John Mosby: Guerrilla Gardener

John Mosby of the Mountain Guerrilla blog has some thoughts up on getting your garden started – Guerrilla Gardener: Some Thoughts and Observations on Vegetable Food Production (Or, Gardening for Knuckle-Draggers).

One of the truisms of gardening is that “Your first year of gardening will result in abject failure.” There’s so much to learn, about the plants, about starting seeds, about your local soil conditions and what amendments are needed, about weather and climactic conditions, etc.

We had gardens when I was a kid. We successfully raised rocks, tomatoes, rocks, okra, rocks, and peas, as I recall. Of course, as any gardener will tell you, those are some of the simplest crops to raise in a kitchen garden. In fact, they’re so easy to grow, you could almost grow them without even planting them (especially the case with rocks…).

After leaving home for the Army, I had never had a garden. Hell, I’d never had a potted plant.

My wife had never, as far as I know, had a garden in her life.

So, when we decided to start raising most of our own food, to increase our sustainability, my first instinct was to raise small livestock: chickens, rabbits, etc. Of course, I’m a meat-eater, both literally and figuratively, so that makes sense. My wife on the other hand, likes her veggies, and we want the kids to eat well-balanced meals, so a garden, it was decided, was a necessity (And, to be clear, by “it was decided,” I mean, HH6 said, “We’re going to plant a garden this year!” and I responded with, “Roger that, boss!”)

So, as is my norm, when confronted with a new, unfamiliar—foreign—mission, I started doing my “Area Study” research. I dug out a couple dozen books on subsistence gardening, organic gardening, no-till gardening, and etc.

Let me set your mind at ease: there’s a metric …ton of material available out there on gardening, and it’s fair to say that any given reference book on the subject will contradict what every other available reference book will say.

In the end, between our research, and my wife and I bickering about differing visions for the farm’s production, here’s what we ended up trying…

Click here to read the entire article at the Mountain Guerrilla blog.

Fr. John Peck: Poll Finds Overwhelming Majority Want Restrictions on Abortion

From Fr. John Peck, New Poll Finds Overwhelming Majority of Americans Want Restrictions on Abortion.

A new national poll conducted by Marist University finds an overwhelming majority of Americans support restrictions on abortion and would like Roe v. Wade reinterpreted to allow restrictions on abortions.

Three in four Americans (75 percent) say abortion should be limited to – at most – the first three months of pregnancy. This includes most of those who identify as Republicans (92 percent), Independents (78 percent) and a majority of Democrats (60 percent). It also includes more than six in 10 (61 percent) who identify as “pro-choice” on abortion.

The strong support for restricting abortion came despite the fact that a majority of Americans identify as pro-choice (55 percent) — making it clear that the terms pro-choice and pro-life are not accurate in determining or representing the actual views of Americans on abortion.

The Marist Poll follows on the heels of the May 2019 Gallup poll which confirmed 53% of Americans oppose all or most abortions.

The poll also found that a strong majority of Americans disagree with the Roe v. Wade decision that gives states the ability to allow abortions up to birth without any limits…

Click here to read the entire article at Fr. John Peck’s website.

Doom and Bloom: Deadly Viruses, Part 3

Nurse Amy and Dr. Alton of Doom and Bloom Medicine have the third part of a series on Deadly Viruses up at the website. This installment goes into detail about influenza, the virus that kills around half a million people each year.

Spanish Flu ward

During a typical flu season, up to 500,000 people worldwide will die from the illness, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In the U.S., it’s usually about 30,000, mostly among the very elderly or immune-compromised. But occasionally, when a new strain emerges, a pandemic results with a faster spread of disease and, often, higher mortality rates. Last year, 80,000 U.S. residents failed to recover from the flu.

The deadliest flu pandemic, sometimes called the Spanish flu, began in 1918 and sickened up to 40 percent of the world’s population, killing an estimated 50-100 million people. Indeed, it was a factor in bringing about the end of World War I.

Could such a flu pandemic happen again? If a true long-term disaster scenario occurs, we’ll be thrown, medically, back to that era, so it’s possible. Despite this, many don’t take measures to prevent it.

Click here to read the entire article at Doom and Bloom.

Rally for Your Rights, Olympia, Jan. 18th, 2019

A rally in support of “the right of the individual citizen to bear arms” (WA state Constitution) will be held on the Capitol Campus Friday, January 18th. The rally will be held on the north steps of the Legislative Building and will begin at 9 a.m., ending at 12 noon. The rally is sponsored by the Gun Rights Coalition.

From The Olympian:

A gun rights rally next week on the Capitol Campus is expected to draw 150 people, including some with guns.

Rally for Your Rights will take place from 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 18 on the north steps of the Legislative Building. The event is organized by the Gun Rights Coalition and is permitted by the Department of Enterprise Services.

State law allows people to openly carry guns in most public areas, including on the Capitol Campus. Washington State Patrol will be at the scene that day.

 

WA GOAL Post 2019-1

From the Washington Gun Owners’ Action League:

GOAL Post2019-1

Legislative Update from Olympia 11 January 2019

RALLY IN OLY FRIDAY 18 JANUARY

LEGISLATURE CONVENES MONDAY, 14 JANUARY (105 DAY SESSION)

DEMOCRATS IN COMPLETE CONTROL

BILL INFORMATION

NEW GUN BILLS PRE-FILED

LEGISLATIVE TUTORIAL

LEGISLATIVE CALENDAR

NEXT WEEK’S HEARING SCHEDULE

LEGISLATOR CONTACT INFORMATION

HOW TO TESTIFY AT A PUBLIC HEARING

PUBLIC HEARING VERSUS EXECUTIVE SESSION

(This will be a long GOAL Post as I have to describe the environment and
the processes involved for new readers. Future issues will be
shorter. Also keep in mind that GOAL Post focuses on gun law only, we do
not cover hunting issues. The Hunters Heritage Council does that well.I
normally post GP on Friday evenings to summarize that week’s activities
and provide a forecast for the next. I’ll be on the road for the next two
weeks, so some issues might be late – or early.)

First business first: a gun rights rally will be held on the Capitol
Campus next Friday, January 18th. The rally will be held on the north
steps of the Legislative Building and will begin at 9 a.m., ending at 12
noon. The rally is sponsored by the Gun Rights Coalition. (Yes, it’s a
Friday, and unlike the people bussed in to attend many liberal rallies,
gunnies have to work. Are your gun rights worth a day off?) After the
formal presentation, attendees are encouraged to familiarize themselves
with the campus layout (the Capitol, or “legislative” building where
floor sessions are conducted, as well as the John L. O’Brien House
Office Building, the John A. Cherberg Senate Office Building, and the
Irv Newhouse Senate Office Building. This is a great opportunity to
locate your two representatives’ and one senator’s office and introduce
yourself to their legislative aides. Hopefully over the coming session
they’ll become familiar with your name and maybe even your face!

The legislature convenes on Monday, January 14th , for its “long” (105
day) session. This is the start of the 66^th biennium, which will run
through next year (2020). The primary focus of the long session is
supposed to be preparation and passage of a two-year budget, but worry
not – they’ll find plenty of time for gun control. If their work is not
completed, they can be called back by the governor for any number of
30-day special sessions, as happened two years ago with THREE
back-to-back special sessions.

I’m not going to point fingers, as it’s not clear who to point fingers
at:overly enthusiastic liberal voters or discouraged
conservatives. Either way, the Democrats now have solid control of BOTH
the Senate and the House. We still have a few friendly Democrats in the
Senate and the House, but not enough to overcome the liberal majority.

The new Senate has 28 Democrats, 21 Republicans.The House will have 57
Democrats to 41 Republicans. This means not only will every committee
chair be Democrat (the committee chair controls which bills will receive
a hearing), but most committees will have a two-seat Democrat majority.

In the first session of the biennium, all new bills must be filed.You
may see familiar subjects brought back, but the bill numbers will be
new.Bills stay alive for the entire two-year biennium.

Text of newly filed bills can be found at
https://app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/ Also on the bill information page are
links to “New Introductions” (daily), and at the bottom, “Bills by
topic” and “Bill Tracking.”

Pre-filing of bills for the new legislature begins in December, and
there are already a handful of gun-related bills in the hopper.

A complete list of bills under consideration is included below in the
“BILL STATUS” section.It also contains the bill’s prime sponsor, the
current status of the bill (committee location) and the GOAL position on
the bill. Committee abbreviations are provided at the bottom of that
section. As this is written there are currently 12 gun bills available
for consideration/action.

For those new to legislative affairs, here’s how the process works: When
a bill is filed in the House or Senate (or both, simultaneously, called
“companion bills”) it is assigned to a policy committee.Most gun-related
bills go to the Senate Law & Justice Committee in the Senate. In the
House it’s a little more complicated, as it may be sent to House Civil
Rights & Judiciary or House Public Safety (most will go to CR&J). Public
hearings may be held, after which the bill may (or may not) be voted out
of committee. If the bill has a fiscal impact (usually an expenditure of
more than $50,000), it must then go to Senate Ways & Means or one of a
couple of House fiscal committees. The bill then goes to the Senate or
House Rules Committee, where it must be voted on to pass out to the
floor for a full vote.

After a bill passes the Senate or House, it then goes over to the
opposite chamber (House or Senate), where the whole process starts over
again. If the bill passes the second chamber in the same form it passed
the first, it goes to the governor for signature (or veto or partial
veto). If changes are made in the second chamber, it goes back to the
first for concurrence. It may also go to a conference committee from both
chambers to resolve differences.The final version must pass both chambers.

The bill then goes to the Governor, who may sign it into law, veto
(kill) the bill, or sign a partial veto (killing just selected
section(s) of the bill). The governor may also allow a bill to become law
without his signature. Most signed bills take effect on 1 July, although
bills with an “emergency clause” (considered immediately necessary for
public safety) take effect upon signature by the governor.

One of the first items of business in each session is the adoption of
the session calendar, identifying dates by which bills must clear
various hurdles. A bill that fails to clear the policy committee or
chamber floor by the designated date is generally considered dead for
the year, although they may be “resurrected” by parliamentary
procedure. I’ll post the cut-off dates for the 2018 session in the next
issue of GOAL Post.

At this time, public hearings are scheduled for HB 1010 (disposal of
forfeited firearm) on Tuesday, January 15th , at 10 a.m. in the House
Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee, and for SBs 5072 (extreme risk
protection orders, under 18) and 5027 (extreme risk protection orders,
under 18) on Thursday, 17 January at 10 a.m. in the Senate Law & Justice
Committee.

The following links can be used to contact legislators .Lists won’t be
updated until new members are sworn in Monday):

http://www.leg.wa.gov/Senate/Senators/

http://www.leg.wa.gov/House/Representatives/

Legislative e-mail addresses are available at
http://app.leg.wa.gov/MemberEmail/Default.aspx

The link contains a quick tutorial on providing testimony at public
hearings on bills under consideration. I would urge you to read it and
consider visiting Olympia to let YOUR voice be
heard.http://leg.wa.gov/legislature/Pages/Testify.aspx

Public hearings are committee meetings open to the public, where the
public is allowed to testify on bills, to give their views on the
bill. But all votes on bills taken by a committee are conducted in what
are called “executive sessions.” They are typically part of a public
session, with a few minutes set aside to vote on bills previously heard
by the committee. Public testimony is just that, open to the public for
comment.On the other hand, no public input is allowed during executive
session. You are welcome to sit there, and to count votes, but silence
from the public is the rule.Just FYI for those of you who have not
attended legislative public meetings before.

And you won’t find the House Judiciary Committee listed any more. It’s
now the House Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee.

The Senate Committee Services office has done us the favor of compiling
a 26 page summary of Washington state firearms laws and other data
surrounding firearms… with – at first glance – a typical Olympia slant
on it.The “study” us available at
http://leg.wa.gov/Senate/Committees/LAW/Documents/Washington%20Firearms%20Laws.pdf

BILL STATUS/GOAL POSITION:

HB 1010 Disposition of forfeited firearms by WSP Senn (D-41 )H.CR&J OPPOSE

HB 1022 Prohibiting handgun sale data base Walsh (R-19) H.CR&JSUPPORT

HB 1024 Prohibiting gun owner data base Walsh (R-19) H.CR&J SUPPORT

HB 1068 High capacity magazine ban Valdez (D-46 )H.CR&J OPPOSE

HB 1038 Authorizing armed school personnel Walsh (R-19) UnAsg SUPPORT

HB 1073 Undetectable and/or untraceable firearms Valdez (D-46) H.CR&J OPPOSE

SB 5016 Authorizing armed animal control officers Van De Wege UnAsg SUPPORT

SB 5027 Extreme risk protection orders, under age 18 Frockt (D-46) S.L&J OPPOSE

SB 5050 Sentence enhancement for body armor use in a
crime O’Ban (R-28) S.L&J NEUTRAL

SB 5061 Undetectable and untraceable firearms Dhingra (D-45) S.L&J OPPOSE

SB 5062 High capacity magazine ban Kuderer (D-48) S.L&J OPPOSE

SB 5072 Extreme risk protection orders O’Ban (R-28) S.L&J NEUTRAL

HB = House bill, SB = Senate bill. L&J = Law & Justice, CR&J = Civil
Rights and Judiciary, PubSaf = Public Safety, HC = Health Care, H. K-12
= House Early education, Aprop = Appropriations, Fin = Finance, W&M =
Ways & Means“S” before a bill number indicates Substitute (amended).

HEARINGS SCHEDULED:

15 Jan House Civil Rights and Jud Committee, John L. O’Brien Building

10:00 HB 1010

17 Jan Senate Law & Justice Committee, John A. Cherberg Bldg

10:00 SBs 5027 and 5072

LEGISLATIVE HOT LINE: You may reach your Representatives and Senator by
calling the Legislative Hotline at 1-800-562-6000. Toll free!!! The
hearing impaired may obtain TDD access at 1-800-635-9993. Also toll free!!!

1-800-562-6000TDD 1-800-635-9993

OTHER DATA:Copies of pending legislation (bills), legislative schedules
and other information are available on the legislature’s web site at
www.leg.wa.gov“. Bills are available in Acrobat (.pdf) format. You may
download a free version of Adobe Acrobat Reader from Adobe’s web site
(http://www.adobe.com). You may also obtain hard copy bills, initiatives,
etc, in the mail from the Legislative Bill Room FREE OF CHARGE by
calling 1-360-786-7573. Copies of bills may also be ordered toll free by
calling the Legislative Hotline at (800) 562-6000. You may also hear
floor and committee hearing action live at http://www.tvw.org/ (you need
“RealAudio” to do this, available free at the TVW web site).

By reading the House and Senate “bill reports” (hbr, sbr) for each bill,
you can see how individual committee members voted. By reading the “roll
call” for each bill, you can see how the entire House or Senate voted on
any bill. The beauty of the web site is that ALL this information is
available, on line 24/7 , to any citizen.

GET THE WORD OUT:If you want to subscribe to the GOAL Post by e-mail,
send a message to “goalwa@cox.net “.Please pass GOAL Post on to anyone
you believe may have an interest in protecting our rights.Better yet,
make a couple of copies of this message, post it on your gun club’s
bulletin board, and leave copies with your local gun shop(s).PERMISSION
IS HEREBY GRANTED TO DUPLICATE OR REDISTRIBUTE GOAL POST PROVIDED IT IS
REPRODUCED WITHOUT TEXTUAL MODIFICATION AND CREDIT IS GIVEN TO GOAL

“The right of the individual citizen to bear arms in defense of himself, or the state, shall not be impaired, but nothing in this section shall be construed as authorizing individuals or corporations to organize, maintain or employ an armed body of men.”

Article 1, Section 24

Constitution of the State of Washington

PNNL Lecture: Redox Flow Batteries for Energy Storage, Jan 15, 2019

The Richland Public Library is hosting a PNNL lecture on Tuesday, January 15th at 7:00 PM on Redox Flow Batteries (RFBs) for Large-Scale Energy Storage. Some battery manufacturers are starting to make RFBs available for home solar storage, so this may be an up and coming technology, though issues may still be being worked out. Manufacturers call them the safest and cleanest energy storage solution, and that the risk of battery fire is eliminated. RFB lifespan is also suggested to be longer with more than 10,000 power cycles with no degradation.

PNNL develops large scale RFBs for utility-level storage, like the 8 Megawatt-hour battery installed at a Snohomish PUD substation back in 2017.

PNNL Lecture – Redox Flow Batteries as Candidates for Large-Scale Energy Storage

Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are prominent candidates for large-scale energy storage because they offer high safety, decoupling of power and energy, long life span, quick response, and potentially low cost. This talk will introduce this unique energy storage technology to the Tri-Cities community, and provide an overview on its working mechanism, development history, major components, and the various chemistries used.
The talk will also cover new redox flow technologies developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Presented by Dr. Wei Wang, Chief Scientist, Energy Processes and Materials Division

 

AmPart: Wargaming Dangers to Your Area

NC Scout is full of useful information, and luckily he is willing to share that information with us all. In his post Situational Awareness and Wargaming Your AO, NC Scout gives us a short explanation about how to about thinking over how critical infrastructure in your area could be attacked. He’s particular interested in communication infrastructure, but the same targeting process can be used toward anything.

The most important questions you should be asking right now are not the hypothetical or abstract simply naming ‘SHTF!’, rather, it needs to be rationally rooted in the MOST LIKELY and MOST DEADLY courses of action (MLCOA / MDCOA). What causes this “SHTF?” Who will be taking advantage of it? One of the overtones of my recent classes has been discussing the growing local antifa movement and (somewhat) wargaming/red celling capabilities, with emergency services communications systems coming into question. Think on that one for a second. It’s a dangerous proposition that many overlook- there’s a real threat to the robustness of emergency service equipment and as we become more and more complex, they become more and more vulnerable. From my perspective, this makes understanding and maintaining my own off-grid communications and action networks that much more important. And it should you too…

This is not some overseas and out of mind terror group. This is Antifa in the US. And they’ve built a cadre of combat vets from their time fighting in Rojava. What have you been doing?

.Building independent, self-sustaining communities is paramount, as well as being the strongest survivalist plan, but its important to recognize that threats are more than just simplistic catch phrases. You still live in the real world, not that lustful libertariatopia, and are subject to the ramifications of threats external to you. I take people at their word- and the Left’s core, the ‘instant gratification‘ groomed social justice warriors, a manifestation of all of the fingers that threaten Western Sovereignty- are the future of their movement. They see no benefit to the current order and through willful ignorance find solace amid revolutionary ideals whose only logical end is violence. I believe them. And instead of useless projecting, you should be asking serious questions about what they’re capable of pulling off. I bet some folks in Nigeria today wished they had done a bit more in retrospect. I’d be willing to bet some of you will too- Antifa thugs, Islamic thugs, same types of people. They both want you, Christian Male, exterminated.

What to do now is get serious about a training schedule while spending some time understanding more about your individual area. There’s a lot of opportunities out there, and the more arrows you put in the quiver the more resilient you’ll be later on down the road.

Read the entire article at American Partisan by clicking here.

Sultan Knish: Portland is Killing Itself

Daniel Greenfield at Sultan Knish blog has an article up describing how Portland’s progressive policies are destroying a once beautiful city – Escape from Portland. I used to love a trip to Portland — visit awesome bookstore Powell’s, visit one of the many good restaurants like Ox or maybe some of their nice food trucks — but it hasn’t been the same the last few years.

Officials say that although their “no-turn-away shelter strategy” failed spectacularly, they want it to be adopted state-wide and nationally.

It was a big year in Portland where the murder rate rose 18.6%. That was the perfect time for Portland’s progressive politburo to spend over $1 million on unarmed cops armed only with pepper spray.

There was a little bit of excitement when it was learned that their 200 hours of training would include “Taser Orientation” suggesting that they might be allowed to carry tasers. But Mayor Wheeler’s office explained that the weaponless cops weren’t being trained to use tasers, but “how to avoid being tased”…

Homeless crime has become both routine and terrifying. One Portlander described being threatened with a machete on a children’s playground, and it’s taken the city’s crime problem to new levels.

15% of Portland’s violent deaths in 2018 involved the homeless in some way.

Portland property crimes rose 15% in 2017. Its property crime rates easily outpace Boston and Denver, and put it on a par with dangerous cities like Atlanta. Its homeless blight has put Portland on the same path as San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles. Portland’s Downtown Clean and Safe had picked up less than 9,897 used needles in 2015. This year it’s 39,000. Garbage and biohazards have also increased.

Car thefts are up 45% in two years. In Mayor Wheeler’s State of the City address this year, he mentioned a “97 percent increase in stolen vehicle calls” in 5 years. There was also a “64 percent increase in unwanted persons calls and a 32 percent increase in disorder calls”…

Click here to read the entire article at Sultan Knish.

Yakima Herald: Trained Volunteers May Be the First to Reach Victims

The Yakima Herald had an article on CERT volunteers and training last year – In an emergency, trained volunteers may be the first to reach victims. Yakima County has an active CERT program. Benton County does not. If you live in Yakima County, you can take advantage of the training from CERT. They do a “CERT Basic Course” for volunteers which includes:

Disaster Preparedness: Addresses hazards specific to the community. Materials cover actions that participants and their families take before, during and after a disaster as well as an overview of CERT and local laws governing volunteers.

Fire Suppression: Covers fire chemistry, hazardous materials, fire hazards and fire suppression strategies. However, the thrust of this session is the safe use of fire extinguishers, controlling utilities and extinguishing a small fire.

Medical Operations Part I: Participants practice diagnosing and treating airway obstruction, bleeding and shock by using simple triage and rapid treatment techniques.

Medical Operations Part II: Covers evaluating patients by doing a head to toe assessment, establishing a medical treatment area and performing basic first aid.

Light Search and Rescue Operations: Participants learn about search and rescue planning, size-up, search techniques, rescue techniques and rescuer safety.

Psychology and Team Organization: Covers signs and symptoms that might be experienced by the disaster victim and workers, and addresses CERT organization and management.

Course Review and Disaster Simulation: Participants review and practice the skills that they have learned during the previous six sessions in a disaster activity.

Excerpt from the Yakima Herald article:

If an earthquake, volcanic eruption, wildfire or flood hits the Yakima Valley, you might not see firefighters or paramedics in your neighborhood for a while.

The experience in other disasters has shown that professional first responders can be overwhelmed as they deal with urgent needs, or they might not be able to get to where people need help because roads and bridges are out.

Instead, help for your neighborhood may come from people in green vests and hard hats like Paul Jenkins, a volunteer coordinator with the county’s Community Emergency Response Team

The team has quarterly training exercises and participates in events such as a recent drill at the Yakima Air Terminal, as well as activations of the county’s emergency operations center in Union Gap.

While some people may think that firefighters, police and paramedics will be on the scene right away when a disaster strikes, Jenkins said they could easily be swamped with calls for help in an emergency, or the nature of the disaster might cut off access for a time.

Jenkins has been called out for flooding in West Valley, wildfire near Moxee and the Miriam Fire, where he helped distribute literature and provide security at the site. He was also sent to Outlook to help get information and bottled water to residents after an overflowing manure pond contaminated local wells.

While there are 60 people currently trained, Ward and Jenkins would like to see more people get involved, as it will give them skills to cope in a disaster…

John Mosby: Seeking Sustainability in Preparedness

John Mosby has a nice article up at Mountain Guerrilla about Seeking Sustainability in Preparedness, expounding upon the importance of not having just a store of stuff built up but being able to survive and thrive without such a stockpile on your own skills and sustainable living habits. Getting to a self-reliant, sustainable lifestyle is difficult and takes time and trial and error. Patrice Lewis will be talking about some of that in her two talks at this year’s NW Preparedness Expo. Mosby talks about it frequently on his blog. This article is not short, but, as usual with Mr. Mosby, it is well worth the read.

…One of the recurring themes in preparedness circles is the argument over the nature of any impending disaster. One of the original theories in preparedness of course, is the idea of what was once referred to as a multi-generational collapse. This is a collapse of such magnitude that it will take multiple generations to recover from, if in fact, recovery is even possible.

In recent years, of course, while people still talk about the “remote possibility” of this, it has become equally popular, in many circles, to dismiss the idea of a multigenerational collapse as unrealistic, and urge people to focus on more immediate, “realistic” disasters of short-duration, like hurricanes, tornadoes, and wildfires.

Without arguing the fact that wildfire, tornado, or earthquake is a far more immediate, and pressing concern for most folks, I WOULD point out that these are pretty simple to mitigate, and there is a well-developed set of basic planning considerations for doing so in all of these, because people have dealt with them for the entire existence of humankind…

We need to develop mitigation plans that address the continuance of life, through the duration of the emergency, even if it stops being an emergency, and just becomes “life.” (Which, long time readers know is my view of where we are any-fucking-way.)

We need to be looking at food production. We need to be looking at producing light and heat. We need to be looking at long-term trauma and chronic illness medical care. We need to be looking at educating our children and grandchildren, so they don’t revert to full-scale savagery. We need to look at maintaining—or more accurately, recreating, culture.

We need to stop looking at “survival,” and start looking at “Sustainability.”…

Click here to read the entire article at Mountain Guerrilla.

MountainGuerrilla: Auxilliary Functions within Tribal Structure

This is an old post from John Mosby at the MountainGuerrilla blog. In Auxiliary Functions within the Tribal Structure, John lays out some of the important functions that can and should be performed by those members of your close-knit group who are too old, too young, or too infirm to help with more strenuous activities in the context of a resistance movement, should such fate ever befall you.

…By fulfilling those roles that the auxiliary has historically fulfilled in a resistance, that do not require the fitness or physical capabilities of the guerrilla force or underground, members of a tribe can still contribute worthwhile efforts to the security of their tribe, thus “earning their keep.”

An individual’s specific contribution to the efforts has—and will—depend largely on their socio-economic status, roles, and their occupation…a farmer or homesteader may “only” provide assistance by providing extra harvest to feed the guerrilla force or underground, or to sell on the local black or gray market, in order to help finance tribal operations. On the other hand, the farmer may end up providing barn space for a way-station on an evasion corridor, or for use as a guerrilla hospital.

Regardless of the specific role the auxiliary tribesman plays in the effort, it is critical to understand that the success of their efforts depends on their participation in such operations remains clandestine. The secret must not be kept only from rival organizations, but even from apparently friendly or supportive neighbors who do not enjoy the trust of being part of the closed circle—innangard—that is the tribe. Even other members of the tribe, outside the leadership, may not know exactly what the auxiliary offers the tribe. Keeping this information compartmentalized, even within the innangard, can reduce the chances that someone will inadvertently reveal it to someone that does not “need to know.”

Auxiliary Tasks

While there is really no task that the auxiliary might be able to perform, to support the tribe’s efforts, there are a number of roles the auxiliary has traditionally played that still offer a significant role for members of your tribe to contribute to your efforts of autonomy.

Security and Warning

One of the best efforts your auxiliary tribesmen can offer is the same that the elderly and young children, not ready to be warriors yet, have always provided a tribe. They can act as a physical security and warning system for the tribe. From simply standing watch during training exercises and meetings, to organizing and directing sympathizers into networks to observe, record, and report on the activities of other organizations—rival or not—in the area…

Click here to read the entire article at the Mountain Guerrilla blog.

Prep School Daily: Herbal Medicine – Honey

Another informative article from Jennifer is up at her Prep School Daily blog on the many benefits of honey.

…A simple online search for the medicinal uses of honey yields dozens of hits, if not hundreds, including all the health benefits of honey.  It’s touted for helping with all manner of problems, from acne to weight loss.  We’ll stick with what honey is most especially used for in a true medicinal sense when our society has collapsed.  After all, our honey supply may be limited and taking a teaspoon every day for allergies or in the evening to sleep better will exhaust our stores quickly.

First off, studies have shown that honey is more effective at quieting a cough in children than any over-the-counter cough syrup. Parents also reported that their children slept better.  (However, honey should never, under any circumstance, be given to a child under 12 months of age.)  In addition, it should be noted that the FDA has recommended removing many children’s OTC cough syrups from the shelves because of adverse reactions.  Fortunately, we have honey, which is safer, more effective, and cheaper.  Just a teaspoon or two is all that is needed.  And it works for adults as well.  Also, honey tea does a tremendous job soothing sore throats.  Just remember, when making your tea, boil the water first, remove from heat, and then add the honey.  Boiling the honey itself will reduce or entirely negate many of its medicinal qualities.

Dr. Joseph Alton, author of The Survival Medicine Handbook, notes that honey was used to treat asthma in 19th century.  Patients were directed to breathe deeply from a jar of honey, and improvement usually occurred within a few minutes.  To decrease the number of future episodes, doctors advised drinking one teaspoon of honey in twelve ounces of water three times per day.

As far as healing wounds goes, honey works in much the same manner as sugar, which was discussed last week.  Wounds, especially chronic wounds that aren’t healing, have an alkaline pH, which provides an ideal breeding ground for bacteria, especially MRSA.  Honey (and sugar) are acidic, so they alter the pH and this kills the bacteria.  Honey may be spread directly on a wound and over the surrounding edges, but it will probably be more comfortable for the patient if the honey is spread on some gauze first and then applied to the wound…

Click here to read the entire article at Prep School Daily.

AmPart: Gear for Operating in Cold Weather

Baby, it’s cold outside. But cold and wet or cold and dry, you’ve got to away or at least outside and get some stuff done. JC Dodge at American Partisan discusses options, mostly from military surplus, that can keep your both warm and functional while you are out in the cold – Basic Strategies and Gear for Operating in Cold Weather.

The recent extreme cold weather has made survivalists all over the US realize that whether they’re in a “warm weather” state or not, having the gear and “know how” to operate in extreme cold weather is a necessary reality. I laughed when I got an alert that Tallahassee, FL had 21 deg. Fahrenheit (all temps listed in this port are Fahrenheit) and snow the other day. Why did I laugh? I laughed because I knew a guy in that area years ago who told me he didn’t have to worry about cold weather gear in the area he lived, as they never got real cold weather.

Cold weather has a number of categories that have to be addressed withing their own niche. I usually just go through them as such: “Cold/No Precip,” “Extreme Cold/No Precip,” “Cold/Wet,” “Extreme Cold/Wet.”

Staying warm starts with understanding what takes the warmth away when you are in any of the above environments. This starts with doing what you can to stay dry. Not sweating or staying out of the precipitation is your best bet to accomplishing that. Barring the ability to stay dry, having an out layer that is windproof, relatively waterproof and breathable (and with the ability to vent as much heat as possible) is your best bet. This is used in conjunction with under layers of clothing that either wicks away the moisture (like polypro and fleece) or retains its insulative qualities when wet (like wool)…

Click here to read the entire article at American Partisan.

Doom and Bloom: Deadly Viruses, Part 2

Nurse Amy and Dr. Alton of Doom and Bloom Medicine have the second part of a series on Deadly Viruses up at the website. This installment gives a brief overview of several more viruses.

Infectious disease is of major concern in good times or bad, and the family medic must be able to identify some of the deadliest. Having just written a book about infectious diseases and the antibiotics that treat them (Alton’s Antibiotics and Infectious Disease: The Layman’s Guide to Available Antibacterials in Austere Settings), we’ve done our research on some of the worst illnesses that can occur even in countries with advanced medical systems.

There are infections out there, however, that are often fatal and can’t be treated with antibiotics. These are usually viral in nature. Last time, we talked about HIV, hemorrhagic fevers like Ebola and its relatives, plus the rodent-borne Hantavirus.

In this part of our series on deadly viruses, we’ll go over a few well-known diseases, but also cover some that you may not have heard about.

ROTAVIRUS

Dehydration from intestinal viruses is a major killer in less-developed countries

The World Health Organization reports that this virus kills more than half a million children annually worldwide. They even believe that every child on the planet has been infected at least once with it. You get it by ingesting bad food and water or touching surfaces contaminated with infected feces…

Click here to read the entire article at Doom and Bloom.

And if you missed it, click here for Part 1.

AmPart: How to Motivate Your Group Volunteers

Kit Perez has a good article up at American PartisanHow to Motivate Your Group Volunteers. It doesn’t matter if your group is a prepper group, a church group, a hobby club, or any other group of volunteers, you’ve probably heard “You can’t expect volunteers to…” or “We don’t want to lose anyone…” as an excuse for not getting something done. Kit addresses these issues and more.

We’ve all been there, in a group where 2-3 people are motivated, working, and “all in,” only to find themselves carrying the rest of the members. It’s one reason why you’ll also hear some folks brag about “not playing well with others” or telling you how they plan to “go it alone.” Fancying themselves some kind of lone wolf in an overly romaticized notino of what a SHTF event actually looks like, they plan to be a cross between Rambo and Tom Hanks in Cast Away. All they need is a volleyball to name Wilson.

The cold, hard reality is that you cannot survive a SHTF event — whether it be a natural disaster, a man-made one, or some other kind of societal meltdown — without help from others. Neighbors, group members, whatever. Which brings us to the obvious problem: What do you do with slackers in your group? How can you motivate them?

The Volunteer Mentality

Part of what you’re up against is the volunteer mentality. In essence, it consists of people saying things like, “well, we’re volunteers. You can’t expect us to ___________ when we aren’t getting paid.” You may also hear people whispering in your ear that because people are volunteers, if you push them too hard they will leave. “We need bodies,” they’ll say. A body, any body, is better than no bodies…or so the conventional wisdom goes.

There are a few problems with that mindset, however, and here are a few concepts I personally hold to when looking at group members for myself, or helping other groups in a consulting capacity…

Every single member of your group should have a task and a purpose. If they don’t, they are merely takers…

Click here to read the entire article at American Partisan.