Backdoor Survival: What the Iran Conflict Means for Preparedness

Iran protesters burn a U.S. flag.

What The Iran Conflict Means For Preparedness is written by Samantha Biggers over at Backdoor Survival. While the article was written before the results of the missile attacks on US bases in Iraq was widely known, that isn’t really relevant for the article. Some people breathed a sigh of relief when Iran essentially said “We’re done. Take that USA.” But we don’t really know that Iran’s response is over, and it probably isn’t. The explosion/crash of Boeing 737 in Iran shortly after Iran’s statement is suspicious and could be an attempt by Iran to make a larger impact on the US economy as well as well-known US corporation. There were secondary missile attacks on the US embassy in Baghdad by Iran-backed Iraqi militias last night. Cyber threats from Iran continue. So the conflict is not over, and could heat up even more over uranium enrichment.

The conflict with Iran has many people very fearful. To be honest the whole thing has made me do a lot of thinking. I don’t want to go over the politics of the situation with you because guess what: there are a lot of things that all people have in common if they want to stay safe and protect their families from hardship on all levels.

A lot of the things I am going to talk about are things that you may already have covered and honestly should be prepared for anyway. One of the beautiful things about well planned prepping is that you can use a lot of the things that you put back even if you are lucky enough to never experience any major event. As the old saying goes, better safer than sorry…

Click here to read the entire article at Backdoor Survival.

Backdoor Survival: Going Stealth When Using a Generator

Going Stealth When Using Generators: Lessons From Venezuela comes from Jose Martinez in an article at Backdoor Survival. Jose Martinez was able to flee Venezuela and make a life elsewhere, but shares what he learned in the chaos in various articles.

…This long introduction is only meant to open your eyes so you can understand the attitude and behavior of the people who very likely will be roaming in the streets after or while the collapse is occurring. There will be some pockets where the situation won’t be that bad, but won’t be too many, and perhaps far away from each other. More about that in the next articles.

Not all of your neighbors may be good.

Let´s go on topic now. I´m sure there is plenty of preppers around there with generators and a huge fuel tank. Many of us even with a propane system as a backup. Great. We all agree that, under some type of threat, and the power grid is shut down in our nearby area, we´ll turn on our generator, and start to count how many hours it´s on, and check the fuel level every few hours.

Hopefully, you´ll have a battery rack large enough to have some lights and heating on for a while, when the generator is off to save fuel. It should be possible to replenish the tank, after all. This will depend, of course, on every different situation. I know something for real: we can´t prep for everything.

But we can prepare for some general situations that are going to generate some type of scarcity. The difficult part here, and I speak from my own experience, is the calculation of how much time that contingency is going to last.

We were more or less prepared for civilian turmoil and general disorder that could make us bugging in. Time proved us wrong. Dangerously wrong. I´ve mentioned this in other articles, though. Let´s keep going with this…

It´s astonishing to learn how silence can rule over the land when there is no electricity. When we were still living in Venezuela, the worst of the blackouts (even for me, a lover of peace and quiet) was the silence. It was good for some purpose, though, because sometimes it would allow to detect early presence of undesirable or threatening individuals, like those running in small Chinese motorbikes all over the place, with two guys, the one in the backseat generally armed with a 9mm or a .38 revolver. Those would rob everyone within their reach.

Once a small engine motorcycle is detected, everyone looks for getting out the way in Venezuela. If your generator is too loud, you won´t hear inside your home what can be happening outside, and we can’t be monitoring our CCTV surveillance cameras (and if you don´t have them, get them. Now, when they´re on the cheap, and PLEASE conceal them. Don´t be a smart a$$ and leave them in the open as a “deterrent” to someone knocks them down with a silenced .22 and blind your eyes outside). If you are nearby the sound source it´s very likely you won´t be able to hear anything going on around. This is a very powerful reason to think carefully about where we put money in. There are quite expensive generators, liquid-cooled, where the coolant act as a soundproof layer, and with specially designed casings to quieten the sound. Of course, you can imagine how expensive these machines are. They worth it, though, for those who can´t or won´t bug out to a secluded location and prefer to stay put in their place. I can accept that…

Backdoor Survival: 3 Proven Profitable Activities in a Collapse, Venezuelan Edition

This article was written by Jose Martinez, an eyewitness to the collapse of Venezuela, for Backdoor Survival. It details three occupations that are allowing people to continue to survive in Venezuela – small scale farmer, plumber, and electrician.

The worst part of the economic collapse has already passed and people have slowly understood that they can´t keep working to receive useless and worthless currency.

The mafia has injected (illegally, I guess, as the most parts of what they do) hundreds of tons of dollars to increase the liquidity they destroyed themselves, with shadowy intentions.

Maybe not so shadowy after all, if we see the hundreds of kilos of all kinds of drugs that “someone” is smuggling all over the place.

How this amount of illegal product circulates in our roads and gets through the airports, is a mystery for me as a civilian. Unless, of course, those responsible to keep the country safe are busy in some other “activity”…

This is not intended to be a list compiling what you should study to be the most wanted employee in the next collapse. It’s just a simple, reliable and proven testimony of how some people, who could not or would not flee and leave our beloved and sunny country behind, are surviving and getting enough food on their table, medicines, clothing, and generally sneaking into the dark waters of this induced collapse á-lá Cuban…

1. Small Scale Farming and Food Production

This seems obvious? It is not. Small farms in Venezuela never were excessively productive, with some honorable exceptions I personally know of. It takes a lot of hard, back-breaking work. Being smaller, usually, owners don’t invest in tons of machinery, even if they could have afforded them at some time. They may have some grinding equipment, for cattle feed and such. Small tractors are found expensive for many owners. I know because they have talked to me about this and listened.

Cheap Chinese spare parts could make equipment fail in the worst possible moment and ruin the entire crop, so they prefer renting or trading in some way when they need plowing or some kind of tractor work. They hire laborers to crop, or rent the needed machinery, once again…

Click here to read the entire article at Backdoor Survival.

Backdoor Survival: Become More Medically Self-Reliant

Backdoor Survival has an article up on using essential oils to become more self-reliant medically, including examples and instructions. Here’s an excerpt from Become More Medically Self-Reliant: Put Essential Oils to Work for You. It’s a bit lengthy, but it may give you a good start on using essential oils if you have been hesitant to try them.

When people first purchase essential oils they are excited to use them and to discover their benefits but sadly, a good percentage of those purchasers fail to move ahead and often don’t learn how to use them with much success. In fact, I know quite a few people who have good oils languishing in their cupboards for want of knowledge. This article gives suggestions and examples that may motivate a robust use of the essential oils you already have or have been thinking about trying.

Once understood and mastered and their efficacy established by successful application, there may be a desire to find other oils and other ways to include them in your home and emergency medical preparedness.  It is exciting to see a medical problem solved by an essential oil or a healing herb and thereby feeling a little more medically self- reliant, moving step by step. This knowledge is only acquired through using the oils correctly and experiencing what they can do to improve a medical concern. My small personal experiences build more confidence and put one more tool into my medical bag to help my family and others who may ask for help.

essential oils work for you

 

Three Successful Examples of Oil Use

Here are three examples of the many ways oils have worked. Please forgive me for sharing personal experiences. I do this with the hope that these stories will help others see that if essential oils worked for me, they may also work for you…making us all more medically prepared and better able to care for ourselves in our ailments and small accidents now and in harder times…

Click here to read the entire article at Backdoor Survival.