Brushbeater: A Few Notes on the Current ‘Happenings’

From NC Scout over at the Brushbeater blog comes his musings on current happenings, the non-event of the coincidentally timed annual MARS-ARES interoperability radio exercise, doom-sayers, North Korea, and instability in our own government. Here is an excerpt from A Few Notes on the Current ‘Happenings.’

Wild times we’re living in. And a lot of uncertainty coupled with real reasons to prepare. A big part of that is being well informed. There’s good stuff out there and a lot of well meaning people, and then again there’s a lot of throwback fear mongers and blatant disinformation that people should really know better than to pay attention to. Don’t believe most of what you read and only about half of what you see. Pretty good rule, right? One of the reasons I started this blog, all the way back to the beginning, was to point out some simple codified ways for Right-leaning folks to a) collect & verify information and b) share it sans-grid. In fact one of the first things I wrote was how to do so for Sparks31’s old blog [a re-run of that post can be found here] So naturally, as its gained attention over the past couple of years, things come across my desk that inspired the whole reason for me to begin writing in the first place…

Click here to read the entire post.

Related:

Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class

Full Spectrum Training

Forward Observer

Why Small Team Tactics

Is This What You Call Being Prepared?

The Prepared Homestead: Herbal Jello

From Monica and Sean over at The Prepared Homestead comes a recipe for a healthier gelatin snack.

If you attended my last herbal class you got a chance to taste some herbal jello. Honestly I am not one of those people that is a purist in anything. I believe moderation in all things, even in diet. Which is why, though I don’t normally serve boxed jello to my kids, I don’t mind giving it to them once in a while to get my littlest one to take a particularly pungent, bitter, or sour herbal preparation. However, I decided to do a little experimenting in my kitchen today and think I’ve come up with an easy way to make an herbal jello that is a little healthier – no dyes, no processed sugar, healthy collagen, & nothing but goodness…

Click here to continue reading.

Shakeout! Oct. 19, 2017

Millions of people worldwide will practice how to
Drop, Cover, and Hold On at 10:19 a.m. on October 19* during Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills!

Washingtonians can join them today by registering for the 2017 Great Washington ShakeOut. Participating is a great way for your family or organization to be prepared to survive and recover quickly from big earthquakes– wherever you live, work, or travel. Learn tips on how to get 2 Weeks Ready and craft your own emergency kits here. ShakeOut is also a major activity of America’s PrepareAthon!

Start here to be included in the 2017 Washington ShakeOut!

The Pacific Coast of Washington is at risk from tsunamis. These destructive waves can be caused by coastal or submarine landslides or volcanism, but they are most commonly caused by large submarine earthquakes.

Tsunamis are generated when these geologic events cause large, rapid movements in the sea floor that displace the water column above. That swift change creates a series of high-energy waves that radiate outward like pond ripples. Offshore tsunamis would strike the adjacent shorelines within minutes and also cross the ocean at speeds as great as 600 miles per hour to strike distant shores. In 1946, a tsunami was initiated by an earthquake in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska; in less than 5 hours, it reached Hawaii with waves as high as 55 feet and killed 173 people.

Tsunami waves can continue for hours. The first wave can be followed by others a few minutes or a few hours later, and the later waves are commonly larger. Washington Emergency Management Tsunami Program

The earthquake threat in Washington is not uniform. While most earthquakes occur in Western Washington, some damaging events, such as the 1872 magnitude 6.8 (est.) quake, do occur east of the Cascades. Geologic evidence documents prehistoric magnitude 8 to 9.5 earthquakes along the outer coast, and events of magnitude 7 or greater along shallow crustal faults in the urban areas of Puget Sound.

Washington’s earthquake hazards reflect its tectonic setting. The Pacific Northwest is at a convergent continental margin, the collision boundary between two tectonic plates of the earth’s crust. The Cascadia subduction zone, the fault boundary between the North America plate and the Juan de Fuca plate, lies offshore from northern California to southern British Columbia. The two plates are converging at a rate of about 2 inches per year. In addition, the northward-moving Pacific plate is pushing the Juan de Fuca plate north, causing complex seismic strain to accumulate. The abrupt release of this slowly accumulated strain causes earthquakes.
Earthquakes at Washington Military Department Emergency Management Division.

In Washington, earthquakes and landslides are the most likely sources of a tsunami.

The Pacific Rim countries have a history of damaging tsunamis caused by both distant and local earthquakes. Earthquakes have caused 98% of the world’s tsunamis with over 73% of these being observed along the Pacific “Ring of Fire”. For this reason, communities in low-lying coastal areas around the Pacific Rim are among the most at risk to tsunami damages generated from both local and distant sources that can strike within minutes to many hours.

Washington State Earthquake Scenario Catalog (Washington State Department of Natural Resources)

DNR Interactive Geology Portal (Washington State Department of Natural Resources)

The Seattle Fault – Beneath Largest City in the Pacific Northwest (2 minute Geology, from HUGEfloods.com Youtube Channel)

Tsunami inundation maps (Washington State Department of Natural Resources)

Tsunami Evacuation Zones (Washington State Department of Natural Resources)

Recent Earthquakes Map (Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)

Earthquakes in Washington (United States Geological Survey)

Tax Reform Roundtable, Prosser, Oct. 18, 2017

Congressman Dan Newhouse will be holding a tax reform roundtable meeting in Prosser on October 18, 2017 from 10:00 am – 11:00 am at the Walter Clore Wine & Culinary Center, 2140 Wine Country Road, Prosser, WA 99350.  With tax reform on the horizon, he believes it is important to hear from community leaders and local elected officials about how the tax code affects families and businesses in the 4th Congressional District.  RSVP is needed. Please see the attached PDF file for RSVP information.

Click here for Tax Reform Roundtable pdf file

Puerto Rico Disaster Reports, Oct. 16, 2017

Puerto Rico continues to struggle following the recent hurricanes.

Here is a link, to an ARRL report on ham radio operators sent down to assist with communications. Note the references to generator fires, generator failures, hospital evacuations, and shortages of food, fuel and water.

This week, the team relayed a request for Culebra Hospital, which reported that a generator fire had forced relocation to a nearby clinic. In addition, volunteers relayed a request from Culebra Hospital that it needs temporary housing from FEMA for necessary staff members who lost their homes in the hurricane. The team also relayed a message for Hima San Pablo Hospital in Fajardo, which needed specialized IV fluids for a 4-day-old infant.

Rob Landon, KE8AMC, stationed at the hospital on Vieques, learned from the hospital administrator that they needed to evacuate dialysis patients, who require air conditioning that the hospital is unable to provide. “We made their day,” said Hotzfeld. “They were not aware of our presence and were impressed with our communications capabilities.”

Val Hotzfeld, NV9L (left), and ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager Mike Corey, KI1U.

An Amateur Radio operator has been assigned at Centro Medico (Medical Central) to provide communication between the center and other hospitals. “This happened just in time, because the Menonita (Mennonite) Hospital in Caguas had both generators fail,” Hotzfeld said. The emergency room doctor at Medical Central and the ham embedded there, Juan Trujillo, N0PSF, coordinated with Dennis Perez, WP4Q, at the Mennonite Hospital in Caguas to transfer four critical patients to the Mennonite Hospital in Cayey.

Volunteers at the EOC relayed a request from Guayana Hospital for snacks, water, and a generator. Their second generator was reported to be about to fail. They also relayed requests from hospitals for fuel and water, and they provided communication for fire departments contacting the EOC.

Brushbeater blog posted a short Reflections on Puerto Rico, discussing communications preparations in light of lessons from Puerto Rico.

So upon reading this, a serious skill assessment should be in order. If you’re the communicator in your group:

  • Can you rig your own wire antennas?
  • Do you have the rough calculations to make them resonant?
  • Do you have the current consumption of your various radios written down and a way to monitor it?
  • How long can you operate battery-only?
  • Do you have enough spare equipment to keep your station up if Murphy happens?
  • Do you have a working knowledge of different propagation modes (such as why NVIS does what it does)

But most important- how many people can also do what you do in your group?

Four deaths and ten suspected of infection are being investigated as possible cases of leptospirosis, a disease spread by animal urine, possibly from drinking contaminated stream water.

Meanwhile some desperate Puerto Ricans are reported to be drinking possibly toxic water from superfund cleanup sites. 34% of Puerto Ricans are still without access to fresh drinking water.

Rotting garbage may be the next health crisis there.

Three weeks after Hurricane Maria ransacked this island leaving at least 44 dead, Jose Vargas surveyed street after street lined with mounds of soaking garbage mixed with mud, trees and sometimes dead animals.

You couldn’t make a better breeding ground for rats, roaches and all sorts of nasty diseases, the public health volunteer said. And every day the fetid piles stay there, the risk of an epidemic grows.

“We’re already building the next disaster,” he warned.

Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class, Sat. Nov. 25th, 2017

Trigger Control Training will be holding an Emergency/Tactical First Aid Class for us on Saturday, November 25th, 2017 from 8am – 5pm in Richland at the M Hotel and Conference Center.  The cost of the class is $200 per person. Please click the registration link to see more details and waiver needs. These skills can be live saving in the event of automobile accidents, hunting accidents, mass casualty situations, violent criminal activity, and more. Twenty per cent of people who have died from traumatic injuries could have been saved with quick bleeding control. Please seriously consider adding these first aid skills to your repertoire.

“One of the most important lessons learned in the last 14 years of war is that using tourniquets and hemostatic dressings as soon as possible after injury is absolutely lifesaving,” Joint Committee to Develop a National Policy to Increase Survival from Active Shooter and Intentional Mass Casualty Events report.

Click here to register.

Description

Tactical self-aid and buddy-aid (first aid) training is for all non-medical operators and private citizens who seek additional first aid knowledge and skills to provide lifesaving measures for themselves, friends, family, or LEO partners. This class is designed to introduce the ability to provide the greatest amount of quality medical care when seconds count and immediate medical care is required.

We might not all be secret squirrels, law enforcement officers, or raiding enemy compounds; but accidents with life threatening injuries with dynamic medical intervention can mitigate the loss of life, limb, or quality of life. As a trained medical responder, you will be confident in your ability to save the life of another by providing care and preparing casualties for transportation to the hospital.

The course consists of 8 hours of both didactic and hands on training. Topics covered will be based upon Tactical Combat Casualty Care protocols with a pragmatic approach to situational and hands on learning. Students will demonstrate the ability to control and treat massive arterial bleeding, gunshot wounds, blast injuries, and other soft tissue injuries in a hostile or remote location. Students will be evaluated during 2 scenario based practical exercises.

After successful completion of the course, Students will receive a certificate of completion. The maximum class size for this course is 20 students. All expendable medical supplies for training will be provided, but the implementation of your own medical bags and equipment is encouraged. This class is designed to teach you how to implement materials and medical resources that you already have without attempting to market and sell expensive and impractical emergency medical equipment. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Class Schedule:

0800-0900 Hemorrhage Control and Combat Mindset
0910-1000 Penetrating Injuries and Hemostatic Agents
1010-1100 Hemorrhage Control Drills
1110-1200 Bleeding Control Scenario Exercise
1200-1300 Lunch Break
1300-1400 Airway and Breathing Management
1410-1500 Treating and preventing shock/ Environmental Considerations
1510-1600 Tactical Trauma Scenario

Saturday November 25, 2017
8:00am to 5:00pm

M Hotel and Confernce Center
Richland, WA

Shahram Hadian Speaks in Richland, WA Oct. 25th and 26th, 2017

The Benton-Franklin Committee of Safety will be hosting pastor Shahram Hadian of the Truth In Love Project Ministry on Wed. Oct 25th and Thurs. Oct 26th. Both events run from 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm at the Island View Worship Center at 1520 Fowler St., Richland, WA. The Wednesday talk will be on “Trojan Horse of Interfaith Dialogue” and the Thursday topic is “Need for a Courageous Generation & Civic Engagement.”

Stand Down and Veterans Benefits Fair, Oct 21, 2017

2017 Yakima Veteran Standdown Date:  Saturday, 21 October 2017 (9-3)
Location:  State Fair Park, Modern Living Bldg
1201 S. Fair Avenue, Yakima. WA 98901

For more information, donations or to volunteer contact:  Dave Brown 509-574-1528

Our Annual Stand Down and Veterans Benefit fair is an awesome opportunity for all Veterans to attend.  We have over 70 organizations providing information and services to our Veterans and their family.

Our event has something for everyone.  It is an opportunity for our Veterans and community to come together to recognize and serve our Veterans.

Multiple free services for Veterans:  Click on Stand Down Flyer below.

Click here for Yakima Valley Veterans’ Coalition Facebook page

Click here to download pdf Stand Down flyer

National Preparedness Month, Week 5, 2017

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

Get involved with your community with groups like the Lower Valley Assembly, CERT teams, Map Your Neighborhood groups or other preparedness groups in your area. Most counties will have an emergency management coordinator who can be contacted for CERT or Map Your Neighborhood (MYN) information. If you can’t find information in your county, you can contact your state emergency management department. In Washington state, that is the Emergency Management Division and you can contact their public education staff for direction to local MYN or CERT resources at at (253) 512-7419 or email public.education@mil.wa.gov. They’ll even help out of staters with MYN material.

Related:

How Churches Can Prepare for Disasters

Red Cross: Community Preparedness

Oath Keepers: Community Preparedness Teams

KrisAnne Hall Speaks in Idaho, Oct. 16-18th, 2017

Constitutional Attorney, Author, Speaker, and Radio Host KrisAnne Hall will have three speaking engagements in Idaho in October, 2017. KrisAnne Hall is an attorney and former prosecutor who travels the country teaching the Constitution and the history that gave us our founding documents. KrisAnne will connect the dots for you like no one else can! Details of the talks still to come.

Sandpoint, ID – Oct. 16th. 6:00pmArticle V & Nullification, Sandpoint Community Hall

Bonners Ferry, ID – Oct. 17th 6:00pm4th Amendment, Providence Bible Presbyterian Church

Coeur d’Alene, ID – Oct. 18th 6:00pm  4th Amendment, Lordship Church, Dalton Gardens, ID

 

If you’re going to travel from out of the area, you could consider staying at Huckleberry Mountain Homestead and Breakfast in Cocolalla, ID which is between Sandpoint and Coeur d’Alene.

ARRL: Radio Amateur on St. Lucia Relays Hurricane Reports

From ARRL.org, Radio Amateur on St. Lucia Relays Reports of Hurricane Devastation on Dominica, a reminder of the usefulness of alternative communications methods during a disaster:

As “potentially catastrophic Hurricane Maria” is headed for the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. Frans van Santbrink, J69DS, on St. Lucia checked into the VoIP Hurricane Net to relay damage reports he gathered via repeater conversations with hams on Dominica, which was hit by Category 5 Hurricane Maria.

He recounted a damage report from Kerry Fevrier, J69YH, in Roseau, Dominica. “Trees down, river has flooded half the village, cars are all over, most houses have lost their roofs or are destroyed, the area between his house and the church is just flattened…in his words, ‘devastation is total,’” van Santbrink told the net.

He also heard from J73CI, who has lost his roof; J73WA on the northern end of the island, who lost his tower and was uncertain how he was going to weather the back end of the storm, and J73MH, who also lost his roof and was “just hunkering down and hoping for the best.”

Click here to read the entire article

ARRL: Emergency Net Active in Wake of Central Mexico Earthquake 9/20/17

From arrl.org, Amateur Radio Emergency Net Active in Wake of Earthquake in Central Mexico.

The FMRE National Emergency Net has activated on 7.060 MHz following a magnitude 7.1 earthquake in the central Mexico state of Puebla at 1814 UTC on Tuesday. The net also uses 3.690 MHz and 14.120 MHz as well as IRLP reflector 9200, channel 08.

The epicenter was some 75 miles southeast of Mexico City, which felt the temblor. Preliminary reports indicate a lot of collapsed buildings and missing people.

The FMRE net has been handling traffic to make up for the loss of some cellular networks, FMRE President Al Tomez, XE2O, told ARRL. The earthquake came 32 years to the day after a 1985 magnitude 8.0 earthquake struck the Mexico City, killing some 9,500 people in and around the capital city.

Just one week ago, a magnitude 8.1 earthquake struck off Mexico’s southern coast, killing more than 60 people and causing considerable damage.

All Outdoor: Flashlights Are Not a One Size Fits All Solution

Kevin Felts over at All Outdoor has an article, Flashlights Are Not a One Size Fits All Solution, discussing the need for several different types of lighting during a disaster. Citing problems people encountered during recent hurricanes, he advocates selecting lighting based on tasks and not just on maximum light output.

“Most of my flashlights are high intensity Surefire/Streamlight/Pelican tactical lights that I’ve been issued or bought for use on a firearm. What I didn’t think about though, is how useless those lights are for tasks like reading or searching through drawers/closets where the intense light washes out visibility of details. 375 lumens is overkill for reading anything. I also didn’t realize just how fast they would use batteries.

“A two-hour run time is fine for clearing the house in the middle of the night, or running out to the shed for a moment, but getting ready for a hurricane in the dark? Between two lights, we burned through all of our batteries (48) before electricity was restored…”

What is reasonable?

  • Reasonable lumens for reading, cooking, walking around the house… etc.
  • Area light, rather than a focused beam.
  • Rechargeable.
  • No fire hazard.

Read the entire article by clicking here.

Christianity Today: How Churches Can Prepare for Disasters

An article over at Christianity Today, How Churches Can Prepare for Disasters, discusses the importance of emergency preparedness for churches.

Right now, churches across much of Texas are responding to emergencies, while churches across much of Florida are preparing for them. Below are practical steps churches and families can take to prepare for and respond to emergencies, and lessons from churches in New York and New Orleans who suffered through natural and manmade disasters.

What churches have learned

Right after 9/11, Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City was flooded with requests for help—and with generous gifts from all over to help meet those needs. Because their church had an organized diaconate with trained leaders, Redeemer was able to distribute assistance much more efficiently than groups arriving after the event. “We saw many other relief efforts spend a great deal of money on hiring new staff and renting office space—very high cost items,” says Tim Keller. This may be a good lesson to support existing churches and ministries when we can, rather than “build our own.”

One lesson Redeemer learned from 9/11 was to watch for burnout among their staff. “We did not recognize the danger as much as we should have,” Keller said…

Keith Collins, pastor of Lakeview Christian Center, realized how important their spiritual preparation was during and after that disaster:

“How helpful it was for the church to be ‘theologically prepared’ for suffering. Scripture presents to us a God who is sovereign over every detail of his creation, including the catastrophes, and that God is working all things for his glory and our good. One of the most encouraging things that I observed as a pastor was that in the midst of our people losing homes, businesses, and having to relocate, they weren’t walking around asking, ‘Why, God?'”

That kind of heart-preparation is vital. It will be even more important if God allows a much more serious disaster on American soil…

How churches can prepare

To begin, churches should encourage their member families to prepare, both for their own well being, and so they will be better able to help others, whether in organized church efforts or in their neighborhoods. As they prepare, churches can encourage members to store food, water, and other items to share with others, which could make an enormous difference if an emergency lasts for weeks or months…

Click here to read the entire article

Related:

Spiritual Preparedness for the Christian Prepper

Small Parish Permaculture

Southern Baptist Convention Church Preparedness document (pdf)