May is National Stop the Bleed Month

The top cause of preventable death in trauma is bleeding. 20% of people who have died from traumatic injuries could have survived with quick bleeding control.

May is National Stop the Bleed Month, bringing Bleeding Control (B-CON) Instructors and students together for a month of training – free of charge in many places. Go to bleedingcontrol.org to find a class.

On Saturday May 11th, Dr. Jacobo Rivero will be teaching a free stop the bleed class in Prosser from 9:00 am to 11:00 am. The class will also be taught on June 8th and July 13th at the same location and hour.

Call 786-6601 to RSVP for Dr. Rivero’s classes. Space is limited.

Location: PMH Vineyard Conference Room
723 Memorial St, Prosser, WA

In Umatilla, the course will be taught on May 22nd at the Good Shepherd Medical Center conference room 2 from 8:00 am – 11:00 am. Call 541-667-3509 to register.

Related:
Prehospital tourniquets in civilian settings significantly decreased mortality

Doom and Bloom: Important Aspects of Tactical Combat Casualty Care

Dr. Alton at Doom and Bloom Medicine has a short article and video dealing with Tactical Combat Casualty Care.

You may have heard me reference something called “TCCC” in previous articles, podcasts, or videos. TCCC, sometimes called T3C or T triple C, is a term that means Tactical Combat Casualty Care. It represents the recommendations with regards to prehospital care of soldiers who have incurred traumatic injuries on the battlefield. Established in the mid-1990s, TCCC guidelines have become so widely accepted that many law enforcement and civilian medical personnel have adopted them.

And well they should. These protocols were developed at the cost of painful lessons in the field in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is thought that there were 1000 preventable deaths in these conflicts. If you add civilian injuries during the same time period, the number of preventable deaths might number in the hundreds of thousands. The TCCC’s primary goals is to save lives, prevent additional casualties, and, in true military fashion, complete the mission…In survival settings, you can’t duplicate the care given at a field hospital or a trauma center. Your final outcomes won’t always be happy. You might, however, use some of the methods in MARCH/PAWS to possibly save the life of those who would otherwise die during or in the aftermath of a disaster…

 

First Aid and Medical Kit Contents

The following information on first aid and medical kits is excerpted from the Survival & Austere Medicine manual. It reproduces in part the section on medical kits based on increasing comprehensiveness. Minor changes have been made in order and figure numbering. The manual goes into additional detail about each of the categories of kit contents, and what you want to look for in those products. This high-level overview leans more toward supplying the list of contents for each kit type in a more condensed format. The Survival & Austere Medicine manual is a free resource with much good information. Please consult it for more detail.

Personal bag/blow out kit: Carry this with you at all times. It contains basic first aid gear or in a tactical situation the equipment to deal with injuries from a gunshot wound or explosion (figure 1). This includes things to immediately render aid – it’s almost like a pre-first aid, first aid kit!

A list might include:

Combat dressings/Israeli dressings

A hemostatic gauze compound

Chest seals – Asherman chest seals stick poorly on wet, hairy chests despite being relatively common place. Hyfin or Halo seals or even a rat glue trap works better. Studies have shown no advantage to vented dressing chest dressings vs. not vented.

Long IV cannula or specific pneumothorax decompression needle

Tourniquets x2

Oral and/or nasal airways

Figure 1 Blowout bag: Personal medical equipment for a tactical situation (dressings, HemCon bandages, Chest seals, oral and nasal airways, IV cannula and a tourniquet

 

First response bag: Carry this in your car; take it with you when you go camping, family trips to the river, etc. It contains more advanced first aid gear and some medical items than a basic level medical kit.

Large kit bag: This is your home/retreat/bugging out medical kit. It contains your medical kit as opposed to simple first aid supplies.

Storage area: In your home/retreat. It contains duplicate and bulk supplies. Large plastic storage bins are ideal for this.

Continue reading “First Aid and Medical Kit Contents”

Columbia Safety: Stop the Bleed Class, Mon. Feb. 5, 2018 7-9pm

Columbia Safety will be holding a Stop the Bleed class on Monday, February 5th, from 7pm-9pm. Tuition is only $10.

Stop the Bleed is intended to cultivate grassroots efforts that encourage bystanders to become trained, equipped, and empowered to help in a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives.
 
No matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the blood loss.
 
Those nearest to someone with life threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care. According to a recent National Academies of Science study, trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 46.
 
Remember to be aware of your surroundings and move yourself and the injured person to safety, if necessary.