The Medic Shack: Learning Prepper Medicine in a Pandemic

Chuck at The Medic Shack talks about how he and others have made changes to the way that they teach prepper medicine as a result of effects from the current pandemic in Learning Prepper Medicine in a Pandemic.

TIMELINE; UNITED STATES. November-2019-January 2020

November 2019. Thanksgiving day. The world is “normal” In America we cooked, feasted and sat down to the “Big Game.

December 2019 Christmas Day. The world changed. Most here in America didn’t notice. A few of us preppers were chatting on Signal, Wickr, and other groups about this new bug in China. The rest of the US was opening presents , feasting and sitting down for the Big Game.

January 2020. The Pepper side of the internet EXPLODED with pages on the Novell Coronavirus 2019. We published our first blog about it in January. The rest of America recovered from the obligatory New Years hangover. Watched the game and some started saying Hey, WTF is this virus that is taking out the hippies in Seattle?

The Change in Prepper Medicine.

Over the last year, we have changed. No not the change in the country. Medicine has changed. How has going to your doctor changed? Getting a procedure done in a hospital? Buying medicine at the local drug store? “Western” or a better turn is Modern medicine has changed, and may never totally go back to what it was. Prepper or Survival medicine has changed also. What we used to teach in person, we now do via the web. Mail order vs in person buying. The demand for help in fighting this virus from a alternative manner has skyrocketed. That has both helped and hurt people. Help by us with the dedication, morals and the skill to do the very best for people. And hurt by those of us that are more interested in the dollar than our job a healers.

What to watch for.

First off watch out for the wild claims. Way back in 2014 Young Living Essential Oil consultants NOT Young Living itself, had ads on websites and social media that the FDA found that some claimed that Young Living proprietary blend of oils would “cure” Ebola.

FDA Letter to Young Living

Now I’m no fan of the FDA, And certainly no fan of Young Living oils.

*Point of clarification here. I am a fan of EO’s My wife is getting pretty damn good with them. Also the oils made by Young Living are good oils. I am just not a fan of the company, nor SOME of the distributors/consultants. Some that sell Young Living are friends of mine. I feel that there are comparable and possibly better oils at better prices from other places with out the sales pitch and sales pressure that SOME consultants use.

TMS Live

Y’all may remember the episode Cat and I did on this exact topic I found the archive and listened to it. And 6 years later I still agree with Cat’s and my castigation of it. Young Living and the “Oil Dropper” were both wrong. I hate to say that the FDA was correct, but this time they were. But that period of being right, has made it REAL tough to do what I do.

What happened

And after 6 years of reading and re-reading the warning letter, I am torn on the FDA’s letter. Part says YES!!!! It’s about time! Another part says, Hmmm, I sometimes use similar descriptions as the consultants use. Wording is everything! The FDA is murder on anything that implies that an oil or herb compound stick tool or ANYTHING not approved by te FDA can treat or cure any disease. The “Act” Or known as 201(g)(1)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 U.S.C. § 321(g)(1)(B) says ANY item that says or is implied they are intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.

What we can do.

This make it very difficult for the herbalist, alternative medicine practitioner to help people overcome illness and injury. Remember we are not doctors. We cannot treat, prescribed or give any medical advice. In the current state of affairs of the country, that is the law of the land. We are teachers of the body. We teach people to heal themselves with what they have on hand.

It sounds like we are just giving up, We’re not. We’re just taking a different approach to the same ends.

Lets take a look at one of the violations.

On the website, http://www.theoildropper.com, under the heading, “Young Living Versus Ebola Virus”:

  • Under the subheading, “Be Prepared”:

Since I have become an avid Young Living essential oil user I have learned all about the anti-microbial properties of so many oils, including ANTI-VIRAL constituents in many of our essential oils.”

Viruses (including Ebola) are no match for Young Living Essential Oils”

  • Under the subheading, “Top Oil Choices for Viruses”:

Top on my list is Thieves. Thieves is highly anti-microbial . . . it could help against Ebola.”

Ebola Virus can not live in the presence of cinnamon bark (this is in Thieves) nor Oregano.” [sic]

ImmuPower by Young Living would be a top choice as well. ImmuPower is a blended oil containing (oregano, clove, frankincense, ravintsara, cistus, mountain savory and hyssop). Every single one of these individual oils has anti-viral properties.”

The first two entries are bad descriptions The out right say the oils WILL help with viruses. A alternative medicine person cannot say XYZ oik will do PDQ Thing IE including ANTI-VIRAL constituents in many of our essential oils. And “Viruses (including Ebola) are no match for Young Living Essential Oils”

Now the next item. Hell I’ve used descriptors like this one:

Top on my list is Thieves. Thieves is highly anti-microbial . . . it could help against Ebola.”

Yes, it is a known fact that the individual oils in Thieves oil are anti-microbial

Antibactrial propertied of essential oils

This study shares the oils and what bacteria were killed by the oils.

Hell I’ve said the same thing, and have since taken stuff like that off of my websites.

And the end of the sentence, “ it could help against Ebola.” It sounds harmless enough, and it really is. And its wrong. This person made the statement of It could help against Ebola. This falls under the FDA’s Mitigation of disease. The “it could help against” is a mitigation of care.

Well, what do we do now?

My partner in crime and I have talked about this. Teach. By teaching the use and actions of herbs and other non traditional methods we eliminate the “mitigation, treatment and curing of disease or illness”, by moving it from the here and now to the “Hypothetical” And/or Educational aspects of medicine.

Education is the key

Add to the education is the list of supplies needed. Using this method we can supply to the two most valuable things for a prepper herbalist. The knowledge. And quality supplies at fair prices, or links to get the supplies from elsewhere.

To start this off Cat Ellis is offering her Herbal Skills Intensive course. For the folks who follow and read Pagan Preparedness there is a $50.00 limited time coupon code. This is fantastic class. This gives you the grounding you need to start healing yourself and your family. In the check out type in TMS50 for $50.00 off the course price. And coming real soon, The Medic Shack in conjunction with The Herbal Prepper will be re-working and improving our Wound Care in Austere Environments. Totally revamped we can’t wait to get it finished and online for you!

And Finally.

I know I’ve said this in the past. I apologize for the lack of posting on a regular basis. I’m trying! 🙂 I will say I will do my very best to get more content on line, get our classes going, both live and virtual. And tp be more responsive to comments. To help with that, email me direct at Medic AT Themedicshack.net My spam filters are set pretty high on that account. Y’all would not believe the crap I get sent. From a lawyer in Bumfukistant that has USD 29 million waiting for my SSAN and bank information, to ED prevention, to how my car warranty on my 2001 Jeep Cherokee has expired! ( I really need to jump on that!) Email me and I’ll put your question up on the web page.

OH!! One more thingMedic AT Themedicshack.net

Facebook for The Medic Shack is about done. I’m permabanned from FB on both my accounts. I have partners in crime that will post to The Medic Shack FB page. That being said, Find us on Mewe at  The Medic Shack on Mewe

The Herbal Prepper: Respiratory Relief Tea

Who’s up for a healing, herbal tea when you start feeling a bit Ill? Certainly me, for one. Cat Ellis, The Herbal Prepper, has a nice, lengthy post on making an herbal tea for the remedy of cold/flu/respiratory issues – Respiratory Relief Tea.

This tea is one of my favorite cold and flu season remedies. I make it every year, tweaking it a little bit each time. I make this in large batches in September in anticipation for cold and flu season.

Around the house, I nicknamed it, “herbal tussin tea”. I wrote one version of my tea blend here. In my book, Prepper’s Natural Medicine, I list is as “Respiratory Infection Tea”. Since it addresses common, respiratory symptoms, and not any specific infection, I’ve renamed it, “Respiratory Relief Tea”.

I have also updated this recipe to allow for more effective tea-making techniques. It blends cold infusion, hot infusion, and decoction preparations.

Want the Lazy Version?

If you want an easier method with fewer steps, check out my easier version here. It’s less of a potent remedy, but it has fewer steps and is still effective.

Relief for Common Respiratory Complaints

The herbs in this tea are a blend of expectorant, decongestant, diaphoretic, analgesic, immunostimulant and demulcent herbs. This will support your body as it heals from a respiratory infection by:

  • Making coughing more productive and easier.
  • Supporting natural immune response.
  • Soothing irritated mucosal tissues.

Methods Used

This preparation is a bit more involved than my previously published respiratory tea recipes. Once you get the hang of it, it’s really not that hard.

This tea utilizes three different water extraction methods:

  1. Cold Infusion
  2. Decoction
  3. Hot Infusion

Cold infusions are made by steeping herbs in room temperature water for 4 to 8 hours. I tend to make them in mason jars, filling the jar 1/4 of the way. Then I fill the with water and secure the lid.

I use tend to use wide mouth jars for ease of filling and emptying the jars. I also use left-over lids from canning, or these reusable, plastic lids.

Decoctions are made by simmering hard plant material, such as roots and bark. To 4 cups of water, add between 1/2 and 1 cup of herbs, depending upon your needs and how concentrated you want your end product. Add the herbs to a pot of cold water, bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Allow to simmer for 20 minutes, and the water will have reduced by half. Strain, and the resulting liquid is your decoction.

Hot infusions are made by steeping delicate plant parts, such as leaves and flowers, in hot water. I use anywhere from 1 tablespoon up to 4 tablespoons per 1 cup (8oz) of water, depending upon how strong I want the end result.

Measurements

I have listed the ingredients by volume, not by weight. For example, I measure by cup, not by ounces. So, 1 cup equals 1 part.

If you want a smaller batch, use a 1/2 cup or a even 1/4 cup to represent your measurement of “1 part”, and maintain the ratios throughout.

Weighing everything would be more precise, but I haven’t found weighing everything out to exact amounts to matter much with this tea.

How to Make Respiratory Relief Tea

Follow the instructions below on how to make the Cold Infusion Phase, the Decoction Phase, and the Hot Infusion Phase.

Here are the steps to combine the phases:

  1. Make the cold infusion phase first.
  2. Use the resulting liquid as the water for your decoction.
  3. Strain out the herbs and reserve the liquid.
  4. Reheat the decoction (the liquid) if needed to just before boiling.
  5. Add the herbs for the hot infusion, turn off the heat, and cover.
  6. Allow herbs to steep covered for at least 15 minutes.

This takes a bit of time from beginning to end. I suggest making it in larger batches, once a day, and reheat just before consuming.

Honey is a perfect addition to this tea, as it helps to both sweeten the tea and to relax coughing. If you are diabetic and cannot have honey, you can sweeten your tea with something like this monkfruit-based syrup.

Respiratory Relief Tea- Cold Infusion Phase

Ingredients

  • 3 parts slippery elm
  • 1 part marshmallow root
  • 4 parts room temperature water

Directions

  • Combine slippery elm bark and marshmallow root
  • Cover with the water, and allow to steep at room temperature between 4-8 hours.
  • Strain, reserve liquid and discard the plant material.
  • Store cold infusion in refrigerator for up to 2 days if needed.
  • Use this as the water for the decoction phase

There are concerns with slippery elm, as it is an endangered wild plant. If you can, buy organic. That should ensure that it came from a managed population, not from a wild population that might have been overharvested. Otherwise, feel free to substitute Siberian elm instead, or just use 100% marshmallow root.

A quart mason jar will allow for 1 cup of plant material and 4 cups of water. This is the correct ration of plant material to water, and the jars have easy-to-read measurements on the side of each jar.

Use cut and sifted instead of powdered forms. Powdered slippery elm and marshmallow will be much more difficult to strain out. It’s a mess. Ask me how I know…(continues)

Click here to read the entire article in full glory at The Herbal Prepper.

Related:

Wholefully: 5 Cold-Busting Herbal Tea Blends

Learning Herbs: Hyssop Oxymel: A Cold, Flu and Bronchitis Home Remedy

Organic Prepper: Why COVID-19 Could Be the Pandemic that Changes Everything

Cat Ellis, the herbal prepper and author of The Wuhan Coronavirus Survival Manual, has written an article about the coronavirus for The Organic Prepper. There is still a lot that we don’t know about the coronavirus, but we do know that it is highly contagious. There is still some question about the fatality rate, but estimates are still above 2% which is many times the rate for influenza but about the same as for the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918.

…What was not known from the beginning was the rate of transmission and what percentage of people who become infected will become seriously or critically ill.

Worldometers breaks down the number of total active cases into mild and serious/critical categories. As of February 24, 2020, about 82% have a mild illness, and about 18% have a serious/critical illness requiring hospitalization. This is up from a rate of approximately 13% serious/critical cases just a few weeks ago.

Could this mean that the virus is mutating to become more dangerous? Possibly. But it could also just mean that as more data is collected, this additional data gives us a clearer picture of the real case fatality rate. Remember that the data we’ve received from China all along has been questionable. As the virus spreads to countries with more transparency, what we thought we knew is bound to change.

The same source cites the rate of transmission at between 2 to 3, meaning if there were a room with 10 people, and a person infected with this virus entered the room, you could reasonably expect 2 to 3 people to also become infected. For perspective, that is also 2 to 3 times as contagious as the flu.

The Worldometers coronavirus tracker, which is in line with several other coronavirus trackers from Johns Hopkins, BNO News, and Visa List, also lists the results of closed cases, i.e. cases with an actual outcome. Of the known outcomes, 91% recovered and 9% were fatal. What this means is that out of all the confirmed COVID-19 cases, about 18% will lead to serious or critical illness requiring hospital-level care and that 9% of that subset will die.

What about that 2% mortality rate? Part of the problem with calculating a case fatality rate is that you can’t actually know the true mortality rate (case fatality rate) until the outbreak is completely over. Until then, there are still cases without an outcome. In COVID-19, there are thousands more cases without outcomes yet.

The case fatality rate of 9% comes from taking the total cases of fatalities (2,701) and dividing it by the total number of cases with outcomes (30,334), then multiplying by 100 to get a case fatality rate of almost 9%…

If this virus continues to spread, it would be reasonable to expect massive disruptions to modern life, manufacturing, shipping, and shortages of all kinds. The number of fatalities from other illnesses, accidents, and lack of services would be in addition to the fatalities from the coronavirus itself. If you are preparing for this, remember that you aren’t just preparing for a cushy 2-week staycation. You’re preparing for something that affects many other facets of your life.

The entire system will be at risk in the event of a massive outbreak and shortages of all sorts could soon follow…

While containment still remains the mainstay of WHO and CDC policy, if we pay attention to what our government, military, and world health agencies are telling us, they are preparing for a full-on coronavirus pandemic.

We have authorities in infectious disease telling us to have food and plans in place in the event you suddenly find yourself under travel restrictions or in a full-blown, lock-down quarantine. I’m not sure what else there is to say except this is not a drill.

I hope that containment will still save the day. Perhaps we will do better in the United States than some others will, and not see COVID-19 spread any further, unlike Italy with large clusters forming seemingly overnight, leading to school and work closings in multiple cities.

While I always hope for the best, I also always plan for the worst. You won’t get much time to prepare if things begin spreading rapidly where you are. You’d be wise to do so ahead of time.

Click here to read the entire article at The Organic Prepper.

Organic Prepper: Fire Cider – How to Make a Remedy for the Flu

Herbalist and author Cat Ellis writes this post about Fire Cider, a flu remedy, for The Organic Prepper. Cat Ellis also has her own web site Herbal Prepper.

Fire Cider: How to Make a Fast, Effective Remedy for the Flu

One of my favorite remedies for cold and flu season is fire cider. It’s loaded with anti-inflammatory, immune-supporting, and decongestant herbs. Best of all, it’s super simple to make. Even though the combination sounds bizarre, it’s actually tasty in a sweet and sour kind of way.

Fire cider can be made entirely with items from the grocery store, or customized with more exotic herbs from an herb shop. I even have an “instant” version to share with you…

When we have the flu, we feel congested, achy, feverish, and have a bad cough. The traditional recipe for fire cider is loaded with simple, familiar, yet potent, ingredients which address each of those complaints.

Garlic

Garlic is well-known for its immune-supporting effects. It also acts as an expectorant and an anti-inflammatory, which helps those painful coughs and body aches. It is also known as a diaphoretic, which means it causes the body to sweat. This helps to reduce fevers naturally. Thankfully, fresh garlic is a common ingredient in most grocery stores.

Onion

Onion and garlic are both alliums, and therefore are related plants. They also share some similarities in properties. The unassuming onion is a potent expectorant and eases coughs. Onion is often used in cough syrups for this reason. Onions are so accessible in every store, please do use fresh onion.

Ginger

Warming ginger root also helps to induce sweating and fever reduction. Ginger also acts as an antispasmodic, which helps to ease those terrible coughing fits. It is highly recommended to use fresh ginger root (technically, it’s a rhizome, but no one ever bothers to call it that).

Horseradish

Horseradish is excellent for relieving congestion. It is also an effective diaphoretic (sweat-inducing/fever-reducing) herb. On top of that, horseradish is also an expectorant. What could be better for the flu? Sometimes, horseradish can be hard to find at the grocery store. It is in the mustard family, so go ahead and substitute some crushed mustard seed or mustard powder if you need to.

Cayenne

Cayenne is hot, but it is also a superior anti-inflammatory. I use it every time I’m congested to relieve the inflammation in my sinuses which make the sensation of congestion worse. This hot pepper can also get a congested nose running again, making blowing your nose a lot more productive. You can use any kind of hot pepper you wish. You can use fresh hot peppers, cayenne powder, or red pepper flakes.

Turmeric

Is there anyone left who doesn’t know that turmeric is anti-inflammatory? Because of this, turmeric is a huge help for reducing that achy feeling we get with the flu. There’s only one grocery store near me that sells it fresh. If you can find it fresh, great. If not, use the powdered herb.

Apple cider vinegar

Of all natural health products, apple cider vinegar has probably more health claims to it than any other. I’m dubious about most of these claims. However, it is a good menstruum (solvent) to extract the benefits out of the other ingredients. It also does seem to help ease coughing and congestion. I stick with the raw apple cider vinegar, and thankfully, this is also a common grocery store item.

Lemon

There is just something so wonderful about lemon. It lends both its bright flavor and its powerful decongestant properties to this recipe. You can use fresh lemon slices or add lemon juice at the end. Also, play with adding lime and other citrus fruits for fun.

Honey

Honey is effective at calming coughs. Our kids’ pediatrician was thrilled when we told her we keep bees, as cough suppressants had been found ineffective for children, while honey had been shown effective as a cough suppressant. Honey lends the sweet flavor to this hot, sweet, and sour remedy. Honey is added at the end…

I know, I know, a lot of people are thinking, “It takes two weeks or longer to make, but I”m sick now!” That’s ok, I’ve got you covered with an instant version. Check out the video below to see how this herbal wizardry comes together.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soYIDALYoeQ

Click here to read the entire article. If you don’t want to, or can’t, watch the videos, the article has the text instructions for making the two-week fire cider.

Related:

The Medic Shack: The Late but Useful Obligatory Cold and Flu Post