Cerberus Training April 2022 Firearm Classes

Cerberus Training of Goldendale, WA is holding four firearm courses in April, 2022.

Apr. 9 – 10 AR Armorer

Armorer courses are structured to provide each student with a practical understanding of the operation, critical parts gauging, and features of the class titled Firearm.

This two day class is a mixture of classroom instruction, hands-on operation and on-range live-fire, enabling each student to achieve a high degree of familiarity with the topics covered and running the firearm efficiently.

You will gain proficiency in the following areas: Cleaning, maintain, gauging, repair, build, and/or modify the specific platform. We will go over disassembly, reassembly, identification of mechanical deficiencies and corrective actions, so you will walk away knowing your firearm is reliable.

Topics Covered:
+ Basic operation and function
+ Design
+ Interaction of parts including safeties and fire control group
+ Proper safety checks
+ Disassembly & Assembly
+ Inspection of parts for excessive wear
+ Head Space
+ Maintenance and lubrication
+ Gauging and checking critical areas
+ Modification / Customization
+ Compatibility
+ Troubleshooting
+ Theory

Armorers course certificate and manual is provided to the student to keep, and tools will be provided to work on specific platforms.

The second half of Day 2 will be on the range checking proper operation, manipulation and an abbreviated Run the Gun class, which is made to instill the fundamentals of efficiency in running the specific platform.

If you would like to shoot – 250 Rounds  

Class starts at 0900

Cost $500

Apr. 23 – Foundation – Pistol

Apr. 24 – Foundation – Rifle

This 1 day Handgun or Rifle Foundation class is for those who are new to firearms. It’s also great for the casual yet competent shooter who wants to tune their skills. We ensure your training will increase your skill set, no matter your level.

We will review firearm safety, fundamentals, and proper use of the sights and trigger. We will work on loading and unloading, presentation to the target from the holster of the handgun, or sling with the rifle, ready positions and clearing malfunctions, all with skill sets and drills to improve overall efficient operation. This class is a great way to get ready for Run the Gun Handgun or Rifle.  

This class will thoroughly cover;

Safety brief & Medical plan

Firearm and Range Safety

Effective shooting stance

Proper weapon grip

Recoil control

Using iron sights, magnified and or electronic optics – Pistol or Rifle

Proper zero and confirmation.

Trigger control

Manipulation of your firearm platform

Loading – Reloading sequence

Malfunctions of the Pistol or Rifle

Sling/Holster use

and more…

Check here for Gear List and Preparing for Training;

https://cerberus-training.com/pages/gear-list

https://cerberus-training.com/pages/preparing-for-training

If you would like to shoot, bring – 250 Rounds   

Class starts at 0900

Cost $200

Apr. 30 – May 1 Bill Blowers Tap-Rack Tactical – Pistol

Bill Blowers of Tap-Rack Tactical, LLC will provide you with techniques and procedures that allow you to make hits faster under stress. This course is intended to pick up where most marksmanship training ends, it is a fighting class. We will build on previous skills, but help you to hit faster on single and multiple targets. This is accuracy done very quickly. Topics covered include fundamentals, strong and weak/support hand shooting, manipulations, malfunctions, low light and shooting on the move. Each shooter will leave with a custom dry fire training plan.

Equipment needed
Reliable semi-auto handgun
Duty, range, or concealment holster with suitable gunbelt
Enough magazines, pouches, etc., to carry a minimum of 50 rounds to the firing line
Minimum 1000 rounds of ammunition (1,000+ recommended; bring more, shoot more)
Wrap-around eye protection; ear protection; brimmed hat, weather specific clothing.
Recommended
A second gun or parts to fix your broken gun.
Note pad and pen/pencil

Cost $650

MVT: AR Equipment Issues

Max Velocity Tactical has been compiling for some time lists of equipment/gear issues (and other observations) which commonly come up during their training classes for tactical rifle. Examples/excerpts below.

  • This is the second class that someone has over inserted a magazine during a drill. What happens is the magazine is shoved so far into the mag well during a combat reload that the bolt hits the back of the magazine when the bolt released is pushed. This time it was a Magpul Gen 2. Pay attention during reloads, there is no reason to put that much force into seating a mag.
  • Charging Handles- Get rid of the stock charging handles on your AR’s. Some of the ones that are being put on rifles are to easy to bind and the standard latch is to small. My recommendation is a BCM medium sized latch. It will make weapons manipulation easier.
  • Ammo- A student had an issue during the malfunction drills. The bullet was getting pushed back into the case allowing the powder to dump into the chamber. When that happens the rifle will not go into battery. You then have to clean the chamber to get rid of the powder, a toothbrush works best. The reason this is happening is due to the type of ammo, .223 Rem in this case. Most .223 doesn’t have a good crimp on the bullet when it is manufactured. 5.56 ammo will have a crimp that should prevent this from happening. I have not seen this with any 5.56 marked ammo, only with .223 Rem. I have some Federal .223 and it does the same thing. I know everyone is trying to save money when they buy ammo for class. The problem is that going cheap can bite you in the ass. Just like with going the cheapest route with a rifle, cheap ammo can cause issues. Spend a little more and buy 5.56 marked ammo.
  • Ambi-Safeties -We see this over and over. Students use the thumb to rotate the safety off and their trigger finger to rotate the safety on. This is an accident waiting to happen. When you get in a hurry your trigger finger can slip into the trigger guard and fire a round. That is not good. If you insist on having one on your rifle you have to ensure that your thumb rotates the safety on and off. My recommendation is to get rid of them.
  • Blue Loctite is your friend. BUIS, sight mounts, flashlight mounts etc. need to have blue loctite on them. This will keep them from working loose and falling off when you need it the most.
  • 80% lowers. I understand the attraction of these, especially for someone who is behind enemy lines. I have yet to see one at class that doesn’t have some sort of issue. The biggest problem I see is mag wells that aren’t to spec. A lot of times the jigs that come with them aren’t perfect either. Be aware of this.
  • Lube your rifles. Almost at the end of class one of the students rifles just quit running. Added lube and the rifle started running again. He said he didn’t put any lube on it that morning.
  • Not all charging handles are created equal. Especially doing malfunction drills. The standard CH that comes on AR’s are OK but are not the best. My recommendation is to get a BCM medium latch. It gives you more to grab when charging the rifle.
    Get a quick adjustable sling. One that you can change the length on the fly with your support hand. If you choose to attach it where the extension tube meets the lower, make sure that it cannot rotate up and get in the way of running the charging handle.

There is quite a list of equipment issues, so if you haven’t spent much time with your gear, or even if you have, it’s worth a read to see what you might be missing.

John Mosby: Guerrilla Gunfighter Volume Two Now Available

I lost track of this item coming available. I knew that John Mosby of Mountain Guerrilla had finished this second volume of his Guerrilla Gunfighter series, but at that time it was not yet available on Lulu.com where he publishes his books. Here is Guerrilla Gunfighter Volume Two: Preparedness Rifle and Carbine.  $60 plus shipping and tax.

Mountain Guerrilla Blog author “John Mosby” is back, with the second book in the Guerrilla Gunfighter series. Focused on practical, general-purpose applications of the rifle and carbine, this book includes critical issues such as positions, trigger control, multiple target scenarios, and drills for training for real-world use. Learn to shoot your rifle or carbine faster and more accurately. Covers not just modern semi-auto fighting rifles, but lever actions and pump guns as well. Whether you’re a new prepper, an old survivalist, or a militia member trying to make your group better, this book has everything you need to begin building a coherent training plan.

 

8/29/19 Update: As usual, Viking Preparedness has done a review of John Mosby’s new book. Both Mountain Guerrilla and Viking Preparedness have Patreon pages if you want to support them financially.

CSG: Tactical Skills Q & A -or- Be Good at Everything or Die

Another good interview with K from Combat Studies Group titled Tactical Skills Q & A -or- Be Good at Everything or Die.

In the interest of spreading useful information regarding tactics/training I wanted to relay this conversation I had with some folks from the tactical community a while back. I was asked several pointed questions which I do my best to answer below:

Question 1:

Of all the various training disciplines available, which one should be top of the training list right now in light of world events? Rifle training? Land Navigation? Communications? Patrolling, etc…

Answer:

Well, there are definitely some sacred cows on that list. It of course kind of depends on where you are as an individual with regard to the various skillsets, but lets assume you are a competent shooter with some basic fieldcraft under your belt….I would put information gathering on top. You could also label it Intel/Comms if you wanted. Why?

1. Intelligence drives the fight. Without it, you are just a bunch of armed guys in the woods.

2. Everyone can do it. Your 75 year old aunt can do it, your kid can do it. Not everyone can be an effective infantryman, but anyone can be eyes/ears/disseminators.

3. Right now nearly everyone sucks at it. I had a good buddy that was with CAG tell me once, “Everyone thinks our shooting is what makes us so effective, and while we are talented shooters there are certainly better out there….that is just a small part of what we do. It’s all those other skills that make the difference”.  I thought he made a very good point…..

Question 2:

What is the best fighting rifle?

Click here to read the entire article at CSG.