MVT: AR Equipment Issues

Max Velocity Tactical has been compiling for some time lists of equipment/gear issues (and other observations) which commonly come up during their training classes for tactical rifle. Examples/excerpts below.

  • This is the second class that someone has over inserted a magazine during a drill. What happens is the magazine is shoved so far into the mag well during a combat reload that the bolt hits the back of the magazine when the bolt released is pushed. This time it was a Magpul Gen 2. Pay attention during reloads, there is no reason to put that much force into seating a mag.
  • Charging Handles- Get rid of the stock charging handles on your AR’s. Some of the ones that are being put on rifles are to easy to bind and the standard latch is to small. My recommendation is a BCM medium sized latch. It will make weapons manipulation easier.
  • Ammo- A student had an issue during the malfunction drills. The bullet was getting pushed back into the case allowing the powder to dump into the chamber. When that happens the rifle will not go into battery. You then have to clean the chamber to get rid of the powder, a toothbrush works best. The reason this is happening is due to the type of ammo, .223 Rem in this case. Most .223 doesn’t have a good crimp on the bullet when it is manufactured. 5.56 ammo will have a crimp that should prevent this from happening. I have not seen this with any 5.56 marked ammo, only with .223 Rem. I have some Federal .223 and it does the same thing. I know everyone is trying to save money when they buy ammo for class. The problem is that going cheap can bite you in the ass. Just like with going the cheapest route with a rifle, cheap ammo can cause issues. Spend a little more and buy 5.56 marked ammo.
  • Ambi-Safeties -We see this over and over. Students use the thumb to rotate the safety off and their trigger finger to rotate the safety on. This is an accident waiting to happen. When you get in a hurry your trigger finger can slip into the trigger guard and fire a round. That is not good. If you insist on having one on your rifle you have to ensure that your thumb rotates the safety on and off. My recommendation is to get rid of them.
  • Blue Loctite is your friend. BUIS, sight mounts, flashlight mounts etc. need to have blue loctite on them. This will keep them from working loose and falling off when you need it the most.
  • 80% lowers. I understand the attraction of these, especially for someone who is behind enemy lines. I have yet to see one at class that doesn’t have some sort of issue. The biggest problem I see is mag wells that aren’t to spec. A lot of times the jigs that come with them aren’t perfect either. Be aware of this.
  • Lube your rifles. Almost at the end of class one of the students rifles just quit running. Added lube and the rifle started running again. He said he didn’t put any lube on it that morning.
  • Not all charging handles are created equal. Especially doing malfunction drills. The standard CH that comes on AR’s are OK but are not the best. My recommendation is to get a BCM medium latch. It gives you more to grab when charging the rifle.
    Get a quick adjustable sling. One that you can change the length on the fly with your support hand. If you choose to attach it where the extension tube meets the lower, make sure that it cannot rotate up and get in the way of running the charging handle.

There is quite a list of equipment issues, so if you haven’t spent much time with your gear, or even if you have, it’s worth a read to see what you might be missing.

John Mosby: Guerrilla Gunfighter Volume Two Now Available

I lost track of this item coming available. I knew that John Mosby of Mountain Guerrilla had finished this second volume of his Guerrilla Gunfighter series, but at that time it was not yet available on Lulu.com where he publishes his books. Here is Guerrilla Gunfighter Volume Two: Preparedness Rifle and Carbine.  $60 plus shipping and tax.

Mountain Guerrilla Blog author “John Mosby” is back, with the second book in the Guerrilla Gunfighter series. Focused on practical, general-purpose applications of the rifle and carbine, this book includes critical issues such as positions, trigger control, multiple target scenarios, and drills for training for real-world use. Learn to shoot your rifle or carbine faster and more accurately. Covers not just modern semi-auto fighting rifles, but lever actions and pump guns as well. Whether you’re a new prepper, an old survivalist, or a militia member trying to make your group better, this book has everything you need to begin building a coherent training plan.

 

8/29/19 Update: As usual, Viking Preparedness has done a review of John Mosby’s new book. Both Mountain Guerrilla and Viking Preparedness have Patreon pages if you want to support them financially.

CSG: Tactical Skills Q & A -or- Be Good at Everything or Die

Another good interview with K from Combat Studies Group titled Tactical Skills Q & A -or- Be Good at Everything or Die.

In the interest of spreading useful information regarding tactics/training I wanted to relay this conversation I had with some folks from the tactical community a while back. I was asked several pointed questions which I do my best to answer below:

Question 1:

Of all the various training disciplines available, which one should be top of the training list right now in light of world events? Rifle training? Land Navigation? Communications? Patrolling, etc…

Answer:

Well, there are definitely some sacred cows on that list. It of course kind of depends on where you are as an individual with regard to the various skillsets, but lets assume you are a competent shooter with some basic fieldcraft under your belt….I would put information gathering on top. You could also label it Intel/Comms if you wanted. Why?

1. Intelligence drives the fight. Without it, you are just a bunch of armed guys in the woods.

2. Everyone can do it. Your 75 year old aunt can do it, your kid can do it. Not everyone can be an effective infantryman, but anyone can be eyes/ears/disseminators.

3. Right now nearly everyone sucks at it. I had a good buddy that was with CAG tell me once, “Everyone thinks our shooting is what makes us so effective, and while we are talented shooters there are certainly better out there….that is just a small part of what we do. It’s all those other skills that make the difference”.  I thought he made a very good point…..

Question 2:

What is the best fighting rifle?

Click here to read the entire article at CSG.