TACDA: Food Storage Planning

Here is an older article from the American Civil Defense Association‘s Journal of Civil Defense about planning food storage for emergencies.

“All is safely gathered in, ere the winter storms begin” are    lyrics from the   popular Christian hymn, “Come, Ye Thankful People Come.” Throughout history people have prepared during the plentiful harvests of all for the upcoming winter when food would be scarce and the time to harvest past.  Great comfort could be found in stores of food which would see families through the cold winter. Lack  of  stores  could  result  in hunger,  illness  and  even  death  before  a chance for another harvest.

While winter storms are still an important consideration, our society has a system in place where fresh fruits and vegetables, along with a wide variety of foods, are available year round at local markets. There is little consideration  given  to  preparing  for  the  upcoming  winter  because  of  a  year  round bountiful harvest.  May we suggest this false sense of security may prove to be disastrous?

In  addition  to  winter  storms,  there are  other  dangers  to  consider–  man-made  disasters  such  as  war,  terrorism, EMP (electromagnetic pulse), food contamination,  riots,  civil  unrest  and  the list goes on; as well as natural disasters including earthquakes, hurricanes, fires, floods,  drought,  famine  and  epidemics, which may strike with little or no warning.    We  need  not  look  far  to  see  evidence  of  these  dangers  throughout  the world.    The best way to protect our family is to take personal action.

In this article we will give you information  which  will  help  you  develop  a workable  food  storage  plan  unique  to your  family’s  needs  and  preferences. Then you can take that information and get to work.

Click here to download/read the article (pdf)

The American Civil Defense Assoc.: Radiation Issues

The American Civil Defense Association recently posted a blog post about Radiation Issues reposted from their Journal of Civil Defense after many readers had questions regarding North Korea.

The explosion of a nuclear bomb in the city.

 

The nuclear threat from North Korea has prompted many callers during the past few weeks, asking about the effects and attenuation of radiation.  There is a great deal of misinformation about radiation from fallout. The following old rule of thumb for shelter design still holds true. NBC shelters should have four feet of dirt cover, or three feet of concrete cover to give a minimum PF level of 1,000 from fallout. If a “rainout” should occur, or if the sheltered area is within 1.5 miles of a potential primary target, the shelter will require a minimum of eight to ten feet of cover. Shelter entrances require careful engineering, as most of the radiation exposure will come from these entrance areas.

I recently reviewed a series of articles about Nuclear Weapons Effects, written by Carsten Haaland, of the Oak Ridge national Laboratory. The entire series of articles can be found in our Journal of Civil Defense published in 1990. Some of you may be fortunate enough to still possess these journal articles. I have re-typed, in part, the section on ‘Fallout’ and ‘Rainout’ for this current article.

 FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR DETONATIONS

Carsten M. Haaland, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

 What is Fallout?

Fallout is the radioactive dust that comes back to earth as a result of a nuclear explosion at the surface of the earth, or at an altitude low enough for the fireball to engulf solid materials. Fallout dust may look like sand, ash or crystals, depending on the kind of material engulfed by the fireball. If the material engulfed is ordinary earth or sand the fallout will look like sand, but if the engulfed material contains calcium to the extent found in concrete buildings or coral, the fallout may look like ashes. Large dense particles will descend faster than very small particles. For this reason, fallout particles several hundred miles downwind from a nuclear surface burst will be very small, somewhat like particles in atmospheric pollution, and the nuclear radiation from the fallout will be greatly reduced.

The danger of fallout arises from the intense and highly penetrating nuclear radiation emitted from it, which produces a potentially lethal hazard to people in the vicinity unless they have protection. Large areas, covering hundreds to thousands of square miles, depending on the yield and number of surface detonations, can be poisoned with fallout such that radiation from the contaminated area is hazardous or lethal to an unprotected person passing through or dwelling in the area, for periods of days to weeks after the detonations.

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