New Doom and Bloom Antibiotics and Infectious Disease Book

The Altons, authors of the Doom and Bloom Survival Medicine Handbook, have released a new book, Alton’s Antibiotics and Infectious Disease: The Layman’s Guide to Available Antibacterials in Austere Settings. Their Survival Medicine Handbook has been reviewed 477 times on Amazon with an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 and was well-reviewed elsewhere, too.

…We decided to educate the family medic about how to identify various infectious diseases and the medicines that cure them and their veterinary “equivalents”.  We did this over the years in articles, videos, and podcasts.

Now, all the information we’ve accumulated is in one book: “Alton’s Antibiotics and Infectious Disease: The Layman’s Guide to Available Antibiotics in Austere Settings”

In “Alton’s Antibiotics and Infectious Disease”, we discuss:

  • How bacteria cause disease
  • How the immune system works to fight infection
  • Many different disease-causing organisms
  • Telling bacterial vs. viral disease
  • Common infectious diseases
  • Epidemic and pandemic diseases
  • How antibiotics work
  • Different antibiotic families
  • How to use antibiotics wisely
  • Issues with antibiotic resistance
  • Individual antibiotics and the diseases each one treats
  • Dosing, side effects, allergies, pregnancy and pediatric considerations
  • Expiration Dates
  • Establishing an epidemic sick room
  • Dealing with wound infections
  • Wound care
  • Supplies for the effective austere medic
  • Much more

A non-medical person having antibiotics on hand in disaster settings is considered controversial by the conventional medical wisdom, and for good reason. Yet, if there is no ambulance coming to render aid or hospital to treat the sick, you may become the end of the line with regards to the well-being of loved ones. Just as learning how to stop bleeding is important, learning about infection and the medicines that treat it will save lives in difficult times…

The supplies section of the book includes lists of contents for various medical kits: individual first aid kit (IFAK), family kit, dental tray, natural remedy supplies, up to and including a field hospital.

Related:

Breitbart: 80 Percent of Venezuelans Short of Food

Combined with chronic malnutrition, the report also points to the scale of the collapse of the country’s health system, with practically every major health condition ranging from tuberculosis to malaria reaching crisis levels. For example, the number of malaria cases has risen from 36,000 in 2009 to 406,000 in 2017, while 87 percent of HIV patients now do not receive their necessary drugs…Most of these conditions are going untreated, mainly due to a lack of necessary medical resources and trained specialists.

The Medic Shack: Salmonella

Chuck over at the Medic Shack has another good, informative article up, this time about salmonella – how to treat it, how to avoid it, what to watch for.

Salmonella. Is it or is not not an emergency

Outbreak of Multi drug-Resistant Salmonella Infections Linked to Raw Chicken Products

That is the title on the CDC page a couple of weeks ago. Salmonella is bad enough by itself, but a multi drug resistant variety is worse.

Salmonella is a bacteria that is common in poultry. Its why people recommend to cook it completely to kill the bacteria. Salmonella infection is usually caused by eating raw or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs or egg products. The incubation period ranges from several hours to two days. Most salmonella infections can be classified as stomach flu (gastroenteritis). Possible signs and symptoms include:

• Nausea

• Vomiting

• Abdominal cramps

• Diarrhea

• Fever

• Chills

• Headache

• Blood in the stool

A good portion of people generally have no symptoms from salmonella infections. Others develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps within eight to 72 hours. Most healthy people recover within a few days without specific treatment.. However people younger than 5 and older than 70, people with depressed immune systems, or in a weakened state can get sicker or even die from it. As of October, Ninety-two people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis have been reported from 29 states.

So what does this have to do with prepping. Or with survival? Oh I forgot to mention this current strain is multi drug resistant?

The major reason I want to talk about this is a lot of us buy in bulk. Some of us can it, some freeze. And some even freeze dry it. Any mistake in any of these methods can pack away some real bad news when we are at our weakest. Proper processing is a news letter for a different day. But back to salmonella. Salmonella is a huge concern for preppers. And now with a multi drug variant in the wild we need to take extra care…

In the modern world salmonella is rarely fatal. The elderly. Compromised immune system. Under 1 year old. Those are the groups that normally have the worst outcomes. And even then it is rare. Now add in poor living conditions. Exhaustion. Poor nutrition. Poor food prep. Hostile environment. You now have the recipe for disaster…

Ceftriaxone, amoxicillin or cephalosporin are decent antibiotics for salmonella. But a caveat needs to be inserted. They are good if it is a COMPLICATED case. That means if it has entered the blood stream and is causing Septicemia. Or has passed the blood brain barrier and entered the central nervous system. This is getting way out of the realm of a ditch medic. A MD, PA or NP is needed here.

Do not administer antibiotics to people suffering from uncomplicated cases. What happens, is studies show that a large relapse rate occurs. It can lengthen the time of how long a person is infectious. And has caused the resistant forms of it to appear. Also anti diarrhea meds like Imodium while slowing down the diarrhea can actually extend the time of the illness.

So is it food poisoning or is it viral?…

Click here to read the entire article at The Medic Shack.