WA 99353

 

KIRO Radio: Gun rights activists mounting legal opposition to I-1639, AG Ferguson

The following Yakima Valley businesses are also reportedly carrying the petition and signature sheets:

  • Ranch and Home, Kennewick and Pasco locations
  • J&L Produce, Richland
  • The Coffee Bean, 840 Stevens Dr., Richland
  • Brubaker Arms, Yakima
  • Old Mill Country Store, 1504 S 36th Ave, Yakima
  • The Range, 1701 Garretson Ln, Yakima
  • UPS Store 6788, 420 S 72nd Ave, Ste. 180, Yakima

Basic Pistol and Trauma First Aid Classes Coming in NOV and DEC

Stealth Defense is teaching a few Basic Pistol classes in November and a Trauma First Aid class in December of 2019.

Ladies Basic Pistol Shooting

Tue Nov 5, 5:00 PM – Sat Nov 9, 12:00 PM (PST)
Stealth Defense Firearms Training, 2732 Katie Rd, Kennewick, WA

This course includes a FREE Initiative 1639 required firearms safety training lesson and certificate

Topics covered in this class include: gun safety rules, proper operation of semi-automatic and revolver pistols, ammunition knowledge and selection, selecting and storing a pistol specific to you (the user), safe and correct storage of firearms when not in use, the fundamentals of shooting, the three (3) secrets of accurate shooting, pistol inspection and maintenance, stoppage clearances, shooting positions, and a qualification marksmanship shooting test. A light snack is provided, but you will need to bring a lunch.

This course meets the pistol safety requirements for obtaining an Oregon Concealed Handgun License, and an Idaho Standard Concealed Weapons License. WA has reciprocity in ID, but having a non-resident ID license gives a person reciprocity in the same states as Utah at a lower cost. Students will be responsible for following the state’s requirements for obtaining their concealed carry licenses.

Course fee includes all student materials – NRA Book, Exam, NRA Associate Membership, downloadable exam prep materials, range fees, targets, and certification fees.

Co-Ed Basic Pistol Shooting

Thu Nov 7, 5:00 PM – Sat Nov 9, 5:00 PM (PST)
Fredricks Arms and Smiths, 1904 Airport Way, Richland, WA, USA

This course includes a FREE Initiative 1639 required firearms safety training lesson and certificate

Topics covered in this class include: gun safety rules, proper operation of semi-automatic and revolver pistols, ammunition knowledge and selection, selecting and storing a pistol specific to you (the user), safe and correct storage of firearms when not in use, the fundamentals of shooting, the three (3) secrets of accurate shooting, pistol inspection and maintenance, stoppage clearances, shooting positions, and a qualification marksmanship shooting test. A light snack is provided, but you will need to bring a lunch.

This course meets the pistol safety requirements for obtaining an Oregon Concealed Handgun License, and an Idaho Standard Concealed Weapons License. WA has reciprocity in ID, but having a non-resident ID license gives a person reciprocity in the same states as Utah at a lower cost. Students will be responsible for following the state’s requirements for obtaining their concealed carry licenses.

Course fee includes all student materials – NRA Book, Exam, NRA Associate Membership, downloadable exam prep materials, range fees, targets, and certification fees.

Trauma First Aid (part 1)

Tue Dec 10, 5:30 – 9:00 PM (PST)

Prosser, WA

  1. Performing a patient assessment.
  2. Traumatic emergencies.

Trauma First Aid (part 2)

Thu Dec 12, 5:30 – 8:30 PM (PST)

Prosser, WA

  1. Medical and environmental emergencies.
  2. Creating your own emergency first aid kit.

Firearms Practice: When Is Good Enough Enough?

This article is written by Ronald Andring, Sr. over at the Brubaker Arms blog. Mr. Andring has some good words on firearms practice – how often to practice, what to practice, why practice.

When Is Good Enough Enough?

Ronald Andring, Sr. is a veteran of a 30+ year career in law enforcement and corrections, serving with the Washington State Patrol, the Walla Walla Police Department, and the Washington Department of Corrections until his retirement in 2005.

Looking back to my first pistol purchase I also bought a box of ammunition and some targets, went to the range, shot some holes, and believed I could adequately defend myself in any situation. Such is the ignorance of youth. That was 45 years ago. Since then I have become both older and wiser. Not only have I become aware my practice strategy must evolve, but also the skills I developed must be constantly renewed as they can fade over time. I am now constantly asking myself when is good enough enough?

Regardless of our present skill level, those skills will degrade to some degree over time. The adage “use it or lose it” applies to all of the skills we develop in life, most importantly, self-defense skills. In an actual self-defense situation those skills will be degraded further because of the body’s natural stress response. We all respond similarly, to some degree, in stressful situations. Our heart rate and respiration quicken as our visual focus narrows. While this response helps us focus on a potential threat, it also leads our brains to fall back on our training for a response.

Regular training of defensive skills is important to successfully surviving a potentially deadly encounter. While a shooting range is required to actually practice firing your weapon, many related skills can be regularly practiced without firing a shot. These skills can be practiced using an inert firearm, or with an actual firearm, as long as it is unloaded. Before doing any practice with a firearm outside of a range be certain the magazine or cylinder is empty and there is no round in the chamber.

Practice Your Draw Stroke

The draw stroke is a skill which can be practiced anywhere. All it requires is a holster and your firearm. When practicing the draw stroke you should focus on each step, beginning slowly and working up your speed as your proficiency improves. The last thing you want is a premature discharge while drawing your weapon. The draw stroke is not a single action, but a series of steps that must be completed in order to successfully bring your weapon on target ready to shoot if necessary. There are four elements to the draw stroke, and each contributes to a successful presentation of your weapon to a target, and returning it safely to the holster.

The first step is getting your firearm ready to draw. Whether your firearm is concealed or opened carried this step is the same. It will also be similar whether your firearm is carried in the appendix, hip, back, shoulder or ankle position — use your support hand to sweep any cover garment up and away from your firearm. The last thing you want is to catch a sight, hammer or other portion of your firearm on your clothing. This could result in a delay, or worse, pulling your firearm from your hand.

At the same time you want to get a full firing grip on your firearm. A full firing grip means you are grasping your firearm in the same manner you do when you eventually shoot. If you do not have a full grip this will mean losing precious time resetting your grip later in the process, or possibly dropping your firearm. Without a full firing grip, at the end of the draw stroke your accuracy will likely suffer a decrease in accuracy. At this point you want to be sure your finger is off of the trigger to prevent a premature discharge.

In the second step your shooting hand should move sufficiently to bring the muzzle well out of the holster and bring your weapon to your chest with the muzzle facing forward. From this position you can fire quickly if necessary, which may be necessary if an attacker is on top of you already. If your firearm is equipped with a safety you should also practice releasing the safety in this step.

The third step of the draw stroke is to bring your support hand to your shooting hand and establish your strong two handed grip. Your shooting hand will be pushing forward into the palm of your support hand while your support hand is pulling back into your shooting hand. You should still be keeping your finger off of the trigger at this point, unless you need to shoot.

The fourth step is extending your arms into your firing position, focusing on your front sight, and if necessary to shoot, putting your finger on the trigger. At this point you will be acquiring your target, and making your decision about shooting. This same step can be used to bring your firearm to a low ready position, with your finger off of the trigger, if shooting immediately is not warranted.

Whether firing or not, re-holstering your firearm is equally important practice. Before re-holstering your firearm, be certain your finger is off of the trigger. Many an accidental discharge has occurred because the shooter had his/he finger on the trigger while re-holstering. To re-holster bring your arms back toward your body, separate your hands, bring the muzzle to the opening of the holster and push your firearm firmly into place…

Continue reading at Brubaker Arms.

Related:

Primary & Seconday: Baselines 1, Baselines 2

AmPart: So What’s the Matter with Universal Gun Registration?

Author and former navy seal Matt Bracken has written a short post at American Partisan on some twentieth century firearm registration history – So What’s the Matter with Universal Gun Registration?

To say that Turkey did not enjoy a smooth transition from being the seat of the collapsing Ottoman Empire, through World War One and into the modernist Ataturk era, would be a massive understatement. In those turbulent times, ethnic Turks, Muslims composing the vast majority of the population, considered their Christian minorities, especially the Armenians, to be disloyal and treacherous.

In 1911, a national gun registration law was passed in Turkey, with no apparent ill intention beyond increasing public safety. In 1915, during The Great War, these gun registration lists were used to disarm the Armenian and other Christian populations. Army battalions cordoned off entire towns and did gun sweeps. Once disarmed, the official state violence visited against the Armenians ratcheted up to murderous levels. Typically, on town-wide sweeps, all of the men and boys were taken away by the Turkish soldiers, never to be seen or heard from again…

…A new low standard had been set. A nation’s leaders could commit genocide against a despised minority, murder two million living souls in full view, and the world would not give a good damn. It was an important lesson for future dictators, leading to even greater mass murders under the Nazis and Soviets.

And the German Nazis and the Soviet Communists learned another crucial lesson from the Turks: national gun registration laws could be passed easily in the name of dubious “public safety,” and the registration lists could be used later to disarm selected minorities and then subsequently to arrest, deport, and murder them by the millions after they were helpless to resist…

Click here to read the entire article at American Partisan.

Black Man with a Gun: That’s Crazy Talk

David Cole at Black Man with a Gun has a short article up on mental health and red flag laws titled That’s Crazy Talk.

I was recently listening to a talk given by my friend Cheryl Todd of Gun Freedom Radio on the topic of “red flag laws,” and she said something that caught my ear. She was explaining the difficulty that trained psychology and psychiatry professionals have in predicting violent behavior, and said “we suck at it.”

Minority Report is fiction, you know.

She’s absolutely right. It does not take much research to discover that it is in fact extremely difficult to predict violent behavior in even those clinically diagnosed…by professionals…as mentally ill. It is also a widely recognized fact that mental illness does not automatically mean someone is dangerous.

So why would we get in such a big hurry to take guns from people suspected of being dangerous, as assessed by the untrained non-professional…when the professionals admit that they “suck at it,” and that the vast majority of legitimately mentally ill people are not dangerous?

And why, if the mental health of the person is in question, do “red flag laws” confiscate the gun(s) but not the person? If the person is suspected of being dangerous, why should they not be immediately confined for assessment by mental health professionals? If their mental health were really that important to us, wouldn’t we want to see that they receive immediate care? And if the safety of those around them were truly the priority, how effective is it to just confiscate the guns we know about, while leaving the supposed dangerous person free to a gun we missed, obtain a replacement gun, or substitute another weapon to commit violence? After all, you could even leave the guns right where they are if you simply take the dangerous person away from them and into treatment.

Seems like there’s an awful lot of holes in that red flag.

You just know what she’s going to do if she gets out…

It is because it actually has nothing to do with mental health or violence prevention, and everything to do with removing as many guns as possible from the hands of free, law-abiding citizens. There are already plenty of laws on the books to prohibit criminals, addicts, and those who have been legally designated as mentally ill from possessing guns. But “red flag laws” are nothing more than an attempt to throw the largest possible net over as many gun owners as possible, without the due process guaranteed by the Constitution.

And that’s crazy talk.

Colion Noir: Would We Be More Safe Without the Second Amendment?

In this video are some common sense statements by Colion Noir. Because many acts of self-defense go unreported, there are no government statistics on self-defense uses of firearms. That said researchers have found that firearms are used in self-defense anywhere between 300,000 and 2,000,000 times a year in the USA. The next time someone mentions “the health cost of gun crime victims” as a reason you shouldn’t be allowed to own a firearm, you can ask them how much more the cost would be of adding a million crime victims.

Washington Strikes Back Event, Feb. 19, 2019 -Yakima

From the Washington Strikes Back Facebook page:

Do you believe in the constitutional right to keep and bear arms? Do you stand with Yakima County Sheriff Bob Udell’s position that I-1639 is unconstitutional? Do you believe that WA Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s endorsement and support of I-1639 was wrong, a violation of his oath, a violation of the US and WA Constitution(s), and that he overstepped the authority of his office?

If you wish to take action, join fellow patriotic Washington citizens, Tuesday, Feb. 19, at 6:30 pm, for our concerned citizens’ event. (Yakima Convention Center)

MAKE a stand and hear how you can make a difference.

LEARN how you can stand with our constitutions.

HOLD AG Ferguson accountable.

Free admission. Coffee and water provided.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019 at 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM PST

Yakima Convention Center

10 N 8th St, Yakima, Washington 98901

Personal Defense World: How and When to Start Teaching Kids to Shoot

Personal Defense World has an article up 5 Experts on How and When You Should Start Teaching Kids to Shoot

To train or not to train? That is the loaded question. In a world with extreme conservative versus liberal views and a media that spins numbers with misleading statistics, you will find some varying passionate answers to this question. When should you start teaching kids to shoot?

If you’re looking up statistics, I would urge you to proceed with caution. There is a lot of “spin.” While the numbers may be correct, the way they are presented is typically deceptive to serve propaganda purposes. For example, you will see certain numbers for “children killed by guns” per year. The information you are not getting is that, in these stats, a child is considered anyone under the age of 21. So while your mind is picturing a young child who has accidentally shot his or herself or someone else, the reality is that the majority are older teens and young adults who have intentionally committed a crime. Guns do not kill people. People with ill intent wielding guns do. I believe there is a greater need for fixing our moral compass rather than expand gun control.

There are cases, however, where a child has found a firearm and horrible accidents have occurred. This can be totally thwarted with proper education and training. If you have firearms in your home as well as children, you have a responsibility to educate and train them on gun safety. Taking it a step further, training them to shoot under your guidance is even more beneficial.

To get a better understanding in this area, I asked five firearms experts to weigh in on how and when to begin training young shooters.

Fred Mastison — President of Force Options Tactical Training Solutions

I am a firm believer in teaching kids to shoot. There are many reasons for this, but two main points are safety and self-confidence. If you have firearms in the home, it is important that kids understand them in totality. Not only that they are potentially dangerous, but if they are treated with respect, they can be enjoyable. Kids that learn to shoot safely and correctly gain a level of self-confidence that is tough to find elsewhere…

Click here to read the entire article at PDW.

Mises: Brief History of Repressive Regimes and Their Gun Laws

From the Mises Institute comes the article A Brief History of Repressive Regimes and Their Gun Laws

Arguably one of the rights that has seen less government encroachment in the US — in contrast to other activities such as commerce — gun rights are now witnessing unprecedented attacks at the state level and even from politically-connected corporate entities.

Although gun control laws are not created equally in terms of overall impact, gun confiscation holds a special place in the halls of political repression. A trip down memory lane will give us a refresher of how gun confiscation has helped consolidate government power.

The Soviet Union and Its Satellite States

The Soviet Union left its mark as one of the deadliest political regimes in the history of mankind. However, it could not get away with such atrocities without having a complete monopoly on the use of force…

Although the numbers are highly disputed, Robert Conquest contends in his book The Great Terror that at least 15 million people perished under Soviet rule.

Nazi Germany

These days the word Nazi is tossed around liberally, almost rendering its definition meaningless. Regardless, the history of Nazi Germany should never be forgotten. Interestingly, both sides of the gun debate make mistakes when discussing gun control policy in Nazi Germany…

…Gun control may not have a path dependency toward tyranny. However, gun confiscation is an egregious form of gun control that allows authoritarians to steamroll their subjects at will. The way gun confiscation enhances the consolidation of state power is undeniable. A disarmed populace is simply no match for a repressive apparatus that has a monopoly on the use of force.

Gun rights might not guarantee victory against tyrants, but being deprived of them all but guarantees submission.

Click here to ready the entire article at Mises.org.

Digital Firearm Files Allowed Online in Gov’t Settlement

The good legal news keeps coming in. Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, reached a settlement with the US Government recently with the government agreeing that Wilson’s online publishing of design files which enable home 3-D printers to print firearms is protected by the First and Second Amendments. The linked article from Wired is a bit biased against firearms, but informative.

Five years ago, 25-year-old radical libertarian Cody Wilson stood on a remote central Texas gun range and pulled the trigger on the world’s first fully 3-D-printed gun. When, to his relief, his plastic invention fired a .380-caliber bullet into a berm of dirt without jamming or exploding in his hands, he drove back to Austin and uploaded the blueprints for the pistol to his website, Defcad.com.

He’d launched the site months earlier along with an anarchist video manifesto, declaring that gun control would never be the same in an era when anyone can download and print their own firearm with a few clicks. In the days after that first test-firing, his gun was downloaded more than 100,000 times. Wilson made the decision to go all in on the project, dropping out of law school at the University of Texas, as if to confirm his belief that technology supersedes law.

The law caught up. Less than a week later, Wilson received a letter from the US State Department demanding that he take down his printable-gun blueprints or face prosecution for violating federal export controls. Under an obscure set of US regulations known as the International Trade in Arms Regulations (ITAR), Wilson was accused of exporting weapons without a license, just as if he’d shipped his plastic gun to Mexico rather than put a digital version of it on the internet. He took Defcad.com offline, but his lawyer warned him that he still potentially faced millions of dollars in fines and years in prison simply for having made the file available to overseas downloaders for a few days. “I thought my life was over,” Wilson says.

Instead, Wilson has spent the last years on an unlikely project for an anarchist: Not simply defying or skirting the law but taking it to court and changing it. In doing so, he has now not only defeated a legal threat to his own highly controversial gunsmithing project. He may have also unlocked a new era of digital DIY gunmaking that further undermines gun control across the United States and the world—another step toward Wilson’s imagined future where anyone can make a deadly weapon at home with no government oversight.

Two months ago, the Department of Justice quietly offered Wilson a settlement to end a lawsuit he and a group of co-plaintiffs have pursued since 2015 against the United States government. Wilson and his team of lawyers focused their legal argument on a free speech claim: They pointed out that by forbidding Wilson from posting his 3-D-printable data, the State Department was not only violating his right to bear arms but his right to freely share information. By blurring the line between a gun and a digital file, Wilson had also successfully blurred the lines between the Second Amendment and the First.

“If code is speech, the constitutional contradictions are evident,” Wilson explained to WIRED when he first launched the lawsuit in 2015. “So what if this code is a gun?”

The Department of Justice’s surprising settlement, confirmed in court documents earlier this month, essentially surrenders to that argument. It promises to change the export control rules surrounding any firearm below .50 caliber—with a few exceptions like fully automatic weapons and rare gun designs that use caseless ammunition—and move their regulation to the Commerce Department, which won’t try to police technical data about the guns posted on the public internet. In the meantime, it gives Wilson a unique license to publish data about those weapons anywhere he chooses.

“I consider it a truly grand thing,” Wilson says. “It will be an irrevocable part of political life that guns are downloadable, and we helped to do that.”

Mosby Reveals Advanced Tactical Techniques

John Mosby over at Mountain Guerrilla has written a short piece about firearm fundamentals and the truth about advanced techniques.

Advanced Skills

January 15, 2018

My buddy, Paul Sharp, of Straight-Blast Gym—Illinois, and proprietor of Sharp Defense, posted the following on Social Media:

When people start talking about advanced techniques my eyes cross. There are no advanced techniques. There are fundamentals honed to perfection through conscious effort. Then there is the application of those fundamentals against ever increasing challenges. The mechanics don’t change, our understanding grows so we’re able to apply the technique against higher and higher levels of resistance. As we advance we face greater resistance and better opponents which causes our understanding of the hows, when’s and why’s to advance. The mechanics remain the same. We become advanced.

Sugar Ray Leonard’s jab wasn’t magically different. His ability to hit anyone he faced at a world class level with his jab was the difference between basic and advanced.

During his seminar JJ Machado taught us all the same guard recovery technique. A guard recovery technique I had been taught my first month of jiujitsu. His ability to apply that technique against the best grapplers in the world is the difference between basic and advanced.

Bruce Gray presented my duty pistol, (a DAO S&W 4586), from a duty rig and hit the A zone of a target that was 25 yards away in a little over 1 second. He used the same draw stroke, mount, and trigger press he had been teaching me. He didn’t teach an advanced drawstroke or trigger press. His ability to make hits in those times with less than optimal equipment was the advanced understanding and application of the technique.

The point is; there is no secret sauce aka advanced techniques. There is advanced application and there is only one way to get there. High level coaching, and practice.

This is something I’ve discussed in rifle and pistol classes for a long time now…

Click here to continue reading at Mountain Guerrilla

Gun Owners Action League Washington, 2018-2

Legislative Update from Olympia 12 January 2018

GUN RIGHTS RALLY

LEGISLATIVE CALENDAR

NEW GUN BILLS FILED

PUBLIC HEARING SCHEDULED

Somewhere between 125-150 gun rights supporters showed up at the rally
conducted on the Capitol Campus earlier today.Several legislators spoke
to the crowd, including Representatives Matt Shea (R-4), Brian Blake
(D-19), Vicki Kraft (R-17), Morgan Irwin (R-31) and Senator Phil
Fortunato (R-31).After the formal presentations ended, individual
participants visited their legislators’ offices.A big thank you to the
legislators who spoke and to all who made the trek to Olympia to show
the flag..

The following cut-off dates are proposed for bills under consideration
in the 2018 regular legislative session.As a general rule, if a bill
fails to pass a hurdle, it is considered dead for the session.Exceptions
can be made.

2 February Bills must pass out of policy committee

5 February Bills must pass out of chamber fiscal committee (only bills
with major fiscal impact)

14 February Bills must pass out of house of origin (House bills out of
House, Senate bills out of Senate)

23 February Bills must pass out of policy committee in second chamber

26 February Bills with major fiscal impact must pass out of second
chamber fiscal committee

2 March Bills must pass out of second chamber (House bills out of Senate,
Senate bills out of House), except for bills in a conference committee
to iron out differences in House/Senate versions,budget bills and
initiatives.

8 March Sine die – close of regular legislative session.

HB 2363, by Rep. Pellicciotti (D-30), makes any attempt to use a drone
to deliver a deadly weapon to an incarcerated individual a Class C
felony.SB 6146, by Sen. Saldada (D-37), repeals RCW 9.41.290, our state
preemption law, that prohibits local government from passing its own gun
laws.I believe Washington was first in the nation with this, 35 years
ago.42 states now have preemption laws. If this passes, every county,
city and town can pass their own gun control laws, a patchwork quilt of
laws that will trip up gun owners traveling across the state.SB 6247, by
Sen. Dhingra (D-45), prohibits firearm possession by individuals with a
history of violence who are not deemed competent to stand trial.

The Senate Law & Justice Committee will conduct public hearings on SBs
5992 (trigger devices), 6049 (magazine restrictions), 5444 (modern
sporting rifle registration), 5463 (safe storage) and 6146 (preemption
repeal) on 15 January at 10 a.m. in Senate Hearing Room 4, John A.
Cherberg Building.That is the only public hearing on gun bills scheduled
this week.A strong turnout would help.

BILL STATUS/GOAL POSITION:

HB 1000 Use of deadly force Doglio (D-22)H.PubSaf OPPOSE

HB 1004 Possession of firearms/state of emergency Shea (R-4)H. Jud.. SUPPORT

HB 1015 Limiting restrictions on concealed carry Shea (R-4)H. Jud.. SUPPORT

HB 1122 Safe storage of firearms Kagi (D-32)H. Rules OPPOSE

HB 1134 Assault weapon ban Peterson (D-21)H. Jud. OPPOSE

HB 1174 Firearm safety education in schools Muri (R-28)H. Edu SUPPORT

HB 1181 Prohibiting handgun sales registry Blake (D-19)H. Jud. SUPPORT

HB 1190 Prohibiting handgun sales registry Taylor (R-15)H. Jud. SUPPORT

HB 1270 Encouraging voluntary use of locking devices Harmsworth (R-44) H.
Fin. SUPPORT

HB 1380 Repeals I-594 Shea (R-4)H. Jud.. SUPPORT

HB 1381 Universal recognition of all state CPLs Blake (D-19)H. Jud.. SUPPORT

HB 1387 Assault weapons background check Jinkins (D-27)H. Jud. OPPOSE

HB 1483 Allows destruction of forfeited firearms Lovick (D-44)H. Rules OPPOSE

HB 1529 Use of force Ryu (D-32)H.Pub.Saf.  OPPOSE

HB 1592 Delivery of firearms to LEOs Klippert (R-)H. Jud. SUPPORT

HB 1725 I-594 check exemption for CPL holders Koster (R-44)H. Jud. SUPPORT

HB 1731 Certain exemptions to I-594 Jinkins (D27)H. Rules SUPPORT

HB 1900 Hunter ed funding/NRA license plates Griffey (R-35)H. Trans. NEUTRAL

HB 1933 Transfer of firearms at non-profit events Walsh (R-19)H. Jud. SUPPORT

HB 2293 Bans firearms in daycare facilities (exception) Kagi (D-32)H.
Jud OPPOSE

HB 2306 Allows licensed veterans to carry at Comm Coll Van Werven (R-)H.
Jud. SUPPORT

HB 2329 Strengthens law making CPL data private Walsh (R-19)H. Jud SUPPORT

HB 2363 Drone delivery of firearms to offenders Pellicciotti (D-30)H.
PubSaf SUPPORT

SB 5000 Use of deadly force McCoy (D-38)S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 5050 Assault weapon ban Frockt (D-3)S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 5073 Use of force McCoy (D-38)S. W&M OPPOSE

SB 5216 Firearm safety education in schools O’Ban (R-28)S. K-12 SUPPORT

SB 5441 Involuntary freeze on firearm possession Kuderer (D-)S.HumSer NEUTRAL

SB 5444 Background check for “assault weapons” Frockt (D-46)S.. L&J OPPOSE

SB 5463 Mandatory safe storage of firearms Palumbo (D-S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 5506 Transfer of firearms at non-profit events Zeiger (R-25)S.
Rules SUPPORT

SB 5553 Suicidal, waiver of rights Pedersen (D-43)S. L&J NEUTRAL

SB 5795 Mandatory firearm liability insurance Chase (D-32)S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 5992 Bans certain “trigger devices” Van De Wege (D-24)S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 6049 Bans “high capacity” magazines Frockt (D-3) S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 6146 Repeals state preemption of gun laws Saldana (D-37)S. L&J OPPOSE

SB 6297 Firearm possession with history of violence Dhingra (D-45)S.
L&J REVIEWING

HB = House bill, SB = Senate bill.L&J = Law & Justice, Jud = Judiciary,
PubSaf = Public Safety, HC = Health Care, H. K-12 = House Early
education, Aprop = Appropriations, Fin = Finance, W&M = Ways & Means“S”
before a bill number indicates Substitute (amended).

HEARINGS SCHEDULED:

15 JanSenate JudiciaryHearing Room 4, John A. Cherberg Bldg.

10:00 a.m.SBs 5992, 6049, 5444, 5463 and 6146

(18 JanHouse JudiciaryHearing Room A, John L. O’Brien Bldg)

(1:30 p.m.HB 1122 Executive session only)

LEGISLATIVE HOT LINE:You may reach your Representatives and Senator by
calling the Legislative Hotline at 1-800-562-6000.Toll free!!!The
hearing impaired may obtain TDD access at 1-800-635-9993.Also toll free!!!

1-800-562-6000TDD 1-800-635-9993

OTHER DATA:Copies of pending legislation (bills), legislative schedules
and other information are available on the legislature’s web site at
www.leg.wa.gov“.Bills are available in Acrobat (.pdf) format.You may
download a free version of Adobe Acrobat Reader from Adobe’s web site
(http://www.adobe.com).You may also obtain hard copy bills, initiatives,
etc, in the mail from the Legislative Bill Room FREE OF CHARGE by
calling 1-360-786-7573.Copies of bills may also be ordered toll free by
calling the Legislative Hotline at (800) 562-6000.You may also hear
floor and committee hearing action live at http://www.tvw.org/ (you need
“RealAudio” to do this, available free at the TVW web site).

By reading the House and Senate “bill reports” (hbr, sbr) for each bill,
you can see how individual committee members voted.By reading the “roll
call” for each bill, you can see how the entire House or Senate voted on
any bill.The beauty of the web site is that ALL this information is
available, on line, to any citizen.

GET THE WORD OUT:If you want to subscribe to the GOAL Post by e-mail,
send a message to “goalwa@cox.net “.Please pass GOAL Post on to anyone
you believe may have an interest in protecting our rights.Better yet,
make a couple of copies of this message, post it on your gun club’s
bulletin board, and leave copies with your local gun shop(s).PERMISSION
IS HEREBY GRANTED TO DUPLICATE OR RED ISTRIBUTE GOAL POST PROVIDED IT IS
REPRODUCED WITHOUT TEXTUAL MODIFICATION AND CREDIT IS GIVEN TO GOAL. I
can be reached at “jwaldron@halcyon.com” or by telephone at (425)
985-4867.Unfortunately, I am unable to mail hard copy GOAL Post to
individuals.Limited numbers of hard copies MAY be available at the
Second Amendment Foundation book table at WAC gun shows.

If you believe you have received this e-mail in error, please e-mail me
at “goalwa@cox.net” with the words “Unsubscribe GOAL Post” in the
subject line.I will remove your name immediately.Keep in mind GOAL Post
is also published on several gun lists.If you received GP via a list,
you must contact that list’s admin to unsubscribe.

Upcoming WAC gun show(s):

Monroe 13-14 January

Puyallup 20-21 January

“The right of the individual citizen to bear arms in defense of himself,
or the state, shall not be impaired, but nothing in this section shall
be construed as authorizing individuals or corporations to organize,
maintain or employ an armed body of men.”

Article 1, Section 24

Constitution of the State of Washington

Copyright 2018 Gun Owners Action League of WA

Combat Studies Group: Full Spectrum Training

From K over at Combat Studies Group, Full Spectrum Training…Does It Matter?

So I know the question is out there….why is this website supposedly devoted to the study of warfare always talking about computer security and cryptocurrency? Shouldn’t I just be posting articles about “improving your shot group” or the latest in “tactical accoutrements”? It essentially boils down to this:

1. As anyone who has attended my courses knows, I believe in what I call “The Heinlein Doctrine” (or the Competent Man principal). In essence, a warrior (or just a human being for that matter) must be good at everything…not just shooting, or grappling, or navigating.

2. Right now, technology is at the forefront of not just battle, but our everyday lives….like it or not.

3. Many believe that war lies in the not too far future of the western world. I believe that this war has already begun. Perhaps not the shooting part, but the IPB (Intelligence Preparation of the Battlespace) has begun in earnest in the technical space. We ignore this aspect of the battlefield at our greatest peril.

4. And finally, there are hundreds of sources these days for sound tactical training, but very few sources for full spectrum training exist.

***

 “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”

— Robert Heinlein (From Time Enough For Love)

 

Continue reading over at CSG by clicking here

WA Gun Bills Go into Effect

From the NRA-ILA

Source – NRA-ILA – click for article

Related – Home Alone in Washington State